(Sister72)

Firefox Breaks Up With Google, Makes Yahoo The Browser’s Default Search Engine

Right now, Google is probably on the couch wrapped in blankets with The Notebook on repeat, eyeballs deep in a trough of chocolate ice cream. Mozilla dumped Google this week after three years together, as Firefox’s default search engine, and has decided to go steady with Yahoo instead. [More]

Results for four of the 39 services currently evaluated on the EFF's Secure Messaging Scorecard.

Secure Messaging Scorecard Shows Just How Unprotected Your Online Chats Are

The Internet is a place where hundreds of millions of people go to write things they wouldn’t — or can’t — say in public, and many of the most private and secretive communications occur via the many instant messaging services available to consumers. But what you may not realize when sharing your personal thoughts (and images) with someone online is that the level of privacy and security on these services varies wildly from one to the next. [More]

IRS Turning Its Baleful Gaze At Company Cafeterias That Churn Out Free Food

(toonbobo)

Do you hear that noise? It’s thousands of forks clattering in the hands of Silicon Valley employees currently enjoying a free lunch. The Internal Revenue Service is taking a closer look at the trend of company cafeterias shoveling free food onto employees’ plates, saying that smorgasbord is a taxable fringe benefit. [More]

Ch-ch-changes...

Yahoo Ditching Google, Facebook Logins For Flickr Accounts By End Of The Month

After announcing in March that it would phase out third-party logins for photo-sharing site Flickr, Yahoo says it’ll be killing off Google and Facebook logins on June 30. That means you’ll need a Yahoo account to sign in and access your photos. [More]

Amazon, Google, Reddit, Netflix, 4Chan, Dozens Others, Plead With FCC To Protect Net Neutrality

(Chris Harrell)

In perhaps the most motley crew (as opposed to Mötley Crüe) of tech and Internet companies ever assembled for a single cause, around 150 businesses representing everything from content and infrastructure to gaming, crowdfunding and 3-D printing have written the FCC to ask that it not completely screw up net neutrality. [More]

Not a happy heart.

What Is This Scary Heartbleed Bug, And Why Is Everyone Freaking Out About It?

One second everything on the Internet appears normal, and the next thing you know, everyone is talking about some security bug called “Heartbleed” that’s out to get us all. So what is it, and is it as scary of a problem as it seems to be? [More]

(Morton Fox)

Yahoo Announces New Security Measures To Keep Snoopers From Snooping

If security is a blanket, Yahoo is trying to roll itself up in more layers of that blanket to make a nice little cocoon for its users, designed to keep the government and others from snooping. Following Google’s recent new security measures, Yahoo says it’s also completed a new system that encrypts all info going from one Yahoo data center to another. [More]

Comcast, Abercrombie, Chase Victorious In First Day Of Worst Company Competition!

Comcast, Abercrombie, Chase Victorious In First Day Of Worst Company Competition!

The 2014 Worst Company In America competition got off to a big start today with readers turning out in droves to vote on the tournament’s first three match-ups that saw a former Golden Poo champ flexing its muscle, a tournament mainstay making its case for the WCIA title, and the year’s first upset. [More]

Have Fun Breaking Down This Year’s Worst Company In America Bracket

Have Fun Breaking Down This Year’s Worst Company In America Bracket


The above bracket will be updated at the end of each day of WCIA competition to reflect that day’s results.
——————

After going through all of your nominations, then having y’all rank the contenders and eliminate the chaff from the wheat, we’re proud to present the first round match-ups for this year’s Worst Company in America tournament! [More]

Here Are Your Worst Company Contenders For 2014 — Help Us Seed The Brackets!

Here Are Your Worst Company Contenders For 2014 — Help Us Seed The Brackets!

After sorting through a mountain of nomination e-mails, we’ve whittled down the field of competitors for this year’s Worst Company In America tournament to 40 bad businesses. Here’s your chance to have your say on how these players will square off in the bracket, and which bubble teams will get left out in the cold. [More]

UK Spy Agency Snooped On Yahoo Cam Chats, Including The Nude Ones

UK Spy Agency Snooped On Yahoo Cam Chats, Including The Nude Ones

With help from their pals at the National Security Agency the British intelligence agents at the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) spent two years swiping still frames from millions of Yahoo webcam chats between people who weren’t suspects in any crimes or terrorist activities, according to leaked government documents. [More]

Is Yahoo Triple-Billing You For Your Old Flickr Pro Account?

Is Yahoo Triple-Billing You For Your Old Flickr Pro Account?

While Yahoo’s photo sharing site Flickr now offers free users a reasonably hefty 1TB of storage, it didn’t use to be so generous, and the only way around those old limits was to upgrade to a Pro account for $25/year. When Flickr stopped offering the Pro tier last spring, Yahoo grandfathered in existing Pro accounts at the same rate. But if you’re still paying for Flickr Pro, you may want to keep an eye on your bank statement when it comes time to renew your account. [More]

Great, Now Yahoo E-mail Addresses & Passwords Have Been Stolen

Great, Now Yahoo E-mail Addresses & Passwords Have Been Stolen

In news that makes you long for the days of handwritten correspondence, Yahoo has announced that usernames and passwords for an unspecified number of users have been compromised. [More]

Feds To Allow Tech Companies To Provide More Transparent Info On Data Requests

Feds To Allow Tech Companies To Provide More Transparent Info On Data Requests

While a number of the largest websites and telecom companies have recently published transparency data detailing the number of data requests made about consumers, these companies have been very limited with regard to what they could say about federal requests that fall under the header of national security. In response to a call for more transparency from several major Internet businesses, the government is changing its restrictions. [More]

Some Yahoo Users Enter Day 2 Of E-Mail Outage

Some Yahoo Users Enter Day 2 Of E-Mail Outage

It used to be that being locked out of your e-mail for a day or two was no big hardship. Now our e-mail boxes are lifelines to finding and performing work, receiving financial documents and paying bills, and sometimes even staying in contact with people. Some Yahoo Mail users are not pleased that the sudden “scheduled maintenance” of Yahoo Mail has locked them out of their accounts since Sunday night. [More]

Yahoo Won’t Let Me Reclaim My Old E-Mail, Hasn’t Purged It Either

Yahoo Won’t Let Me Reclaim My Old E-Mail, Hasn’t Purged It Either

Ben was caught in the Great Yahoo Purge of 2013. The company figures that you’re not going to come back for the webmail address that you registered in 1999, and decided to “reclaim” usernames that hadn’t been used in a very long time for reuse. The problem was that Ben’s ID was still in the system, but not available for him to sign in to. [More]

Even Yahoo Employees Want Nothing To Do With Yahoo Mail

Even Yahoo Employees Want Nothing To Do With Yahoo Mail

If you’re one of the many Yahoo users (Yahoosers?) who hasn’t been terribly impressed with the numerous recent “upgrades” to the web giant’s e-mail service, you’re not alone, especially in the Yahoo offices, were 3-out-of-4 employees have apparently decided to just stick with Microsoft Outlook, in spite of the company’s pleas to switch. [More]

Google Mocks Opacity Of National Security Requests While Feds Try To Hide Court Action From Public

In a transparency report from last year, Google thumbed its nose at the federal laws that limit what can be said about national security requests.

For quite some time, Google and other Internet biggies have argued that they should be able to reveal relatively detailed data to the public about user-information requests from federal law enforcement agencies, and specifically those that fall under that black umbrella of national security. In its latest transparency report, Google uses a visual to show its distaste for this opacity. Meanwhile, the federal government is attempting to argue its case for the lack of transparency behind doors closed so tight that even the others involved in the request won’t be privy to what’s said. [More]