Mike Mozart and 
frankieleon

The Staples-Office Depot Merger Is Dead

The opinion issued today by U.S. District Court judge Emmet Sullivan doesn’t actually say that the country’s biggest office supply chain, Staples, can’t acquire the #2 office supply chain, Office Depot. As the Federal Trade Commission requested, the judge granted a preliminary injunction stopping the merger. That prevents the companies from merging until the FTC is done with their administrative antitrust case, but representatives of the two companies previously said that they would break the engagement if the FTC prevailed. [More]

NY DMV Issues Teen Learner’s Permit That Says He’s 116 Years Old

NY DMV Issues Teen Learner’s Permit That Says He’s 116 Years Old

If you want to feel old, ponder this: the teens now taking the roads as learners and as licensed drivers were born in the year 2000. Maybe the real surprise is that it took this long for populous New York state to accidentally issue a permit with an extra century tacked on to the driver’s age. [More]

Senators Call On FTC To Do Something About Misleading Fashion Sites

Senators Call On FTC To Do Something About Misleading Fashion Sites

It seems that someone in the offices of Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) or Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), or perhaps both senators, has either ordered clothing from a misleading China-based site or read Buzzfeed recently. Both senators announced today that they’ve sent a letter to Federal Trade Commission chair Edith Ramirez, urging the FTC to take action against sites that advertise great deals and don’t deliver what customers expected. [More]

RIAA Head: We’ll Never Have A Fair Deal With YouTube Under Current Copyright Law

RIAA Head: We’ll Never Have A Fair Deal With YouTube Under Current Copyright Law

Streaming video is the best medium for the delivery of music videos, but it’s also a great medium for posting pirated music videos and entire albums. That’s why the Recording Industry Association of America, record labels’ trade group, wants more money from YouTube for music videos that users watch. The problem, the group’s head explains, is that rampant piracy makes it impossible to negotiate with YouTube’s owner, Google. [More]

frankieleon

Hot Lotto Says Employee Fraud Didn’t Necessarily Affect Next Winner’s Prize

Last year, the man who used to be in charge of security for the Multi-State Lottery Assocation was convicted of rigging one of his employer’s games and buying himself the winning ticket. The winner of the next jackpot sued the Association, arguing that his own prize would have been bigger if the fraudulent win hadn’t happened. Is that true? The lottery group argues that it’s not. [More]

Matt DeTurck

Hey, Where’s My Check Or Coupons From That Starkist Tuna Lawsuit?

With canned tuna in the news due to a recent recall of Bumble Bee and Chicken of the Sea tuna, a few readers remembered the can under-filling class action that they filed claims in last year. One reader pointed out that it’s been a few months: shouldn’t the checks and free tuna vouchers be coming soon? Well… no. Not yet. [More]

JeepersMedia

Tax Software Uses Surge Pricing, Takes Advantage Of Later Filers

One of the many innovations that ride-hailing service Uber has given the world is that it popularized the phrase “surge pricing,” which means raising the price for something as demand for it goes up. Lots of industries do this, but filing taxes is something that everyone has to do. [More]

Town Officials Not Pleased With Man Who Patched Neighborhood Potholes Himself

Town Officials Not Pleased With Man Who Patched Neighborhood Potholes Himself

The problem isn’t necessarily that a man in Massachusetts went out and patched some holes in his street himself, at his own expense. The town prefers to use hot asphalt instead of the patching material he used. The core problem is that he happens be the sales manager for the company that sells that patching material. [More]

(John Hanley)

Live The Dream: Buy Your Own Doomsday Bunker In Northern Ireland

In Northern Ireland, northeast of Belfast, the country built a massive underground bunker big enough to hold 235 people. It was meant for the country’s elite to shelter themselves in the event of nuclear war. Its existence was only made public in 2007, and the government has decided to get rid of it. There’s a problem, though: it’s easy enough to sell government surplus filing cabinets or tanks, but what’s the market for 46,363 square feet of blastproof and windowless real estate? [More]

Tesla Sues Supplier Over Falcon-Wing Door Misrepresentations, Demands For Payment

Tesla Sues Supplier Over Falcon-Wing Door Misrepresentations, Demands For Payment

The super-cool, futuristic looking doors on Tesla’s Model X might be eye-catching, but they were apparently a source of consternation for the company and one of its suppliers, according to a new lawsuit.  [More]

(Frontline)

7 Things You Need To Know From Frontline’s Investigation On Supplements & Safety

They look like drugs, they’re regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, but Frontline‘s new investigation found that supplements are very, very different. [More]

Taxpayer Advocate Concerned About IRS Plans To Move More Support Online

Taxpayer Advocate Concerned About IRS Plans To Move More Support Online

It was just last week that we wrote about how this year will probably be better than last year for U.S. taxpayers with questions or problems. Yet looking forward to the next decade or so, changes in how the IRS provides support will mean leaving some Americans behind. [More]

Lumosity Ordered To Quit Claiming Their Games Make Users Smarter, Prevent Dementia

Lumosity Ordered To Quit Claiming Their Games Make Users Smarter, Prevent Dementia

Improving every day at a casual mobile or computer game might make you feel like you’ve accomplished something, but does it make you smarter? It’s possible, but if recent ads from Lumosity made you wonder how a company can legally claim that playing a simple game can help stave off Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, well, they can’t. As a result, Lumosity must pay $2 million to customers. There is also a court-ordered $50 million penalty involved, but that has been suspended because Lumosity doesn’t have the money to pay it. [More]

Musician Files $150M Lawsuit Against Spotify For Royalties

Musician Files $150M Lawsuit Against Spotify For Royalties

To make a song available on a streaming service like Spotify or Apple Music, the services negotiate with record labels and representatives of songwriters. David Lowery is a musician (best known for the bands Cracker and Camper Van Beethoven), a professor, and an activist for artists’ rights in the new music economy, and his latest effort is a class action lawsuit against Spotify for mechanical royalties. [More]

Mike Mozart

Cheerios Protein Has Slightly More Protein, More Sugar Than Regular Cheerios

If you follow current food trends, you know that Americans are losing interest in breakfast cereal, but can’t get enough protein. Cereal companies see those trends, and are ready to respond with new products to entice customers back to their aisle. For example, General Mills started a line called Cheerios Protein to supplement their classic Cheerios. The problem: while Cheerios Protein has more protein per serving, it also has a lot more sugar. [More]

(Erik H)

Lumber Liquidators Pleads Guilty To Selling Hardwood From Endangered Big Cat Habitats

Lumber Liquidators has officially pleaded guilty to violations of the Lacey Act, a law that bans illegally-harvested animal and plant products, including trees, from sale in the United States. It turns out that the offending hardwoods were illegally harvested because they were in forests in eastern Russia that are home to two species of endangered wild cats: the Amur leopard and the Siberian tiger. [More]

(Consumerist Dot Com)

Contractor Accepts $7,500 In Payments, Disappears

When you hire a contractor and they do a competent job, you should be able to just hire that contractor again without checking their background and starting the process over. Right? Not so fast, as one person who aspired to have new doors installed in his home learned the hard way. He hired back a contractor he had used in the past without checking any licenses, and paid about $7,500 for his mistake. [More]

Not an actual child's fruit cup, but tasty. (Steve R.)

Federal Program To Feed Poor Kids Fresh Fruit And Vegetables Is Actually Controversial

The federal Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program means that kids in high-poverty schools receive cups of fresh fruits and vegetables every day, starting kids on what program boosters hope will be a lifelong habit of thinking of fresh produce as valid and delicious snacks. Who could possibly object to that? Lobbyists for the frozen, canned, and dried fruit industries. [More]