Phillip Pessar

TV Networks Giving You More On-Demand Options To Combat Netflix, Cord-Cutting

Broadcast TV networks are freely available over the air, so you might think that they wouldn’t care too much about the growing number of people ditching cable in favor of streaming services. After all, viewers can still get the network shows and local news for the price of a decent antenna. Then you realize that networks are raking in billions of dollars each year from pay-TV providers and you see they have an incentive to try to keep you from cutting the cord. [More]

Comcast Now Says It Will Offer Next-Gen Broadband In Chicago At Lower Price; You Just Have To Ask

cftarnase

Earlier this week, Comcast announced that it was launching its higher-speed next-generation broadband service in Chicago, but the only price it would confirm was double the lowest rate charged by Comcast in the other markets where it had already offered this service. However, Comcast has now confirmed to Consumerist that folks in Chicagoland will indeed be able to get the lower rate — if they know how to ask for it. [More]

Sprint Owner Softbank Still Dreams Of Buying T-Mobile

Sprint Owner Softbank Still Dreams Of Buying T-Mobile

It doesn’t matter that T-Mobile CEO John Legere said two years ago that he’s heard enough merger talk: the CEO of Softbank, the Japanese company that owns 80% of competitor Sprint, is still interested in buying the carrier. He’s happy to wait until the time is right. [More]

UPDATED: Comcast Bringing Next-Gen Internet Service To Chicago

cftarnase

UPDATE: Comcast now tells Consumerist that Chicago-area customers will indeed be able to get the lower, $70/month rate, but they will have to phone the company to get it (once their neighborhood has been upgraded to the next-gen service, of course). [More]

Adam Fagen

Nashville Mayor Wants Google, Comcast, AT&T To Sit Down And Make Nice Over Fiber Plans

Incumbent cable and telecom companies push back hard when Google wants to come to town with Fiber service. But while corporations file legal challenges and yell at each other by proxy, residents are stuck in the middle without competitive service. [More]

Your Cable Company Will Probably Give You Free HBO For A Few Months, But Good Luck Getting The “New Customer” Rate

Kenneth Rogers

For years, we here at Consumerist HQ have heard anecdotal claims that negotiating for a better rate from your cable provider is no longer as simple as it used to be. The discounts weren’t as deep, people would say, the offers were on the weak side, and in the wake of bad PR, companies have seemed more willing to call customers’ bluff and let them cancel service painlessly. Of course, anecdotes do not equal data, so we wanted to know: is this actually a thing? [More]

Ann Fisher

Retailers Trying To Lure College Customers Now So They’ll Become Lifelong Shoppers

Often when a shopper is loyal to a brand, product, or company, it’s simply because they have a long history with it. That’s why retailers are trying to hook college-age students now — even before full-time jobs bring them a disposable income — in the hopes that they’ll become lifelong shoppers. [More]

Appeals Court: Municipal Internet Is Great, But States Can Still Restrict Access

Steve

More than a dozen states have laws that either prohibit counties and cities from operating their own broadband internet networks, selling service directly to consumers, or expanding their service behind a prescribed footprint. In 2015, the FCC voted to preempt two of these laws — in Tennessee and North Carolina — but this morning a federal appeals court says the FCC lacks the legal authority to do so. [More]

Discrete_Photography

Google Pauses Plans To Build Google Fiber In Their Own Backyard

There’s a funny thing about silicon valley: the place in the country synonymous with high-tech, internet-based industry is not one of the places with the fanciest, most modern broadband networks. And now it’s going to have to wait even longer to get its turn. [More]

Ad Watchdog: Comcast Should Stop Claiming “Fastest Internet In America”

Ad Watchdog: Comcast Should Stop Claiming “Fastest Internet In America”

If you live in one of the many parts of the country served by Comcast, you’ve likely seen the company’s nearly endless ads claiming that its Xfinity broadband “delivers the fastest internet in America,” and the “fastest, most reliable in-home WiFi.” However, an ad industry watchdog group has asked Comcast to rein in its bragging. [More]

Mike Mozart

Comcast Would Rather Be More Like Tesla Than Netflix

While it remains to be seen what Comcast’s Next Big Thing will be — though it probably won’t be a streaming TV product — there’s one thing the company knows for sure: it doesn’t want to be anything like those Netflix guys. [More]

Hulu Kills Off Free Streaming Service, Goes Subscription Only

Hulu Kills Off Free Streaming Service, Goes Subscription Only

Once upon a time, TV was mostly a thing you watched for free, over an antenna. Commercials and corporate sponsorships made up the cost for networks. Then TV became cable. Then cable became your internet, and TV was once again briefly free, through streaming services with commercials. But then came subscription internet TV, and that’s where we are today, with Hulu finally pulling the plug on its non-subscription service. [More]

Park Ridge Trading Co.

Comcast Decides To Not Charge Early Termination Fees To Flood-Ravaged Stores

Flood waters recently tore through Ellicott City, MD, forcing some businesses to close up shop. One store says Comcast tried to rub salt in this fresh wound by demanding it pay hundreds of dollars to cancel service it can no longer use. [More]

Mike Mozart

Comcast Will Continue Using Overseas Call Centers

After being slammed by a string of high-profile customer service disasters, Comcast has made investments in recent year — like putting guarantees on appointments and increasing the size of its social media response team. However, one of the more annoying aspects of customer service calls isn’t going to change: The use of outsourced, overseas call centers. [More]

From Credit Cards To Mail-Order Steaks: 87 Companies That Are Taking Away Your Right To Sue

From Credit Cards To Mail-Order Steaks: 87 Companies That Are Taking Away Your Right To Sue

A recent study by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau found that even though most Americans have at least one financial product — checking accounts, credit cards, loans, investment accounts — that use forced arbitration clauses to strip the account-holder of their right to sue, very few of us know about these restrictions or understand what they mean. And as the list we’ve compiled shows, it’s not just banks that are playing the “get out of jail free” card with arbitration. [More]

YayAdrian

Comcast: Consumers Are Harmed If We Don’t Get To Charge Extra For Privacy

Internet service providers like making money. They don’t like regulations that prevent them from any avenues that could make them money. And they will argue basically anything they can think of to help prevent those regulations from happening. Like, for example, suggesting that you, the consumer, will actively suffer harm if Comcast and others aren’t allowed to charge you extra for keeping your data to yourself. [More]

Time Warner Joining The Hulu Crowd, Buying 10% Of The Streaming Service

Time Warner Joining The Hulu Crowd, Buying 10% Of The Streaming Service

In an era when everybody and their grandmother seems to be launching their own proprietary subscription streaming service, something about Hulu seems almost quaint. The platform is jointly owned by three giant media companies, and therefore is almost a pre-bundled service that actually carries programming from all of them. And eventually — but not quite yet — you can make that four. [More]

Discrete_Photography

Charter, Comcast, AT&T Really Want To Stall Chance Of Competition From Google Fiber

Consumers really like Google Fiber. Or, at the very least, they like the idea of Google Fiber: when the company says it’s considering bringing its super-speedy internet service to town, prospective subscribers happily sign up and towns do what they need to do to make themselves attractive to the business. And that sits very, very poorly with the companies that are already in town and don’t want to deal with a pesky thing like competition. [More]