American Apparel Is Back, Offers Choice Of American Or Non-American Apparel

After Canadian company Gildan Activewear bought the American Apparel brand and the company’s assets in a bankruptcy auction, it said it would likely move some manufacturing outside of the U.S., in a big step away from the company’s founding mission. But the brand is back online now, and it’s offering shoppers a choice: Buy “Made in the USA” clothing, or shell out a few bucks less for identical “Globally Made” items. [More]

Dick’s Sporting Goods Hopes Discounted Prices Will Save It From Doom

Let’s take a moment to pay our respects to the dearly departed sporting good stores who have passed on in recent years: Sports Authority, Gander Mountain, Eastern Mountain Sports, Sport Chalet, Golfsmith and we’re probably missing a few. Dick’s Sporting Goods has fed on the bones of some of its former competitors, taking over their locations and inventory, but it still needs a plan to stave off the doom that consumed so many of its competitors. [More]

Why You Should Care About This Lawsuit Against A Data Company You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

Joe Gratz

The legal system has long taken a “no harm, no foul” approach to certain legal disputes: If you haven’t actually been injured by the other party’s actions, you’ll have a hard time convincing the court that your lawsuit shouldn’t be thrown out. But the internet, where incorrect information can be disseminated globally within seconds (and may never truly be erased), is causing courts to reconsider the question: When can you sue a company for an intangible harm? [More]

Chick-Fil-A Customer Claims Her Chicken Sandwich Had A Dead Mouse Baked Into The Bun

Although you might like a nice crunch in your chicken sandwich, one Chick-fil-A customer claims there was an unexpected texture baked into the bun of her sandwich: A dead mouse. [More]

Would You Pay $10 For Unlimited Monthly Movie Theater Visits?

Almost two decades ago, Netflix offered an appealing option to fine-weary movie lovers: Unlimited DVD rentals that customers could keep for as long as they wanted. A company run by one of the founders of Netflix is trying a similar tactic to get movie fans back into theaters by letting customers have unlimited visits for a flat fee. The cost: $10 per month, and signing over your movie habits to Big Data. [More]

DOJ Demands Company Turn Over Info On 1.3 Million Visitors To Anti-Trump Website

Since most of us aren’t looking at websites via a Tor connection, we’re leaving digital footprints all over the place. The sites you visit may have a surprising amount of information on you, even if you’re not logged in, and even if you went to that site inadvertently. That’s why the Justice Department is trying to compel a web-hosting company to turn over everything it knows about anyone who ever clicked on a site that is critical of President Trump. It’s also why that company is fighting against this demand. [More]

Taco Bell Has Decided To Inflict Taco With Fried Egg Shell On The Entire Country

Earlier this spring, Taco Bell continued its assault on the definition of “taco” by testing a new breakfast item in Michigan that involved putting stuff inside a fried egg and calling it a Naked Breakfast Taco. Now, the fast food giant is taking the item nationally.  [More]

Amazon’s New ‘Instant Pickup’ Service Should Just Be Called ‘Going To The Store’

Amazon’s New ‘Instant Pickup’ Service Should Just Be Called ‘Going To The Store’

Here’s the newest concept from Amazon: A place where customers can quickly pick up a snack or a roll of toilet paper without having to wait in long lines. It’s called “Instant Pickup,” but you might already know it by a more familiar name: “Going to the store.” [More]

Uber Settles Federal Allegations It Deceived Customers About Privacy & Data Security

Uber has reached a deal with the Federal Trade Commission to settle the government’s investigation into the ride-hailing service’s allegedly questionable privacy practices.
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Senators Ask FTC To Finalize The Contact Lens Rule Already

Readers who wear glasses or contact lenses may be surprised to learn that their doctor is supposed to give them a copy of their prescription without being asked, but it’s true. This is especially important for contact lens wearers, whose right to shop around and buy their lenses from any authorized vendor they like is protected by the Federal Trade Commission. Proposed rules would hold doctors even more accountable, requiring them to report to the FTC that they gave patients copies of their prescriptions. [More]

LinkedIn Can’t Block Third-Party Scanning Of Public Profiles To Identify Employees Most Likely To Leave

LinkedIn is trying to stop a third-party analytics firm from scanning publicly available profiles on the networking site with the purpose of identifying employees most likely to jump ship to a competitor. But a federal judge has granted an injunction against LinkedIn, saying the company appears to be misinterpreting the law in a way that “could profoundly impact open access to the Internet.” [More]

The #DeleteUber Campaign Led To 60% New User Bump For Lyft

Early this year, Uber found itself the target of a social media campaign urging people to #DeleteUber, prompted indirectly by a travel ban proposed by the federal government. Unsurprisingly, that movement has proved fruitful for the ride-hailing service’s biggest competitor, Lyft. [More]

Costco To Pay $19.4M To Tiffany & Co. For Selling Bogus ‘Tiffany’ Rings

Costco learned a very expensive lesson this week: A “Tiffany” ring is a specific product sold by a specific company; not just a generic name for any diamond engagement ring. Now the warehouse retailer must pay Tiffany & Company $19.4 million for marketing and selling “Tiffany” diamond rings that had nothing to do with the famed jewelry store. [More]

Southwest Promises To Fix Glitch That Scraps Priority Boarding For Frequent Fliers

Although there’s no first-class seating on Southwest Airlines, members in the top tiers of the carrier’s frequent flier program do get one important perk when it comes time to get on the plane: Priority boarding, which means that they’re usually among the first in line. But a recent glitch has taken that benefit away for many passengers lately, ticking a lot of them off in the process. [More]

Chick-fil-A Expands Breakfast Menu With Hash Brown Scramble Bowl, Burrito

Chick-fil-A lovers have long been able to order their favorite chicken sandwich in breakfast form via a biscuit. Now they can get it in bowl form, complete with hash browns.  [More]

Could Comcast Engineer A Mega Merger That Would Include 55 Million Customers?

Not so long ago, Comcast failed in its effort to merge with Time Warner Cable and create a cable/internet giant with around 30 million customers. But now that the regulatory winds have shifted in a decidedly pro-merger direction, some are theorizing what it would take for Comcast to engineer a telecom Voltron nearly double that size. [More]

Target Buys Shipping Tech Company To Speed Up Deliveries, Compete With Amazon

From drones to airplanes, and fleets of on-demand delivery drivers or employees making dropping off packages, many retailers — most notably Amazon — have begun dipping they toes in the logistics and delivery game. Now it’s Target’s turn, as the big box retailer has acquired a transportation tech firm with the intention of speeding up deliveries to customers. [More]

Check Your AirDrop Settings If You Don’t Want To Receive Pics Of Strangers’ Genitals

The iPhone’s AirDrop functionality is convenient, allowing users to quickly transfer files between devices. At the same time, a small number of perverts and pranksters are apparently taking advantage of AirDrop to share photos of their “junk” with complete strangers.
[More]