Ray J./Morton Fox

Verizon Acquisition Of Yahoo Still Going Ahead As Planned

Since the announcement of data breaches consisting of 1.5 billion Yahoo accounts, Yahoo-watchers have had one question: what’s going to happen to the former internet titan’s agreement to sell its internet operations to Verizon for a mere $4.8 billion? In its quarterly and annual earnings report today, Yahoo announced that the deal is still on. It’s just taking a while. [More]

FCC.gov

Net Neutrality Foe Ajit Pai Officially Named FCC Chairman

As expected, President Trump has elevated Ajit Pai from his FCC Commissioner to Chairman, clearly establishing that the new administration seeks to undo the telecommunications regulations of the previous White House. [More]

Feds: No Proof That ‘Breathometer’ Blood Alcohol Content Test Actually Works

Feds: No Proof That ‘Breathometer’ Blood Alcohol Content Test Actually Works

The Breathometer promised to be a pocket-sized law-enforcement-grade device that could be used to accurately measure blood alcohol levels to determine if the user is sober enough to drive. It’s a good enough idea that it won over the panel on Shark Tank, but according to federal regulators, the only thing you can definitely say about this device is that it does fit in your pocket. [More]

Chris Rief aka Spodie Odie

Study: Baseball Teams More Likely To Have A Bad Game Due To Jet Lag When Flying East

Playing at least 81 games on the road, sometimes thousands of miles from home and in a different time zone, will eventually have an effect on even the most fit professional baseball player, but is there a correlation between distance (and direction) traveled and performance? [More]

Should Microsoft Be Allowed To Tells Its Users When Government Searches Their Data?

lonewolf

If the police serve a search warrant on your home, you know, but if law enforcement searches your cloud-stored files, you’ll probably have no idea — and companies like Microsoft are currently forbidden from telling you. That’s why the tech giant is suing the Justice Department, but can Microsoft even bring this lawsuit? [More]

Some Uber Drivers Sleep In Their Cars So They Can Work In Expensive Cities

Some Uber Drivers Sleep In Their Cars So They Can Work In Expensive Cities

If you want to be successful at driving for Uber, Lyft or some similar service, it’s important to not only put in a lot of hours behind the wheel, but to do so in a city where you’re likely to also have a passenger in the backseat. Problem is, dense urban areas where residents have disposable income may be out of your price range. Some drivers are getting around this by spending their brief downtime sleeping in their cars. [More]

JeepersMedia

Here’s How You Can Get A Free Burger At Shake Shack

If you’re the kind of person who prefers free food over food you have to pay for — and who isn’t? — we’ve got some good news for you: in a bid to woo customers into downloading its new mobile app, Shake Shack is offering customers a free burger. [More]

Federal Judge Blocks $37 Billion Merger Of Aetna & Humana

Federal Judge Blocks $37 Billion Merger Of Aetna & Humana

Six months after the U.S. Department of Justice and attorneys general from eight states and the District of Columbia sued to stop the merger of insurance giants Aetna and Humana, the federal judge in the case has blocked the deal from moving forward. [More]

Morton Fox

All-Day Breakfast Boosts McDonald’s, But Can’t Save The Company Alone

The golden days of the All-Day Breakfast Boom may have passed. No, nothing is happening to your afternoon McMuffin, but the sales surge created by offering breakfast at any time has waned in the U.S. So what’s next? [More]

MartinRottler

Senator Takes Aim At American Airlines For Charging Extra For Access Overhead Bins

Odds are, if an airline finds a way to charge travelers yet another add-on fee, New York Sen. Charles Schumer will be close behind, expressing his displeasure. This time, the lawmaker has American Airlines’s new Basic Economy fare in his sights. [More]

Renee Rendler-Kaplan

Price Of Salmon Spiking Amid Recent Sea Lice Outbreaks

The next time you’re looking to add some lox to your bagel or perhaps make salmon en papillote, you may have to fork over a bit more cash than before. Salmon populations are down amid recent “acute” outbreaks of sea lice, driving prices upstream. [More]

Yahoo

Did Yahoo Wait Too Long To Disclose Massive 2014 Data Breach? SEC Investigating

Yahoo, the online company that hosted your email in 2001, was the victim of two huge account breaches in 2013 and 2014, but didn’t tell customers or investors until last year. Now the Securities and Exchange Commission is one of the government entities investigating the breach, to find out whether Yahoo kept the info from its investors for too long. [More]

Sprint Buying 33% Of Jay Z’s Tidal Streaming Music Service

Sprint Buying 33% Of Jay Z’s Tidal Streaming Music Service

Sprint is lagging behind T-Mobile and the rest of the U.S. wireless field, while Jay Z’s artist-friendly Tidal streaming service has not been able to catch up to Spotify and other competitors; so why not team up? [More]

Bernal Saborio G. (berkuspic)

Computer Glitch Grounds All United Planes, Snarling Travel Plans For Many

Many United Airlines travelers found their planes grounded in the U.S. last night due to a computer glitch that kept all the carrier’s domestic flights from flying for about an hour. As is often the case in these situations, a lot of those people were pretty annoyed by the disruption. [More]

Sierra Nevada

Sierra Nevada Issues Beer Recall In 35 States Because Glass Is Not Part Of An IPA

Whether or not you like an India Pale Ale or a hoppy beer is a matter of personal taste, but glass is never supposed to be part of a cool beverage. Unfortunately, thanks to a manufacturing defect, it’s possible that some could end up in a variety of Sierra Nevada beers, and so the company has issued a massive recall of recently-bottled beer spanning 35 states and DC. [More]

Samsung Investigation Reveals New Details About Note7 Battery Failures

Samsung

Samsung says two different battery flaws were to blame for the fires that plagued its flagship Galaxy Note7 smartphone throughout the fall, leading to two separate recalls and, ultimately, the permanent withdrawal of the model from the market. The details are being released after an internal investigation, following weeks of speculation by reporters and analysts about what the company’s report would conclude. [More]

Chris Wilson

Trump Executive Order Directs Federal Agencies To Scale Back Obamacare; Could Remove Individual Mandate

One of President Trump’s first acts in the Oval Office on Friday was to sign an executive order directing federal agencies to scale back on enforcing and implementing the Affordable Care Act wherever they can, while the new administration and Congress work on dismantling the 2010 law. [More]