Lawsuit Asks FDA To Regulate Sperm-Damaging Antimicrobial Soap Chemicals

Lawsuit Asks FDA To Regulate Sperm-Damaging Antimicrobial Soap Chemicals

Thirty years ago, the FDA considered regulating two toxic chemicals that can damage reproductive organs, sperm quality, and hormone production. Rather than do something, the agency instead did nothing. Last week, the National Resources Defense Council sued the agency, asking them to finally finish the job and regulate the chemicals triclosan and triclocarban. [More]

You Still Can't Trust Trust Sunscreen SPF, Waterproof Claims

You Still Can't Trust Trust Sunscreen SPF, Waterproof Claims

Sunscreen makers can say almost anything they want about their product’s sun protection factor or water fighting ability because the FDA’s sunscreen regulations are a just a teensy bit late. Well, they’re actually thirty-two years late, but the FDA swears that they’re going to publish final regulations by October. Except maybe not. So what can consumers do in the meantime? [More]

New Med Schools Cropping Up To Deal With Impending Elderly Boom

New Med Schools Cropping Up To Deal With Impending Elderly Boom

Note to Baby Boomers: You might dress, look and behave significantly more youthful than your forebears, but you are still getting older. That inexorably means retirement and declining health. Unfortunately, a ton of the doctors currently practicing will be retiring along with you. The solution? More medical schools to churn out more M.D.s. [More]

NYC Wants You To Eat Less Salt

NYC Wants You To Eat Less Salt

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg wants you to be healthy. First it was calorie counts on menu boards — now he’s going after salt in packaged and restaurant foods. It seems less likely this initiative will lead to an actual law, but you never know, so here we go… [More]

Your COBRA Subsidy Is Ending, What Now?

Your COBRA Subsidy Is Ending, What Now?

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) provided a 65% reduction in premiums for health benefits under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985, which you probably know as COBRA. Now the benefits are ending for the first wave of unemployed people who signed up at the beginning of the program. [More]

Does Posting Calorie Counts On Menus Sway Consumers?

Does Posting Calorie Counts On Menus Sway Consumers?

Starting last year, fast food restaurants in New York City were required to list the total calories of every item on the menu. The idea was to provide greater transparency for consumers so that they can make smarter choices. Has it worked? Professors at New York University and Yale have completed a study that shows that the labeling makes consumers think they’re being healthier, but in fact they’re ordering more total calories than before the law went into effect.

Homes With Cats 8 Times More Likely To Contain MRSA

Homes With Cats 8 Times More Likely To Contain MRSA

You may have thought you could only get MRSA at hospitals and the beach, but apparently researchers have discovered that it can be transmitted via pets and lead to repeat infections, reports the New York Times. One recent case involved a baby elephant and 20 human caretakers at the San Diego Zoo last year, but at the domestic level it looks like cats (and dogs, but not to the same degree) somehow contribute to cycle of infection at home.

Cut Back On Sugar, Says American Heart Association

Cut Back On Sugar, Says American Heart Association

The American Heart Association says we’re eating way too much extra sugar, meaning sugar that doesn’t naturally occur in our foods. The average American consumes 22 teaspoons a day. By contrast, the average woman should eat no more than 6 teaspoons daily, while the average man, owing most likely to his increased awesomeness, should eat no more than 9 teaspoons a day. [Eats another teaspoon of sugar before resuming typing.]

CVS Will Automatically Refill Your Prescription, Consent Be Damned

CVS Will Automatically Refill Your Prescription, Consent Be Damned

CVS pharmacies apparently don’t need consent to enroll customers in ReadyFill, a program that signs customers up for the maximum allowable number of prescription refills and then robocalls them when their drugs are ready. According to a veteran pharmacist, the automatic enrollments began after CVS’ corporate office set specific performance targets that would affect bonuses for managers and pharmacists. Inside, the pharmacist tells us what ReadyFill is, how it works, and how to escape those annoying robocalls…

What Does Health Care Reform Mean For You?

What Does Health Care Reform Mean For You?

The debate over health care reform has devolved into scaremongering with death panels and rationed care. What’s really going on, and what does it really mean for you and your family? Inside, the New York Times breaks down the competing bills…

Make Your Own Sports Drink

Make Your Own Sports Drink

Why waste money on Gatorade when you can brew an equally effective sports drink from sugar, lemon juice, salt and orange juice? Hit the jump for the simple, inexpensive recipe.

The One Question To Ask Before Buying Fitness Equipment

The One Question To Ask Before Buying Fitness Equipment

Are you motivated? Because if you’re not, don’t bother. Put down your credit card, walk away from the pretty advertisements, you’re just going to waste money. Seem overly simplistic? Maybe it is, but it’s a reality most of us don’t have the courage to face. Paul Michael over at Wise Bread offers up his own story as proof…

Subway Worker Wonders Why You Would Eat Their "Disgusting" Food

Subway Worker Wonders Why You Would Eat Their "Disgusting" Food

John visited his local Rhode Island Subway every weekday for the past two months to enjoy what he thought was a healthy lunch. That all came to end after he overheard a Subway worker say to her colleague: “I don’t know how anybody could eat this stuff everyday. It’s disgusting and it will make you fat.”

Scientists Agree: Denny's Is Dangerous

Scientists Agree: Denny's Is Dangerous

Denny’s entrees are loaded with dangerous amounts of salt, according to a class action suit filed by the Center for Science in the Public Interest. The CDC recommends consuming no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium each day, but some Denny’s entrees contain a whopping 5,500 milligrams.

U.S. Balks At Prospect Of Imported Chinese Chickens

U.S. Balks At Prospect Of Imported Chinese Chickens

China is itching to sell their processed chickens directly to the U.S. market, an idea that doesn’t exactly thrill our regulators or representatives. Congress banned the import of processed Chinese chickens in 2007, ruffling Beijing’s feathers to the point where they’re now considering a retaliatory ban on U.S. chickens. Since we’re in a recession and Congress doesn’t want domestic chicken exporters to lose over a half-billion dollars next year, they may let the Chinese chickens come here to roost.

Now In Farmed Fish: Mad Cow Disease?!

Now In Farmed Fish: Mad Cow Disease?!

Three scientists worry that feeding cow parts to farmed fish could expose seafood consumers to mad cow disease. The scientists published their findings in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and called on the government to ban cow meat and bone meal from appearing in fish feed.

Radioactive Chinese Drywall Is Stinking Up U.S. Homes

Radioactive Chinese Drywall Is Stinking Up U.S. Homes

The government thinks radioactive industrial waste from China is responsible for a recent sulfur stench that has plagued hundreds of Florida homes. Demand for Chinese drywall spiked during the housing boom, but federal regulators believe the drywall contained phosphogypsum, a banned waste byproduct that features prominently in Chinese construction. When used in drywall, the probable carcinogen can corrode “air conditioners, mirrors, electrical outlets and even jewelry.”

Need An Ambulance? If You're Overweight, It's Going To Cost An Extra $543

Need An Ambulance? If You're Overweight, It's Going To Cost An Extra $543

An ambulance ride with American Medical Response in Topeka, Kansas will soon cost an extra $543 for folks weighing 350 pounds or more. Though AMR already owns cots that can support up to 500 pounds, they claim that because of rising demand from so-called “bariatric patients,” they now need to buy winches and “extra large and reinforced cots.”