(Your Protagonist)

Safeway’s “Gluten Free” Shelf Labels Could Use Some Work

We commend Safeway for making it easier for customers with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity to find products that they can eat on the store shelves. However, it’s probably not such a good idea to just go around printing any old shelf tags on the “Gluten Free” paper once you run out of other paper. [More]

Kroger: Where "Gluten-Free" Means "May Contain Wheat"

Kroger: Where "Gluten-Free" Means "May Contain Wheat"

People with food allergies or sensitivities know that no matter what the colorful claims on the front of a food’s package might be, you still need to chEck the ingredients. Briana writes that her recent experience at Kroger brought this point home. The front of a chicken broth carton declared the product to be “gluten-free,” but the side of the package said “may contain wheat.” Which is it? While food packaging might brag that its contents are gluten-free, such labels aren’t yet regulated by the FDA. In the case of Briana and Kroger, this led to some confusion. [More]

Get Out Your $#%@# Checkbook! Here Comes "Food Inflation"

Get Out Your $#%@# Checkbook! Here Comes "Food Inflation"

Think you’re paying too much for food now? You’re going to pay more in 2008 according to Reuters.

Tainted Chinese Product Was "Wheat Flour" And It Was Also Fed To Fish

Tainted Chinese Product Was "Wheat Flour" And It Was Also Fed To Fish

We’ve decided to take a week off and let the chemical melamine write the blog, because our feeble minds can not comprehend the extent of the contamination that has entered our food supply. Today’s news is that it is not “wheat gluten” that contaminated the pet food that has killed thousands and thousands of pets, but “wheat flour.” What’s more, the wheat flour was also used as food for fish that were meant for human consumption.

Pet Food Recall: Was Some Human Food Tainted?

Pet Food Recall: Was Some Human Food Tainted?

“To date, we have nothing that indicates it’s gone into human food,” said Dorothy Miller , director of the FDA’s Office of Emergency Operations . “We have a bit more investigation to do.”

Yep, lots more investigating. —MEGHANN MARCO