(Great Beyond)

Fannie & Freddie To Let Some Underwater Homeowners Walk Away From Their Mortgages

Since bailed-out mortgage servicers began dealing with the toxic loans made during the housing bubble, the focus has been on people who couldn’t pay their mortgages. Now Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have an out for people who have continued to pay while their houses have lost value. [More]

Majority Of U.S. Homeowners Paying At Least 5% Interest On Mortgages

Majority Of U.S. Homeowners Paying At Least 5% Interest On Mortgages

While interest rates for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages have been hovering around the 4% mark for around a year — and 15-year fixed loans have dipped below 3% in recent months — nearly 7 out of 10 American homeowners are still paying at least 5% interest on their home loans. [More]

More Homeowners Sunk Underwater In Third Quarter

More Homeowners Sunk Underwater In Third Quarter

Overwhelmed homeowners looking for a life raft splashed around to no avail in the third quarter, but they did receive more company. According to Zillow, the amount of underwater homeowners — those who owed more than their home was worth — rose to 28.6 percent from 26.8 percent in the second quarter. [More]

28.4% Of All Homes Are Underwater

28.4% Of All Homes Are Underwater

A new report by Zillow says that 28.4% of all single-family houses in America with mortgages are underwater. No, we’re not talking about flooding in the south, but homes that owe more on their mortgage than they are worth. It’s even worse in places where the bubble was the biggest. In Tampa, FL, 59.8% of homes have negative equity and in Phoenix, AZ, it’s 68.4%. Declines in home values are still happening and Zillow doesn’t see a bottom happening until 2012, at the earliest. [More]

Wells Fargo To Make $772 Million In Mortgage Adjustments Following Investigation

Wells Fargo To Make $772 Million In Mortgage Adjustments Following Investigation

Wells Fargo has reached a nearly $800 million settlement with Attorneys General in eight states where the company — more precisely, Wachovia, which was acquired by Wells Fargo after it failed — was under investigation for allegedly deceiving some borrowers into taking out loans they could never pay back. [More]