M

6 Things You Should Know About Heather Bresch, The CEO Behind EpiPen Price Hike

As you may have heard, the cost of a life-saving EpiPen from drug maker Mylan increased as much as 600% in just nine years, causing lawmakers and health advocates to call on the drug company — and its CEO Heather Bresch — to lower the cost and provide answers for its increase in the first place. But that could be difficult given the executive’s personal connections not only to the medication, but one legislator.  [More]

M

Senators Demand Mylan Lower Cost Of Life-Saving Epipens, Call For Congressional Hearing

The cost of a life-saving EpiPen from drug maker Mylan increased as much as 600% in just nine years. That’s simply too much, lawmakers say, with some legislators now calling on the pharmaceutical giant to drop its price immediately, while others are pushing for a congressional hearing on the matter.  [More]

So Cal Metro

Senators Want Airlines To Explain Recent Outages & Why Travelers Couldn’t Be Rebooked On Competing Carriers

In just the last few weeks, Delta and Southwest each experienced massive system-wide outages that grounded thousands of flights and ruined travel plans for countless passengers — and there are reasons to believe it could happen to other carriers. Now some lawmakers want the airlines to answer for these failures and to explain what’s being done to prevent future shutdowns. [More]

inajeep

103 Lawmakers Come Out In Favor Of Revoking Banks’ “Get Out Of Jail Free” Card

In May, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau proposed new rules for financial services companies that could severely limit their ability to sidestep legal liability by forcing wronged customers out of the courtroom and into the byzantine, unfair world of binding arbitration. Some in Congress recently tacked on some legislative pork to an appropriations bill that would prevent the CFPB from moving forward on these rules, but today more than 100 federal lawmakers came out to commend the Bureau for its efforts. [More]

NHTSA

Senators Urge Honda To Issue “Do Not Drive” Notice For Some Vehicles With Takata Airbags

Last month, tests revealed that each time certain older model Honda and Acura vehicles’ Takata airbags deploy, there’s up to a 50% chance that it will rupture, shooting shrapnel at drivers and passengers. While federal regulators urged owners not to drive these vehicles, lawmakers are now calling on Honda to issue the same warning to owners of vehicles containing the defective airbags.  [More]

Senate Approves Bill To Outlaw Vermont GMO Labels, Replace Them With Barcodes

Senate Approves Bill To Outlaw Vermont GMO Labels, Replace Them With Barcodes

Even though some of the nation’s largest food producers — including General Mills, PepsiCo, Campbell Soup, Mars Inc., Bimbo, and Nestle — have already updated their packaging to comply with Vermont’s new labeling requirement for foods containing genetically modified (GMO) ingredients, these tiny lines of text may be short lived. Last night, the U.S. Senate voted to approve legislation that will not only outlaw Vermont’s labeling requirement, but eventually (maybe) replace these text labels with something as obscure as a barcode. [More]

Giuliana Massaro

Window Blind Trade Group Agrees To Set Standards, Keep Kids From Cords

You might not think of window blinds as something dangerous, but they pose a risk to children, who can entangle themselves in the cords and be strangled. An average of one child every month has strangled to death on the cord to a window covering for the last few decades. Why hasn’t the window covering industry invented something better and safer than a long piece of string to raise and lower our blinds? An industry group announced today that they will figure one out. [More]

Google Fiber Copies Comcast, AT&T; Forces Users To Give Up Their Legal Right To Sue

Discrete_Photography

Since its introduction in Kansas City, Google Fiber has presented itself as a disruptive force in the pay-TV and internet markets, offering high speeds for reasonable prices, and bringing new competition to markets generally dominated by a single provider. So it’s disappointing to learn that Fiber has decided to follow in the footsteps of AT&T, Comcast, Verizon, Time Warner Cable, and other reviled providers by quietly stripping its customers of their right to sue the company in a court of law. [More]

New Legislation Tries To Clear Up Confusion Over “Sell By,” “Best By” & Other Expiration Dates

Timothy J Silverman

Stroll around your favorite supermarket and you’ll see a cornucopia of deadlines stamped and printed on your food. That carton of milk says “Sell By,” the box of mac and cheese says “Best Before,” and the jar of horseradish has a “Use By,” none of which are official or necessarily an indicator of safety or quality, resulting in millions of pounds of food being wasted every year based on sometimes arbitrary dates. New legislation coming this week in both the House and Senate hopes to clear up the confusion over the many expiration date labels you find on food. [More]

Quinn Dombrowski

Delta Offers Up Workers To Help TSA At Major Hubs In The Name Of Shorter Lines

frankieleon

Senators Tell Airlines: Drop Checked Bag Fees To Speed Up Airport Security

With most airlines now charging for checked bags, passengers frequently travel with rolling suitcases that push the limits of the term “carry-on.” Would getting rid of these fees (and the bulkier carry-on bags) alleviate the increasingly long wait times at airport security? Yes, at least according to two lawmakers. [More]

Camilo Rueda López

FDA To Reconsider Definition Of “Healthy” On Food Labels

When you see a some food marketed as “healthy” or “natural,” do you know exactly what, if anything, those terms mean? The Food and Drug Administration has decided to rethink its requirements for what it takes to market a product as “healthy,” while advocates and lawmakers are pushing the agency to define “natural” in a way that more people would understand. [More]

Screwed Over By A For-Profit College? You Probably Signed Away Your Right To Sue

Screwed Over By A For-Profit College? You Probably Signed Away Your Right To Sue

When Corinthian Colleges Inc. collapsed, leaving thousands of students in the lurch with student loan debt and credits that they didn’t know would be usable at other schools, they were generally unable to sue the failed for-profit educator because the students had unwittingly signed away their right to a jury trial or class action. CCI wasn’t the only for-profit operator with this anti-consumer practice, and a new report tries to get a grasp on the scope of the problem. [More]

Take This Weight-Loss Supplement And Give Up Your Right To A Jury Trial

Take This Weight-Loss Supplement And Give Up Your Right To A Jury Trial

If you wanted to get an idea on the ridiculous overuse of forced arbitration, here’s one of the more absurd examples we’ve seen — a weight-loss supplement with the added non-benefit of stripping users of their right to sue the company that made the pills. [More]

New Bill Could Stop Cable & Phone Companies From Taking Away Customers’ Right To Sue

Kat Northern Lights Man

Five years ago today, the U.S. Supreme Court sided with AT&T, ruling that companies could use a couple paragraphs of legalese buried deep in unchangeable user agreements to strip customers of their right to file a lawsuit. An upcoming piece of legislation seeks to restore that right for telecom customers. [More]

Senators Call On FTC To Do Something About Misleading Fashion Sites

Senators Call On FTC To Do Something About Misleading Fashion Sites

It seems that someone in the offices of Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) or Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), or perhaps both senators, has either ordered clothing from a misleading China-based site or read Buzzfeed recently. Both senators announced today that they’ve sent a letter to Federal Trade Commission chair Edith Ramirez, urging the FTC to take action against sites that advertise great deals and don’t deliver what customers expected. [More]

.Seuss

Senate Votes Down Bill That Would Have Overturned States’ GMO Labeling Laws

Regardless of whether you’re against, for, or ambivalent about genetically modified foods, surveys show that an overwhelming majority of Americans at least want to know whether the items they buy contain genetically engineered ingredients, and some states have enacted laws intended to require labeling of GMO and GE products. Today, the U.S. Senate voted to strike down a new piece of legislation that would have overturned these local laws in favor of a voluntary labeling program. [More]

(Skip Nyegard)

New Bill Aims To Limit “Ridiculous” Airline Fees For Checked Bags, Cancellations

Most airlines now charge fees for everything from checked bags to changing your itinerary, resulting in billions of dollars of revenue for carriers and annoyance for travelers. And the fees are going up, with baggages fees up 67% since 2009, and cancellation charges up by 33% for domestic flights. Newly introduced legislation aims to curb these fee hikes. [More]