afagen

Judge Rejects $100 Million Settlement Proposal In Uber Drivers Class Action

The man who ended up as the named plaintiff in a lawsuit of Uber drivers in Califoria and Massachusetts is dissatisfied with the proposed settlement of $100 million to be shared among all class members, and it turns out that the judge in the case doesn’t approve of that offer, either. The judge in the case agrees with him, it turns out, and both sides have been sent back to negotiate a new settlement. [More]

Adam Fagen

9-In-10 Big Banks Strip Customers Of Their Right To Jury Trial

If you ask someone on the street if they should have the right to sue their bank over something like an illegal overdraft fee, nearly everyone you speak to will invariably say yes. But a new report confirms that nearly all big banks are forcing customers to give up their right to a jury trial. [More]

inajeep

103 Lawmakers Come Out In Favor Of Revoking Banks’ “Get Out Of Jail Free” Card

In May, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau proposed new rules for financial services companies that could severely limit their ability to sidestep legal liability by forcing wronged customers out of the courtroom and into the byzantine, unfair world of binding arbitration. Some in Congress recently tacked on some legislative pork to an appropriations bill that would prevent the CFPB from moving forward on these rules, but today more than 100 federal lawmakers came out to commend the Bureau for its efforts. [More]

From Credit Cards To Mail-Order Steaks: 87 Companies That Are Taking Away Your Right To Sue

From Credit Cards To Mail-Order Steaks: 87 Companies That Are Taking Away Your Right To Sue

A recent study by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau found that even though most Americans have at least one financial product — checking accounts, credit cards, loans, investment accounts — that use forced arbitration clauses to strip the account-holder of their right to sue, very few of us know about these restrictions or understand what they mean. And as the list we’ve compiled shows, it’s not just banks that are playing the “get out of jail free” card with arbitration. [More]

Judge Shreds Uber; Says Company Can’t Prove Riders Are Giving Up Right To Sue

Judge Shreds Uber; Says Company Can’t Prove Riders Are Giving Up Right To Sue

Uber, like a large and growing number of companies, has a clause in its terms of use that prohibits customers from suing the company or joining together in any sort of class action against the ride-hailing service. However, a federal judge recently scolded Uber over this contractual gamesmanship and deemed this particular clause unenforceable because the company can’t prove that users actually agreed to these terms. [More]

Russian Track And Field Athletes Will Stay Banned From Rio Olympics After Appeal Fails

Russian Track And Field Athletes Will Stay Banned From Rio Olympics After Appeal Fails

Russia’s track and field athletes will have to sit out the Rio Olympics this summer, after the Court of Arbitration for Sport denied the country’s appeal, upholding a ban instated by the worldwide governing body for track and field sports, the International Association of Athletics Federations, amid a widespread doping controversy. [More]

Olympics Committee Considering Ban On All Russian Athletes From Rio Games

Olympics Committee Considering Ban On All Russian Athletes From Rio Games

A month after an ongoing doping scandal led to Russia’s track and field athletes being barred from competing in the upcoming 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, the International Olympic Committee says it is looking into its options for enacting a ban on the entire Russian team. [More]

Pokémon Go Strips Users Of Their Legal Rights; Here’s How To Opt Out

Pokémon Go Strips Users Of Their Legal Rights; Here’s How To Opt Out

Let’s be honest: just about every single one of us agrees to Terms of Service without ever reading what we’re signing away. It’s no different for craze-of-the-week Pokémon Go, a game with a clause in its terms that strips you of your right to file a lawsuit against the company. However, if you’re one of the many people who just started using the app in the last few days, you still have time to opt out and preserve your constitutional right to a jury trial. [More]

photographynatalia

House Passes Bill Allowing Banks To Continue Using “Get Out Of Jail Free” Card

A few months back, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau proposed new rules that would limit how banks, credit card companies, and other financial services could shield themselves from legitimate lawsuits by forcing customers to sign away their constitutional rights. Now, the House of Representatives has passed an appropriations bill that, if signed, would stop the CFPB from enforcing these rules and give banks back their “get out of jail free” cards. [More]

Snapchat Sued Over “Sexually Offensive Content” From Its Media Partners

Snapchat Sued Over “Sexually Offensive Content” From Its Media Partners

While many people might use Snapchat just to share photos and videos with friends, there’s also an area for brands and media companies to post content, which you can see in the app’s “Discover” tab. But according to a new lawsuit against the social media company, that feature is showing minors “sexually offensive content” without warning. [More]

Lawmakers Want Answers On Walmart Prepaid Card Glitch That Left Thousands Without Funds

Lawmakers Want Answers On Walmart Prepaid Card Glitch That Left Thousands Without Funds

When a prepared credit card system goes down, millions of unbanked American lose their ability to access funds needed to pay bills, buy groceries, and make other purchases. This scenario was illustrated last month when customers using Walmart-branded Green Dot prepaid debit cards said they had been stranded without their funds for several days, and in some cases weeks. Now, a pair of lawmakers wants to understand the debacle better and work to prevent something similar from happening again.  [More]

Lyft

Judge Approves $27 Million Settlement In Lyft Class Action For California Drivers

The class action lawsuit filed on behalf of drivers against ride-hailing service Lyft is one legal step closer to resolution: the judge has approved the $27 million settlement, which is more than double the original $12.5 million proposal. Drivers in California for ride-hailing service Lyft will stay independent contractors, but at least they will receive cash settlements, and the service will change some policies that affect drivers. [More]

Comcast Admits It Incorrectly Debited $1,775 From Account, Tells Me To Sort It Out With Bank

Knight725

Nearly two years after Consumerist reader Robert shut down his business-tier service with Comcast, he’s still fighting with the nation’s largest broadband provider over a $1,775 early termination fee that should not have been assessed. Comcast even admits the money shouldn’t have been debited from Robert’s bank account, but now says it’s his responsibility to sort the mess out with his bank. [More]

Adam Fagen

Lawsuit Against For-Profit Sanford Brown Institute Moves Forward, Despite Arbitration Clause

The highest court in New Jersey has ruled that a lawsuit filed by former students against for-profit educator Sanford Brown Institute can move forward, even though the school’s enrollment agreement has an arbitration clause that takes away students’ right to file such lawsuits.  [More]

Google Fiber Copies Comcast, AT&T; Forces Users To Give Up Their Legal Right To Sue

Discrete_Photography

Since its introduction in Kansas City, Google Fiber has presented itself as a disruptive force in the pay-TV and internet markets, offering high speeds for reasonable prices, and bringing new competition to markets generally dominated by a single provider. So it’s disappointing to learn that Fiber has decided to follow in the footsteps of AT&T, Comcast, Verizon, Time Warner Cable, and other reviled providers by quietly stripping its customers of their right to sue the company in a court of law. [More]

Michael

Proposed Rule Stops Colleges From Stripping Students Of Their Right To Sue

A recent study found that almost all of the nation’s largest for-profit college chains have enrollment agreements that block students from suing the school and prevent them from joining in class actions against these colleges. Following the 2015 bankruptcy and collapse of mega-chain Corinthian Colleges Inc., the sagging numbers at University of Phoenix, last week’s death knell for Brown Mackie College, and pending investigations and lawsuits against ITT and others, the Department of Education has decided that maybe these schools — which reap billions in federal aid each year — should probably have to be held accountable in a court of law when they screw students over. [More]

Alan Rappa

Amazon Goes After Third-Party Sellers For Buying, Creating Fake Reviews

Months after filing several lawsuits to block companies from selling fraudulent positive reviews on its site, Amazon is now turning its focus to those that purchase the fake reviews, taking action against one company and two individuals who sell on the e-commerce site.  [More]

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AT&T CEO Says He Can’t Deploy Robocall Blockers Without FCC Approval. He’s Wrong

On his personal phone line, AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson blocks unwanted, pre-recorded and auto-dialed robocalls. So why is Darth Randy not making this technology available for all of his customers? He claims it’s because he needs the FCC’s permission to do so, but the FCC says that just isn’t so. [More]