Search results for: richard blumenthal

MeneerDijk

What The Heck Is Single-Payer Healthcare, Anyway?

Health coverage has been in the news in a big way this year, thanks to Republican-led efforts in Congress to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) throughout the spring and summer. That plan ultimately failed, but both sides of the political aisle do agree on one thing: There’s a lot of room to go on improving health care access and containing medical costs. A new rallying cry has risen up among Democrats: Time for single-payer! But what does that actually mean — and what could it look like? [More]

dave lewis 88

Senators Ask FTC To Finalize The Contact Lens Rule Already

Readers who wear glasses or contact lenses may be surprised to learn that their doctor is supposed to give them a copy of their prescription without being asked, but it’s true. This is especially important for contact lens wearers, whose right to shop around and buy their lenses from any authorized vendor they like is protected by the Federal Trade Commission. Proposed rules would hold doctors even more accountable, requiring them to report to the FTC that they gave patients copies of their prescriptions. [More]

Freaktography

31 Senators Ask Trump Administration To Not Strip Nursing Home Residents, Families Of Their Legal Rights

Nursing homes and assisted living facilities in the U.S. have faced increasing criticism for shoddy care and bad business practices. At the same time, many of these facilities have begun using contractual language that explicitly prohibits residents or their loved ones from filing lawsuits when things go wrong. Now dozens of senators are calling on the Trump administration to rethink its decision to let this practice continue. [More]

With 30 Hot Car Deaths So Far This Year, Lawmakers Once Again Push For Alert Systems

With 30 Hot Car Deaths So Far This Year, Lawmakers Once Again Push For Alert Systems

More than 30 children have died in hot cars so far in 2017, and two of those deaths occurred just last weekend. In an attempt to prevent these tragedies from happening, a group of lawmakers have once again introduced legislation that would require cars to be equipped with technology — that already exists — to alert drivers that a passenger remains in the back seat when a vehicle is turned off.  [More]

Lawmakers Call For Removal Of Education Dept. Civil Rights Chief After College Rape Claims

Lawmakers Call For Removal Of Education Dept. Civil Rights Chief After College Rape Claims

A week after the head of the Department of Education’s Civil Rights division publicly apologized for making an unsubstantiated and unsourced claim that nine in 10 sexual assault and harassment allegations are baseless and can be tied back to nothing more than too much drinking and bad breakups, lawmakers are calling for the her removal. [More]

Chris Blakeley

The Internet Privacy Rule Is Dead, But Could Anyone Bring It Back?

The laws, rules, and regulations governing our world aren’t etched into mountains; they can be changed. That’s how we got new rules intended to protect our private information from being used and abused by internet service providers, and how we lost those very same rules just a few short months later. Could the pendulum swing back and restore these privacy guidelines? Not likely. [More]

John Kittelsrud

Lawmakers Try Yet Again To Create Minimum Seat Size Requirement On Planes

If at first you don’t succeed, just keep proposing legislation: A group of lawmakers Thursday introduced a pair of bills that would create a seat-size standard for commercial airlines, as well as a minimum distance between rows of seats.  [More]

Sen. Al Franken

Congress Set Up For Showdown Over Consumers’ Ability To Sue Corporations

A subject that many Americans don’t even know about — until it’s too late for them to do anything — is now shaping up to be a battleground between lawmakers in both the House and Senate, where two very different sets of legislation will go head to head to determine whether or not companies can strip their customers of their constitutional right to file a lawsuit in court — and their First Amendment right to speak freely. [More]

Mike Mozart

Lawmakers Urge In-Depth Review Of Santander Bank’s Practices After Discrimination Allegations

Santander Bank has faced a number of issues in recent years, from an investigation into its auto loan business to receiving a $10 million fine over alleged illegal overdraft practices. More recently, the company received a failing grade from regulators when it came to its community lending business, prompting lawmakers to condemn the bank’s alleged discrimination and urge federal banking regulators to review the financial institution’s practices. [More]

Senators Want To Know Why Price Of Lifesaving Drug Went From $690 To $4,500

Senators Want To Know Why Price Of Lifesaving Drug Went From $690 To $4,500

As you’re probably all too aware, the U.S. is in the midst of an opioid epidemic, meaning that some life-saving overdose treatments have become crucial tools for hospitals, law enforcement, first responders, and families of addicts. At the same time, the makers of one such vital drug have raised the price by more than 600% since 2014, drawing the attention of lawmakers who want to know why. [More]

Steve

Senators Say Loss Of Net Neutrality Will “Unleash A Political Firestorm”

There’s nothing subtle about the writing on the wall: New FCC chair Ajit Pai openly despises and wants to do away with the 2015 Open Internet Order, which reclassified broadband as a utility-like service, and cemented the “net neutrality” rules. However, some lawmakers and consumer advocates have made it known that they aren’t ready to give up these recently earned protections. [More]

Al Ibrahim

Cable Company Can’t Reach Agreement With CBS, Tells Customers To Go Stream It Instead

There’s a contract dispute afoot in the Nutmeg State. Cable company Optimum has been unable to reach a retransmission agreement with the Hartford CBS affiliate, and as a result, thousands of Connecticut residents are left without access to the news and shows they’re paying for but can’t watch. It’s an irritatingly common story, but this time there’s a wrinkle: The cable company is still directing its customers to watch the network… they just want subscribers to do it online, instead. [More]

frankieleon

Settlements Allow Auto Dealers To Continue Selling Unrepaired Recalled Vehicles As “Safe”

If you bought a used car from a dealership that proudly claims to put each vehicle through “125-point” or “172-point” inspections, you might assume that your vehicle is safe to drive and that it isn’t under recall for a potentially deadly defect. However, a number of big names in used cars — including CarMax and General Motors — have recently entered into settlements with federal regulators that could allow used car dealers to continue marketing their vehicles as safe even while they may have unrepaired defects. [More]

Ben Schumin

USDA Asks Meat, Dairy Companies To Replace Confusing Expiration & Sell-By Labels With “Best If Used By” Date

Though almost every food item you buy at the supermarket has some sort of expiration date — under the headers of “Sell By,” “Use By,” “Use Before,” “Best Before,” among others — printed on the packaging, the truth is date labels are largely voluntary and determined by the food producers. If handled properly, most foods are perfectly safe to eat after whatever date is on the label, but stores and consumers throw away an inordinate amount of food every year simply because that date has passed. In an effort to reduce food waste, the federal government is hoping to encourage meat and dairy producers to all use the same phrase: “Best If Used By.” [More]

M

Mylan To Start Selling $300 Generic EpiPen Pack Next Month

Under pressure to reduce the price of its expensive EpiPen emergency allergy treatment, drugmaker Mylan said in August that it would be introducing a generic version of the drug at half the retail price. Now it looks like the less-costly epinephrine auto-injector will be hitting the market after Thanksgiving.

[More]

Phillip Bradshaw

Senators Urge Mylan To Reimburse Defense Department For EpiPen Overcharges

A week after a report suggested that the Department of Defense had paid full retail price for EpiPens — to the tune of $54 million in overcharges — because the drug’s maker, Mylan, misclassified the live-saving medication, preventing the government from receiving proper rebates, lawmakers are calling on the drugmaker to reimburse those costs.  [More]

Samuel M. Livingston

Report: Takata Could File Bankruptcy Of U.S. Assets, But It Won’t Happen Soon

Weeks after Japanese parts maker Takata reportedly began mulling the idea of restructuring through a sale that could include a bankruptcy filing amid the prospect of being saddled with billions of dollars in costs the company faces linked to its massive shrapnel-shooting airbag debacle, we’re learning more about what exactly the bankruptcy prospect means.  [More]