Senators Want To Know Why Price Of Lifesaving Drug Went From $690 To $4,500

Senators Want To Know Why Price Of Lifesaving Drug Went From $690 To $4,500

As you’re probably all too aware, the U.S. is in the midst of an opioid epidemic, meaning that some life-saving overdose treatments have become crucial tools for hospitals, law enforcement, first responders, and families of addicts. At the same time, the makers of one such vital drug have raised the price by more than 600% since 2014, drawing the attention of lawmakers who want to know why. [More]

Steve

Senators Say Loss Of Net Neutrality Will “Unleash A Political Firestorm”

There’s nothing subtle about the writing on the wall: New FCC chair Ajit Pai openly despises and wants to do away with the 2015 Open Internet Order, which reclassified broadband as a utility-like service, and cemented the “net neutrality” rules. However, some lawmakers and consumer advocates have made it known that they aren’t ready to give up these recently earned protections. [More]

Al Ibrahim

Cable Company Can’t Reach Agreement With CBS, Tells Customers To Go Stream It Instead

There’s a contract dispute afoot in the Nutmeg State. Cable company Optimum has been unable to reach a retransmission agreement with the Hartford CBS affiliate, and as a result, thousands of Connecticut residents are left without access to the news and shows they’re paying for but can’t watch. It’s an irritatingly common story, but this time there’s a wrinkle: The cable company is still directing its customers to watch the network… they just want subscribers to do it online, instead. [More]

Settlements Allow Auto Dealers To Continue Selling Unrepaired Recalled Vehicles As “Safe”

frankieleon

If you bought a used car from a dealership that proudly claims to put each vehicle through “125-point” or “172-point” inspections, you might assume that your vehicle is safe to drive and that it isn’t under recall for a potentially deadly defect. However, a number of big names in used cars — including CarMax and General Motors — have recently entered into settlements with federal regulators that could allow used car dealers to continue marketing their vehicles as safe even while they may have unrepaired defects. [More]

Ben Schumin

USDA Asks Meat, Dairy Companies To Replace Confusing Expiration & Sell-By Labels With “Best If Used By” Date

Though almost every food item you buy at the supermarket has some sort of expiration date — under the headers of “Sell By,” “Use By,” “Use Before,” “Best Before,” among others — printed on the packaging, the truth is date labels are largely voluntary and determined by the food producers. If handled properly, most foods are perfectly safe to eat after whatever date is on the label, but stores and consumers throw away an inordinate amount of food every year simply because that date has passed. In an effort to reduce food waste, the federal government is hoping to encourage meat and dairy producers to all use the same phrase: “Best If Used By.” [More]

M

Mylan To Start Selling $300 Generic EpiPen Pack Next Month

Under pressure to reduce the price of its expensive EpiPen emergency allergy treatment, drugmaker Mylan said in August that it would be introducing a generic version of the drug at half the retail price. Now it looks like the less-costly epinephrine auto-injector will be hitting the market after Thanksgiving.

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Phillip Bradshaw

Senators Urge Mylan To Reimburse Defense Department For EpiPen Overcharges

A week after a report suggested that the Department of Defense had paid full retail price for EpiPens — to the tune of $54 million in overcharges — because the drug’s maker, Mylan, misclassified the live-saving medication, preventing the government from receiving proper rebates, lawmakers are calling on the drugmaker to reimburse those costs.  [More]

Samuel M. Livingston

Report: Takata Could File Bankruptcy Of U.S. Assets, But It Won’t Happen Soon

Weeks after Japanese parts maker Takata reportedly began mulling the idea of restructuring through a sale that could include a bankruptcy filing amid the prospect of being saddled with billions of dollars in costs the company faces linked to its massive shrapnel-shooting airbag debacle, we’re learning more about what exactly the bankruptcy prospect means.  [More]

NHTSA

Honda Needs To Do More About Cars With Explosive Airbags

Five months ago, tests revealed that each time certain older model Honda and Acura vehicles’ Takata airbags deploy, there’s up to a 50% chance that it will rupture, shooting shrapnel at drivers and passengers. Yet, according to federal safety regulators, more than 300,000 of these vehicles — deemed to be at the most risk for explosions — have yet to be fixed, and that’s a problem.  [More]

Consumerist | Sen. Ron Wyden speaking in March, 2016

Senator Concerned AT&T/Time Warner Merger May Create Net Neutrality Violations

Well, that didn’t take long: Although the formal paperwork to make the AT&T / Time Warner merger happen hasn’t yet been filed anywhere for review and approval, several lawmakers have already been out in front of it voicing their sternest disapproval. Joining the club today? Sen. Ron Wyden (OR), who’s asking the FCC to please think of net neutrality, and consumers, when it comes time for merger review. [More]

Why AT&T Is Buying Time Warner, And Why So Many People Aren’t Happy About It

Why AT&T Is Buying Time Warner, And Why So Many People Aren’t Happy About It

The time from new rumor to signed deal was only about two days, and yet here we are: AT&T is putting the moves on Time Warner, planning to bring the content powerhouse under its roof. This proposal will now, of course, have to grind its way through the gears of government approval. But while this proposal is a giant deal for two giant companies, the name that’s likely to come up more than any other in all the comments back-and-forth is neither Time Warner nor AT&T, but rather a competitor: Comcast. [More]

Samsung

Senator Wants To Know What’s Up With Samsung’s Lithium-Ion Batteries

While Samsung says it tested the batteries used in its now recalled and defunct Galaxy Note 7 devices before putting them in consumers’ hands, there are still plenty of unanswered questions related to how such a dangerous problem — exploding phones — could have gone unnoticed.  [More]

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Mylan To Pay $465M To Settle EpiPen Medicaid Pricing Scandal; Critics Call Deal “Inadequate”

Amid recent revelations that EpiPen maker Mylan has been overcharging U.S. taxpayers for potentially hundreds of millions of dollars since at least 2011, the drug company says it has agreed to pay $465 million to close the book on a federal investigation into its Medicaid pricing — all without admitting any liability. [More]

Listener42

Lawmakers: Takata Bankruptcy Could Leave Consumers On The Hook For Repairs

Facing billions of dollars in losses related to fines, penalties, repair costs, and other expenses connected to the massive recall of shrapnel-shooting airbags, Takata is reportedly looking at restructuring through bankruptcy as an option. But if the auto parts maker goes this route, would we all be stuck footing the bill to replace the defective safety devices?  [More]

ken fager

Senators Urge Continued Oversight Of For-Profit Colleges Amid Another Closure

For-profit college operators continued to take hits this week, as lawmakers called for federal aid restriction on the Computer Systems Institute brand, and smaller Regency Beauty Institute brand announced it would close.  [More]

Brad Clinesmith

Ahead Of Tomorrow’s Vote, Several Senators Urge FCC To Approve Set-Top Box Plan

Tomorrow, at its monthly open meeting, the FCC will be voting on the most controversial rule it’s undertaken this year: whether, and how, to let consumers get out of paying their cable company a fee every month for mandatory set-top boxes.

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