(Listener42)

Company Touting Work-From-Home Opportunities Must Pay $25M To Consumers Who Made No Money

Here are a few clues that the employment “opportunity” you received in that email is a scam: 1) you’re required to pay your new employer hundreds of dollars for a starter kit or computer program; 2) once that program was purchased you’re encouraged to buy more programs for thousands of dollars; and 3) your new employer promises that you’ll be able to make thousands of dollars in a short period of time without ever leaving your couch. That’s about how it worked for a company the Federal Trade Commission recently ordered to repay consumers $25 million. [More]

Work-At-Home Scams On The Rise; Here's How To Spot Them

Work-At-Home Scams On The Rise; Here's How To Spot Them

With so many people out of work, questionable-sounding work-at-home jobs that would have once been looked at with a wary eye are now the last resort for many cash-strapped Americans. But as more people are finding out, many work-at-home jobs are not the income generators they promise, and some are downright scams. [More]

No, You Can't Get Rich Quick Via Twitter

No, You Can't Get Rich Quick Via Twitter

The Better Business Bureau warns job-hunters and other money-seekers that no, you can’t earn massive amounts of money through secretive Twitter tricks.

Work-At-Home Schemes Continue To Hook The Hapless

Work-At-Home Schemes Continue To Hook The Hapless

Consumer Reports took a look at some popular work-at-home schemes, and found that you could actually make money with some of them … sort of:

"Tiny Details" Owner Sends Miniature Threats To Former Customer

"Tiny Details" Owner Sends Miniature Threats To Former Customer

Tiny Details is a work-at-home company that pays hobbyists to make little dollhousey things. You buy the materials from Tiny Details for $55, make the assigned object(s), and Tiny Details buys them back. Unfortunately, many customers have complained about problems getting payments or refunds from the company over the years—here’s their less-than-stellar BBB entry. Yesterday Kristopher Buchan, the owner of Tiny Details, emailed one former customer/client to tell him his complaints amounted to libel. Buchan demanded the customer remove them from teh interweb, and threatened him repeatedly with a lawsuit. And now we’re posting about it on The Consumerist! See how that works, Tiny Details?