(Adam Fagen)

United Offers “Bug Bounty” Of Up To 1 Million Miles For Hackers Who Find Vulnerabilities In Website, Mobile App

While big companies are known to quietly seek out the services of white-hat hackers to test for weaknesses in their networks and websites, it’s not every day that a major airline publicly offers a “bounty” to people who can diagnose vulnerabilities in its systems. [More]

(Steven Depolo)

You Can Soon Buy “.Sucks” URLs, But At Prices That .Suck

If you’ve ever dreamed of using the recently approved .sucks top-level domain suffix to make fun of companies that annoy you, your chance is coming up when registration opens later this month. However, a .sucks domain won’t exactly come cheap, so be prepared to be outbid by the company you’d love to skewer. [More]

(So Cal Metro)

Frontier’s New Reservation System Proving To Be A Headache For Travelers

There are bound to be a few hiccups when a company changes software for a program that is integral to business. But customers say the transition for Frontier Airlines’ new reservation system has been full of turbulence. [More]

Park-N-Fly And OneStopParking Confirm Suspected Breaches

Park-N-Fly And OneStopParking Confirm Suspected Breaches

After looking at the transactions on compromised credit cards, security experts at banks suspected that breaches may have occurred at two airport parking companies: the suspected breaches at Park-N-Fly and OneStopParking. Both companies have since confirmed that they were breached, but that doesn’t mean that the same person or group targeted both companies. [More]

Tumblr Copies Facebook, Experiences Outage

UPDATE: Tumblr is back. That was a grueling half hour or so, wasn’t it? Tumblr’s official Twitter account announced the end of the outage, though they failed to explain what happened. There was no error message for many users: they simply couldn’t load the site. [More]

Apply For A Quicken Loans FHA Mortgage: No FHA Products Allowed

Apply For A Quicken Loans FHA Mortgage: No FHA Products Allowed

The Federal Housing Administration insures mortgages, which makes it easier and more affordable for people to buy homes. That’s good. Quicken Loans happens to be an FHA lender, which is also good. What’s kind of confusing, though, is how the web page where you start your FHA loan application explicitly exempts FHA loans. Sort of. [More]

IKEA’s Website Hates Me And I Don’t Know Why

IKEA’s Website Hates Me And I Don’t Know Why

Rob really likes IKEA. IKEA doesn’t seem to have any strong feelings about Rob, but the store’s web site hates him. They don’t want to do business with him. It’s nothing personal, surely, but the web site believes that he doesn’t exist, and not even anyone at IKEA has ben able to figure out why this is or what to do about it. [More]

Protect Your Brand From Becoming A .XXX Domain

Protect Your Brand From Becoming A .XXX Domain

Recently the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), who are the guys who decide all sorts of things about how website addresses work, approved the creation of a new .xxx domain. It’s intended for the adult entertainment industry, but brands have only until October 28th to act before fleshpot slingers start using addresses like mcdonalds.xxx and johndeere.xxx to steal traffic. [More]

OpenTable Rewards Loyalty, Refunds Loyalty Points After
Coupon Expires

OpenTable Rewards Loyalty, Refunds Loyalty Points After Coupon Expires

As a frequent user of online reservation service OpenTable, Ben’s girlfriend had earned a fair number of loyalty points. She turned these in for a $50 voucher, which she promptly forgot to use. Oh, well, her loss, right? Not exactly. [More]

Web Analytics Firm, 20 Clients Sued For Web Tracking

Web Analytics Firm, 20 Clients Sued For Web Tracking

There’s big business in tracking web browsing, and temptation to grab more information than is legally acceptable. A lawsuit alleges a web analytics company and its clients stepped over the line in snooping on browsing habits, particularly of those who try to cover their tracks. [More]

How The Biggest Sites Are Stalking You And Reselling Your Info

How The Biggest Sites Are Stalking You And Reselling Your Info

Most websites you visit are monitoring your behavior, even after you leave. They install little files like cookies, beacons, and flash cookies to see where you go, what you buy, even what text you’re typing. WSJ analyzed the tracking behavior of the top 50 websites online to see how each of them is watching your every step, and then reselling the info to the highest bidder. For instance, did you know that Dictionary.com gives its users up to 159 cookies, 23 flash cookies and 41 beacons for third parties? [More]

Best Buy Store Flat Out Says They're Not Gonna Price Match Their Website

Best Buy Store Flat Out Says They're Not Gonna Price Match Their Website

There’s no more pussyfooting around the bush. Reader Daniel snapped a picture of this sign on the front door of his local Best Buy of a sign that just comes right out and says, hey, if you want the price shown on the Best Buy website, we’ll be happy to sell you a computer that will connect to bestbuy.com so you can order it there and have it shipped to your house or held for in-store pickup. Ok, it doesn’t really say all that, but it does say that they’re not going to bother honoring the prices shown on the website within the store at all. [More]

Nielsen Partners With Facebook, Other Websites To Measure Ad Views Online

Nielsen Partners With Facebook, Other Websites To Measure Ad Views Online

If you don’t like the concept of having your online actions tracked for marketing purposes, you can add Nielsen to you list of sworn enemies. The audience measurement company is better known for its TV viewer ratings, but yesterday it announced a new partnership with websites like Facebook where it will access user info (age and gender only, it says) to collect aggregate data on ad views around the web. [More]

CAPTCHA Codes, Now With Ad Slogans

CAPTCHA Codes, Now With Ad Slogans

A company called Solve Media is rolling out a new CAPTCHA interface that requires you type in an ad slogan instead of a nonsense word, reports AdAge. Advertisers are looking for message comprehension,” says the company’s owner, “And you know what they say, ‘If you write something down, you remember it.'” And if you force a customer to repeat your slogan during an unrelated transaction, does he resent you for it? [More]

Diesel Website Wants Color Scan Of Your Credit Card Via Email

Diesel Website Wants Color Scan Of Your Credit Card Via Email

I know credit card fraud is rampant, but I’m not sure sending full scans of your card through email is the proper way to fix things. [More]

You Can Get Any 42" Samsung Plasma TV From Target, As Long As It's Smashed

You Can Get Any 42" Samsung Plasma TV From Target, As Long As It's Smashed

Steve’s TV buying experience with Target has not gone well. If he wants to try this a third time, the store is more than willing to let him, but they say he has to pay full price now and there’s still no guarantee a broken TV won’t show up on his doorstep. [More]

Google Settles Buzz Lawsuit For $8.5 Million; You Don't Get Any Of It

Google Settles Buzz Lawsuit For $8.5 Million; You Don't Get Any Of It

Hey, remember when Google signed everyone up for Buzz without asking and revealed their private contact lists? The company has now settled a class action lawsuit brought by seven Gmail users. The BBC says that 30% will go to the legal team, while each of those seven users will get $2,500. The rest will not be turned into Google stickers or free AdSense ads for you, but instead will be “shared among organisations that promote online privacy.” [More]

Consumer Group Launches Anti-Google Ad In Times Square, Keeps Google Analytics On Its Own Website

Consumer Group Launches Anti-Google Ad In Times Square, Keeps Google Analytics On Its Own Website

The group Consumer Watchdog is pushing hard for Congress to establish a “do not track” list for online consumers, which I’m all for. I’m not sure whether releasing a ridiculously unpleasant cartoon in Times Square is the right strategy, though–especially when you use the very service you’re warning people about. [More]