Uber President Leaving Company After Just Six Months

It’s been a rough couple of months for Uber, with the brief-but-viral #DeleteUber campaign, and the company’s CEO being caught on camera berating one of his own drivers. Now comes news that Uber President Jeff Jones is exiting the company after less than a year on the job.

Recode reports that Jones, who joined the company just six months ago, decided to leave the company over a difference in Uber’s approach to leadership.

“I joined Uber because of its Mission, and the challenge to build global capabilities that would help the company mature and thrive long-term,” Jones tells Recode. “It is now clear, however, that the beliefs and approach to leadership that have guided my career are inconsistent with what I saw and experienced at Uber, and I can no longer continue as president of the ride sharing business.”

While Jones didn’t point to specific incidents that lead to his departure, sources tell Recode the decision to leave was closely related to the ride-hailing company’s recent public controversies, including a blog post by a former female engineer that accused the company of fostering an environment of sexism and harassment.

Additionally, the company has also come under fire for its reported use of a tool that allows it to avoid regulation and law enforcement. The company has since said it would stop using the tool.

Sources tell Recode that Jones simply doesn’t like conflict, and that was apparently brewing at the ride-hailing company.

CEO Kalanick also confirmed Jones’ exit in a note to staff, obtained by Recode.

The letter suggests that Jones, who previously worked for Target, made the decision to leave after Kalanick announced that he would look to hire a Chief Operating Officer.

“It is unfortunate that this was announced through the press but I thought it was important to send all of you an email before providing comment publicly,” Kalanick wrote, noting that in six months, Jones had made an “important impact” on the company.

During his short tenure with the company, Recode reports that Jones spent time meeting with drivers to determine what the company could do better.