Where Attorney General Nominee Jeff Sessions Comes Down On Consumer Issues

Where Attorney General Nominee Jeff Sessions Comes Down On Consumer Issues

The election may feel like it happened just yesterday, but it’s now ten days behind us, and the building transition to the administration turnover in January is well underway. As part of that, today we learned President-Elect Donald Trump’s top choice for a key role that affects consumers and consumer rights nationwide: he will nominate Sen. Jefferson Sessions of Alabama as Attorney General. [More]

jeffreyw

Can I Fly With A Turducken In My Carry-On This Thanksgiving?

As many Americans prepare to take to the skies next week for the Thanksgiving holiday, there will no doubt be those who wish to travel with their holiday-themed foods. But will airport security let your turducken aboard the plane with you? [More]

William Hook

Your Phone Sends All Your Call Records To Apple When iCloud Is Turned On

You’ve got a computer in your pocket that works as a camera, a video recorder, an internet connection, a game console, and everything else. And odds are good there’s some data on there that you want backed up safely, and that you use a cloud storage service to do just that. But your smartphone is, indeed, a phone — and your good old-fashioned calling records may be going places and getting stored in ways you do not intend. [More]

Office Depot Allegedly Diagnosing Computers With Nonexistent Viruses To Meet Sales Goals

Office Depot Allegedly Diagnosing Computers With Nonexistent Viruses To Meet Sales Goals

Retailers upselling customers on services they don’t need is nothing new, but a new report claims that some Office Depot employees are falsely claiming computers are infected with viruses in order to meet sales goals. [More]

Eric BEAUME

Shazam For Mac Is Always Listening For Tunes, Which Means Your Microphone Is Always On

Are you comfortable having your computer’s microphone on constantly? Shazam, a program that identifies the sound in songs, commercials, and TV shows for you, is always listening through your computer’s microphone in the program’s version for Mac computers. Is that a good or bad thing? It doesn’t necessarily mean that the app is listening in on you 24/7, but the idea may make you kind of uneasy. [More]

Chris Wilson

From Healthcare To Financial Protection: How Will The Trump White House Affect Consumers?

Elections always bring change; some more so than others. With yesterday’s results in the box and tallied, we now know that we are expecting not only a Trump administration next January, but also to have both houses of Congress and the White House all aligned under control of the same political party. That means that for at least two years, until the next midterm elections, the party in charge — in this case, the Republicans — has the ability to push through changes to policy and law, and we can expect it to do so. [More]

FCC

FCC Adopts New Privacy Rule Limiting What ISPs Can Do With Your Personal Data

Privacy is a complicated thing, especially online. While we all know companies like Google, Facebook, and Amazon — edge providers, in the parlance of regulators — collect and use our data, fewer of us think about how much the owners of the metaphorical pipes can see passing through them. So to that end, the FCC voted today to adopt rules designed to limit how much of internet subscribers’ data ISPs can sell, share, and trade, and to let customers have some more control over the uses of their personal information. [More]

If FTC Can’t Resurrect Lawsuit Over AT&T’s “Unlimited” Data, Telecoms May Be Even More Untouchable

jetsetpress

In August, an appeals court threw out the Federal Trade Commission’s lawsuit against AT&T over the way it marketed its “unlimited” data plans (which were anything but unlimited). Now the FTC is taking its case up the legal ladder, making the case that if it’s not allowed to sue AT&T, then all phone and internet providers can more easily get away with deceptive business practices. [More]

Saechang

Researchers Figure Out How To Put Invisible Backdoor In Common Internet Encryption

Even consumers who aren’t necessarily very technically-minded have at least a vague sense that an encrypted site is safer to use than one that isn’t. But encryption, alas, is never a permanent cure-all. And that’s why it’s troubling that new research has found it’s easier than anyone thought to put a backdoor into internet encryption that could let any big, surveillaince-minded entity (good morning, NSA) have a listen. [More]

Chris Blakeley

Final FCC Privacy Rule Won’t Ban Pay-For-Privacy, Will Require Some Opt-Ins

The FCC certainly is keeping busy this fall. After six months of mulling it over, commission chairman Tom Wheeler announced today that the final version of a privacy rule that would limit what your broadband carrier can do with your personal data is in fact real and on the agenda for the FCC’s October meeting later this month. [More]

Google Wants You To Switch From iPhone; Announces Home, Pixel Pre-Orders Start Today

Google Wants You To Switch From iPhone; Announces Home, Pixel Pre-Orders Start Today

In an event today in San Francisco, Google executives announced some of the worst-kept secrets in tech since the iPhone 7 turned out to exist. And although everyone expected the Pixel phone and Google Home to be today’s showcases, Google still managed to cram a whole lot into its 90 minutes… including a whole lot of not-so-subtle digs that anyone who wants to walk out on Apple might find today’s the time. [More]

tomQ

Watch Out For Card Skimmers On Gas Pumps In Arizona (And Everywhere Else, Too)

Going to an actual attendant and paying cash for gas is something fewer and fewer of us do every year. But for all the problems of cash, it might be less risky than sticking your credit card in any old gas pump, where a skimmer can grab and steal your data with very little effort. And those skimmers are everywhere. Case in point? Arizona.

[More]

Ninja M.

BlackBerry Won’t Be Designing Or Building Its Own Devices Anymore

BlackBerry is taking a big step back from the company it used to be, announcing today that it’s planning to stop designing and building its own devices, and will instead outsource that work to manufacturers. [More]

Yahoo

Yahoo Facing Lawsuits, Senate Inquiry, Possibly Merger Issues After Massive Data Breach

Last week was pretty rough for Yahoo, which confirmed on Thursday that it suffered a major data breach affecting more than half a billion (yes, with a B) users. Now 500 million people with Yahoo accounts are trying to figure out what to do next… but they’re not the only ones. [More]

Yahoo

Yahoo Confirms Massive Data Breach; At Least 500 Million Users Affected

As was rumored this morning, so it has come to pass. Yahoo has confirmed a massive data breach — and it’s far, far bigger than anyone guessed at first. [More]

Why Do I Suddenly Have To Log In Now To Use The Graphics Card I’ve Had For Years?

Why Do I Suddenly Have To Log In Now To Use The Graphics Card I’ve Had For Years?

Gaming can be, well, a kind of consumer-unfriendly industry. Players who build and upgrade their own PCs, though, usually expect a level of control over their experience that console gaming may not offer. And anything that changes that is not likely to go over well, as a change to certain Nvidia software is demonstrating. [More]

Comcast Already Crying That FCC Set-Top Box Proposal Violates Federal Law

Knight725

Within minutes of FCC Chair Tom Wheeler unveiling his final proposal for reforming the multibillion-dollar set-top box market, Comcast was already firing back, accusing the Commission of violating the law and hinting at a legal challenge to come. [More]