Why Don’t Carriers Just Kick The Galaxy Note 7 Off Their Networks?

Even when a recall is heavily publicized, not all of the items are recovered and returned to the manufacturer. That may be the case with the Galaxy Note 7, a smartphone that has a small chance of suddenly exploding for reasons that even the manufacturer still doesn’t fully understand. So why don’t phone carriers just block the devices from their networks, or why doesn’t Samsung remotely brick the devices to force customers to stop using them? Turns out that’s a tricky legal and ethical issue. [More]

Samsung Officially Recalls All Galaxy Note 7 Phones, Including Replacement Devices

Samsung Officially Recalls All Galaxy Note 7 Phones, Including Replacement Devices

Not even two months after Samsung first released the Galaxy Note 7, the phone has already been recalled and replaced, only to be discontinued. Now, for the second time in five weeks, Samsung and U.S. safety regulators have issued an official recall covering all Galaxy Note 7 phones. [More]

Mike Mozart

Amid Reports Of Billing Issues, FCC Sees Spike In Verizon Wireless Complaints

Amid recent reports of Verizon Wireless customers getting dinged on their phone bills with unexpected data overages, it may come as no surprise that the Federal Communications Commission has seen a spike in complaints related to the company. [More]

Appeals Court Calls CFPB Structure Unconstitutional; Throws Out $109M Penalty Over Alleged Mortgage Kickbacks

Adam Fagen

Since its creation as part of the sweeping financial reforms of 2010, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has, through settlements and enforcement actions, returned billions of dollars to Americans who were wronged by financial institutions. But consumer advocates say a new ruling from a federal appeals court threatens to undercut the Bureau’s independence and its ability to hold banks, credit card companies, mortgage lenders, and others accountable. [More]

Exec Of Company That Sold Fake Parmesan Cheese May Avoid Jail With Food Pantry Work


Remember the company that peddled imitation grated Parmesan cheese and billed it as the real deal (silly question — of course you do, no one could forget such a crime against cheese)? U.S. prosecutors are now asking that the executive of Castle Cheese Inc. be sentenced to time working in a food pantry or soup kitchen. [More]


Walmart Slowing Store Openings, Accelerating Distribution Centers

It’s no secret that Walmart is gunning for some of Amazon’s customer base: gobbling up e-commerce site for $3.3 billion, mulling the idea of investing in Amazon competitor Flipkart, launching the $50/year Prime-rival Shipping Pass, and increasing distribution channels. As an indicator of the retailer’s online-focused future, Walmart has announced it is slowing the growth of its bricks-and-mortar stores while building more warehouses to expedite deliveries. [More]

Mike Seyfang

Amazon Can Charge Any Subscription To Any Card You Have On File If Your Primary Card Expires

A Consumerist reader recently went to run some errands and found the charge to her debit card was declined due to insufficient funds. She was puzzled — that account should have had at least $100 in it. So why were her funds insufficient? Because her Amazon Prime subscription had renewed on that card that day — even though she’d never once set up Prime to bill to it. [More]

Mike Mozart

AT&T Ends Snooping Program, Stops Charging Internet Users Extra For Privacy

AT&T offers GigaPower subscribers in several cities two options: pay $70 for your connection and get your data snooped on, or keep your privacy and pay $99. The company has regularly defended the program from critics, and claimed that it’s basically the wave of the future. And yet today, seemingly out of nowhere, A&T has suddenly announced that it will be dropping the option nationwide, and charging all consumers the same — lower — price. [More]

Tom Raftery

Twitter Sales Rumors Heat Up, But Is A Deal Around The Corner?

In the three days since reports began to surface that Twitter was looking to sell itself — possibly to Google or professional networking site Salesforce — rumors, ranging from a $16 billion list price to a sale happening right this minute, have heated up significantly.  [More]


Samsung Galaxy Note 7 Owners Report Phone Exchange Program Not Going So Well

Nobody really wants their pocket to explode or their purse to catch fire. That’s bad. So owners of defective Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones, which have a manufacturing defect in the battery that can lead it to catch fire or explode, have been told to exchange theirs. That, however, is proving much easier on paper than in reality. [More]


If You Actually Want Comcast To Be Your Mobile Provider, 2017’s Your Year

If you really want more Comcast in your life, and you’re tired of all the options you already have for mobile phone service, well, Comcast’s CEO has some good news for you. Coming soon, the cable company America most loves to hate is cutting its own cord, and going wireless. [More]

Alec Taback

NYC Says Verizon Defaulted On Its Agreement To Make FiOS Available Citywide

Ask just about anyone in New York City what they think of Time Warner Cable and you’ll probably hear swear words that aren’t anatomically possible. The city hoped to improve things by opening up the market to competition from Verizon FiOS in 2008, but more than a year after an audit called out FiOS for apparently failing to live up to its obligation, the city says Verizon has defaulted on its agreement, meaning the company could face legal action. [More]

Nicholas Eckhart

Michigan Is Littered With Abandoned Kmarts, Which Is Actually Good For Retail

When a longtime retailer closes its doors, it can be a good thing for the area and for the local real estate market. Employees lose their jobs, and the remaining loyal shoppers lose their favorite store, but freeing up that real estate means that new and popular stores can renovate or tear down the buildings, replacing them with something that modern shoppers are interested in. [More]

Quinn Dombrowski

Delta’s Recent System Outage Cost The Airline $100M In Lost Revenue

Remember that major systems outage that hit Delta last month, prompting the airline to ground all flights worldwide? In addition to majorly ticking off customers who had their travel plans disrupted and grabbing the attention of lawmakers who have since demanded an explanation for these kinds of outages, Delta lost a whole lot of money. [More]

Roger Schultz

Massachusetts Will Tax Uber & Lyft, Give Some Of The Money To Taxis

Uber or Lyft will soon be supporting their biggest rivals in the Old Bay State, thanks to a newly signed law regulating the ride-hailing industry. In all, Massachusetts will tack on a $.20/ride fee for these newer companies, with the revenue being divided up between the state, cities, and the taxi industry. [More]