Equifax Says Site Vulnerability Behind Massive Breach; FTC Confirms Investigation

It’s been a week since credit reporting agency Equifax admitted it had lost sensitive personal data for 143 million American consumers — one of the worst data breaches yet. Now, the company says it knows how the intruders got in… and it’s through a bug that was first identified six months ago. [More]

Applecare+ Now More Expensive For Big Glass iPhones

On Monday, Apple announced a new batch of iPhones. What the next-generation iPhone 8 and the next-next-generation iPhone X in have in common is glass all around, on both front and back, making them extra slippery. Apple has raised the price of its Applecare+ extended warranty and limited accidental damage program for some users. [More]

175K Dressers Sold At Target Recalled For Tip-Over Hazard

Just a week after more than 1.6 million topple-prone dressers sold at Walmart were recalled, Target has issued a safety campaign of its own, recalling 175,000 potentially dangerous dressers. [More]

‘South Park’ Screws With Viewers’ Google Home, Echo Devices

Fans of the show South Park who watched the season premiere last night got more than the usual fart jokes and foul-mouthed rants: Amazon Echo and Google Home devices were woken up throughout the episode, triggered by commands from the characters. Of course, hilarity — or headaches, depending on your point of view — ensued. [More]

Did TransUnion Increase Cost Of Credit Monitoring In Wake Of Equifax Breach?

With more than 143 million consumers’ personal information now circulating on the dark web thanks to the massive Equifax data breach, there’s no doubt many of these victims are turning to the other two major credit bureaus — TransUnion and Experian — for credit freezes and monitoring services. But is one of these agencies cashing in on the Equifax hack by raising the price for its services? [More]

Don’t Let The Basic Economy Gate-Service Fee Catch You By Surprise

This year, airlines have introduced a new kind of fare, the “Basic Economy” ticket. Passengers with this ticket type board last and, on some airlines, only get to bring one carry-on item on board, paying the same fees as Economy travelers to check other luggage. Some passengers on United or American who didn’t read the fine print are getting hit with fees for bringing extra carry-on bags in addition to the fees for gate-checking those bags. [More]

Clowns Claim “It” Has Cut Into Business

Movies and television shows can increase the recognition of otherwise undervalued or appreciated business, industries, or hobbies. However, in the case of the new film It, clowns around the country say they’re losing business. [More]

69 Cheating Volkswagen Diesels Stolen From Silverdome Parking Lot

The cheating diesels that Volkswagen has bought back as part of its settlement with purchasers are sitting in vehicular purgatories across the country, waiting to be repaired so they can go to new homes. Only some of them were sprung early: 69 “Dieselgate” vehicles were stolen only to turn up with fake Michigan titles at an auto auction in Kentucky. [More]

It’s Not Just The U.S. — Equifax Security Issues Causing Headaches Around The World

We already know that more than 143 million Americans’ personal identify information was compromised as part of Equinox’s two-month-long data breach. If you thought that was bad enough, it gets worse: The credit reporting agency’s lax data security may have affected tens of millions more consumers across the world. [More]

Homeland Security Officially Bans All Federal Use Of Kaspersky Products

The federal government needs antivirus and malware protection at least as much as any other large organization, if not more. But now, after first stopping new purchases, and then asking private business to cut ties, the feds are officially blocking any government use of Kaspersky Lab products, citing security concerns over the company’s reported ties to the Kremlin. [More]

Nobody Knows What LaCroix “Essence” Is, Nobody Seems To Care

There’s no doubt that LaCroix — the comeback kid that transformed from the seltzer your mom drank to a ubiquitous libation treasured anew by the millennial gang — has amassed a dedicated following recently in the U.S. But that devotion doesn’t mean its fans know what the “essence” is in the carbonated drinks — and no one really seems to care. [More]

Is That Sardine-Style Coach Class Seating So Tight It’s Unsafe?

Everyone who flies, but who doesn’t have deep enough pockets to travel exclusively in first class, knows it: Airplanes are increasingly crowded and unpleasant. But is that frustrating lack of legroom actually endangering your life when you fly? [More]

This Startup Wants To Put Giant Minibars In Apartment Lobbies

You might call them bodegas, corner stores or convenience stores, but you’re probably familiar with that one locally owned store that has exactly what you need at the odd hour when you needed it. They’re more common in cities than elsewhere, but there’s a startup out to replace them entirely — with giant minibars. [More]

Department Of Homeland Security Sued Over Warrantless Searches Of Electronic Devices At The U.S. Border

Although it’s illegal for a police officer to search your electronic devices without a warrant — even after you’re arrested — the Department of Homeland Security says warrantless searches of digital content are allowed at any U.S. border. Privacy advocates and civil rights organizations are now suing the agency, claiming that border protection officers should also have a warrant before they’re allowed to search through residents’ laptops and phones. [More]

Marketers Of “Risk-Free” Golf, Kitchen Products Must Pay $2.5M To Settle Deceptive Marketing Claims

Six months after federal regulators accused a group of online marketers of promoting deceptive “free” and “risk-free” trials of golf and kitchen products, the companies have agreed to pay hefty fines and revamp their billing practices to settle the allegations.
[More]

Tourists Claim Marriott Rescue Ship Denied Them Boarding After Hurricane Irma

Earlier this week, several cruise lines sent ships to rescue people stranded on Caribbean islands after Hurricane Irma ravaged the area. Hotel mega-chain Marriott attempted to undertake a similar rescue mission to St. Thomas, but that effort has come under fire, after some stranded tourists claim they were denied boarding simply because they weren’t guests of the hotel.  [More]

Feds Release Guidelines For Self-Driving Cars, But Does It Really Matter Yet?

While we might dream of a day where we can sit behind the wheel of a vehicle reading a book or watching a movie, all while the car drives itself, that day remains many moons away. But here’s the thing about technology — it changes, and it changes quickly. To that end, federal safety regulators are working to ensure that carmakers create safe systems to prepare for the day that self-driving vehicles are actually on the road. There’s a catch, though: It’s all voluntary.  [More]

The Internet Thinks Denny’s New Mascot Looks Like Literal Crap

We have a question for Denny’s about its new hat-wearing sausage link mascot: What were you thinking? [More]