Body Health Atomic And Xplode Recalled For Banned Appetite Suppressant

Sibutramine, marketed as Meridia, was a weight loss drug on the market in the United States from 1997 to 2010, pulled from the market because it was linked to heart problems in patients. The drug is still available, it turns out: You just have to buy certain “herbal” weight loss supplements. Two of these supplements have now been recalled, since they contain undeclared prescription drugs. [More]

From Forbearance To Garnishments: 5 Things We Learned About Student Loan Debt Collection

Student loans are big business, both for private lenders and the federal government. And with $1.4 trillion dollars in education debt outstanding, it should come as no surprise that these companies and the government would want to recoup these costs. However, that often comes at a cost to borrowers, from those who have fallen on hard times, to those failing to receive proper notice and options from servicers, or those who believe they were defrauded by the educators who promised them a better life. [More]

Lyft Launching ‘Taco Mode’ To Enable Your Late-Night Taco Bell Craving

Anyone who’s ever begged and pleaded with their cab driver to take them to get fast food after a night on the town knows it’s not always an easy task. But Lyft apparently knows your darkest late-night desires, and is ready to be a Taco Bell accomplice. [More]

Uber Suspends Driver Accused Of Getting Busy During Customer’s Ride

Public displays of affection can be an awkward person for anyone not involved in the action. But one Uber passenger says his experience went from beyond uncomfortable to downright dangerous when his driver engaged in sexual activity with a woman during a trip. [More]

Michael Kors Goes Shoe Shopping, Buys Jimmy Choo For $1.3B

Nothing goes together quite like shoes and purses — just look in my closet. For that reason, it makes sense that two high-end accessory brands would be interested in becoming one: Despite closing stores and falling sales Michael Kors went shopping this week, placing Jimmy Choo in its shopping bag.  [More]

Microsoft: Don’t Worry, We’re Keeping MS Paint Because Nostalgia

Consumerist

When is the last time you used Microsoft Paint? It doesn’t really matter whether or not you actually want to, because you probably feel all warm and fuzzy when you think about using it to make (often crappy) drawings. That sense of nostalgia has worked its magic on Microsoft, which has announced it isn’t killing off the old program anytime soon. [More]

Four Things To Know About One Of The Largest Emergency Room Staffing Companies & Surprise Medical Bills

Opening your mailbox to a surprise bill of any kind isn’t typically a welcome experience. But when that bill is for thousands of dollars in medical care you once paid significantly less for, it’s even worse. Yet, that’s a scenario happening to more consumers as hospitals continue to contract out emergency room staffing, and one company appears to be driving the majority of costs.  [More]

Foxconn Considering A $7 Billion Flat Panel Factory In The United States

Foxconn may not be a household name, but the odds are pretty good that you’re reading this post on a device that the company made or assembled under contract for companies like Acer, Dell, and Apple. The Taiwanese company does most of its manufacturing in mainland China, but is considering building a $7 billion factory somewhere in the United States. [More]

United Airlines Says It “Misunderstood” TSA About Non-Existent Ban On Comic Books

Now that the Transportation Security Administration has called shenanigans on United Airlines’ claim that folks leaving last weekend’s San Diego Comic-Con could not stow their comics in their checked bags, the airline is admitting that it was wrong about this bizarre request being any sort of federal requirement. [More]

[Update] Okay, NOW What The Heck Is Going On With Senate Obamacare Replacement Bill?

Healthcare is the shambling zombie bill that simply will not stay dead. First the Senate was going to have a vote on a plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act; then it wasn’t. Then the Senate was considering a new proposal; then it wasn’t. Now, there is a vote on a bill tentatively planned for tomorrow, July 25 — but if it seems like nobody actually knows what’s in it, or who supports it, or what’s going on, well, that’s because basically nobody does.

So here’s what we do know. [More]

Don’t Use Social Media Behind The Wheel: 9 People Per Day Are Killed In Crashes Involving Distracted Drivers

Distracted driving comes in many forms, from talking on the phone, to messing with a navigation system, or posing for selfies on the latest social media app. Over the weekend, the latter distraction, combined with another dangerous driving hazard — drunk driving — to claim the life of a teen in California.  [More]

11 States Accuse Trump Administration Of Illegally Delaying Safety Regulations For Chemical Plants

The Environmental Protection Agency recently decided to put a nearly two-year delay on new rules intended to reduce the number and damage resulting from accidents at U.S. chemical plants that can result in deadly explosions, fires, and the release of poisonous gas. But the attorneys general for 11 states say the Trump administration has overstepped its authority with this decision. [More]

Fewer Restaurants Serving Up Sugary Drinks On Kids’ Menus, But Most Still Do

American kids are eating out at fast-food and full-service restaurants more than ever, and that makes it even more important what restaurants are serving to them. A new study of restaurant offerings by the Center for Science in the Public Interest shows that while they’re not as common as they were in the past, meals that include soda or other sugar-sweetened beverages are still common. [More]

Wells Fargo Accidentally Handed Over A Bunch Of Confidential Info On Its Rich Clients

After having a heckuva time dealing with backlash over its recent fake accounts fiasco, Wells Fargo has another debacle on its hands: A new report says a lawyer for the bank accidentally released a whole lot of confidential information about tens of thousands of its richest clients. [More]

Don’t Strip Consumers Of Their Right To A Day In Court, Say Advocates, Senators

Last week, bank-backed lawmakers revealed their plans to pass fast-track legislation that would undo the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s recently finalized rules that prevent banks and other financial institutions from stripping customers of their constitutional right to a day in court. Now, consumer advocates are urging the rejection of the legislation, expected to be voted on this week.  [More]

Sally Hansen And Revlon Fighting Over The Essential Nature Of A Gel Manicure

Gel nail polish is a product mostly available at salons that lets you keep a shiny-looking manicure for weeks on end. Companies that market nail polish to home users have tried to create long-lasting products that wear for weeks, too, but an ad watchdog has determined that the Sally Hansen brand is making claims that go too far. [More]

Feds Stop Using Kaspersky Antivirus Over Reported Russian Connection; States May Stick With It

Having an antivirus program and malware prevention suite on your computer is a good idea. A great idea, in fact. Everyone should have one, especially businesses and government agencies. But now one security company, Kaspersky Lab, is under fire for its Russian connections — leaving local, state, and federal agencies figuring out what to do next. [More]

Lawsuit Claims Lender Targeting Navajo Nation Deceived Customers On True Cost Of Tax Refund Anticipation-Like Loans

Nearly four years after tax refund anticipation loans were all but removed from tax preparation offices, similar costly financial products continue to be offered to many low-income consumers in need of a cash infusion before their tax refund actually hits the bank. This appears to be the case for a loan company accused of providing thousands of refund anticipation-like loans with hidden fees to people living in and around the Navajo Nation.  [More]