flaimo

Live Sports May Be Next Big Thing For Amazon Prime

Amazon Prime members could soon be getting more bang for their buck when it comes to entertainment, as the e-commerce giant is rumored to be in talks with major sports leagues and television networks to offer live-streaming of sporting events.  [More]

Uber: No, We’re Not Going To Sell User Information

Alper Çuğun

Late last week, Twitter began to light up with claims that Uber had changed its terms of service to give the company the right to to modify and sell users’ data — not a minor concern for any privacy-minded consumer. However, Uber points out that the specific clause at the center of this mini-controversy is not new, not unique to the ride-hailing service, and doesn’t give the company that god-like authority some people are claiming. [More]

Why Comcast Is Letting Other Cable Companies Use Its X1 Platform

Matthew Keys

The modern media landscape is a little tricky. Viewers are watching more video than ever, but they’re also watching less TV. In fact, the meaning of “TV” itself, as well as “cable,” is changing constantly. But remarks from a Comcast Cable executive at a conference on Thursday show that the nation’s largest cable company is ready to make money off of you no matter what the future holds. [More]

Samsung

Samsung Banning Galaxy Note 7 Devices From Connecting To Networks In New Zealand

If you haven’t already turned in your potentially explosive, recalled Samsung Galaxy Note 7, now is the time: Samsung plans to disconnect the phones from cellular networks — at least in New Zealand.  [More]

You Can (Finally) Use The Netflix App On Your Comcast Cable Box

You Can (Finally) Use The Netflix App On Your Comcast Cable Box

The years of enmity, it seems, are well and truly behind us. Comcast and Netflix have decided that from here on out, they are two great tastes that taste great together, and they’re (finally) taking the deal that puts Netflix content on your Comcast cable box nationwide. [More]

Rob Bruce

Google To Fiber Cities: Don’t Freak Out, We’re Not Cancelling Anything

When Alphabet joyously announced last week that Google Fiber was so great that they were going to stop expanding it, lay people off, and lose the CEO, some confusion followed. Google Fiber is, after all, still kind of a nascent business — in most cities where it has a presence, it’s still just a toe-hold, with more expansion waiting on the horizon. So are the other towns and neighborhoods who have been waiting for service still going to get it? [More]

DOJ Sues DirecTV Over Blackout Of SportsNet LA

Atwater Village Newbie

The Justice Department has filed a lawsuit against DirecTV, alleging that the nation’s largest satellite TV provider illegally shared non-public information with other pay-TV companies about their negotiations to carry SportsNet LA, the only cable channel in Los Angeles to air most Dodgers games. [More]

Samsung

Why Don’t Carriers Just Kick The Galaxy Note 7 Off Their Networks?

Even when a recall is heavily publicized, not all of the items are recovered and returned to the manufacturer. That may be the case with the Galaxy Note 7, a smartphone that has a small chance of suddenly exploding for reasons that even the manufacturer still doesn’t fully understand. So why don’t phone carriers just block the devices from their networks, or why doesn’t Samsung remotely brick the devices to force customers to stop using them? Turns out that’s a tricky legal and ethical issue. [More]

Samsung Officially Recalls All Galaxy Note 7 Phones, Including Replacement Devices

Samsung Officially Recalls All Galaxy Note 7 Phones, Including Replacement Devices

Not even two months after Samsung first released the Galaxy Note 7, the phone has already been recalled and replaced, only to be discontinued. Now, for the second time in five weeks, Samsung and U.S. safety regulators have issued an official recall covering all Galaxy Note 7 phones. [More]

Mike Mozart

Amid Reports Of Billing Issues, FCC Sees Spike In Verizon Wireless Complaints

Amid recent reports of Verizon Wireless customers getting dinged on their phone bills with unexpected data overages, it may come as no surprise that the Federal Communications Commission has seen a spike in complaints related to the company. [More]

Appeals Court Calls CFPB Structure Unconstitutional; Throws Out $109M Penalty Over Alleged Mortgage Kickbacks

Adam Fagen

Since its creation as part of the sweeping financial reforms of 2010, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has, through settlements and enforcement actions, returned billions of dollars to Americans who were wronged by financial institutions. But consumer advocates say a new ruling from a federal appeals court threatens to undercut the Bureau’s independence and its ability to hold banks, credit card companies, mortgage lenders, and others accountable. [More]

Exec Of Company That Sold Fake Parmesan Cheese May Avoid Jail With Food Pantry Work

quinn.anya

Remember the company that peddled imitation grated Parmesan cheese and billed it as the real deal (silly question — of course you do, no one could forget such a crime against cheese)? U.S. prosecutors are now asking that the executive of Castle Cheese Inc. be sentenced to time working in a food pantry or soup kitchen. [More]

Will

Walmart Slowing Store Openings, Accelerating Distribution Centers

It’s no secret that Walmart is gunning for some of Amazon’s customer base: gobbling up e-commerce site Jet.com for $3.3 billion, mulling the idea of investing in Amazon competitor Flipkart, launching the $50/year Prime-rival Shipping Pass, and increasing distribution channels. As an indicator of the retailer’s online-focused future, Walmart has announced it is slowing the growth of its bricks-and-mortar stores while building more warehouses to expedite deliveries. [More]

Mike Seyfang

Amazon Can Charge Any Subscription To Any Card You Have On File If Your Primary Card Expires

A Consumerist reader recently went to run some errands and found the charge to her debit card was declined due to insufficient funds. She was puzzled — that account should have had at least $100 in it. So why were her funds insufficient? Because her Amazon Prime subscription had renewed on that card that day — even though she’d never once set up Prime to bill to it. [More]

Mike Mozart

AT&T Ends Snooping Program, Stops Charging Internet Users Extra For Privacy

AT&T offers GigaPower subscribers in several cities two options: pay $70 for your connection and get your data snooped on, or keep your privacy and pay $99. The company has regularly defended the program from critics, and claimed that it’s basically the wave of the future. And yet today, seemingly out of nowhere, A&T has suddenly announced that it will be dropping the option nationwide, and charging all consumers the same — lower — price. [More]