Facebook Will Let Users Help Draft New Terms Of Service

Facebook Will Let Users Help Draft New Terms Of Service

We are open to putting the documents up to a vote. The rules people must do when on the site and what we must do, a two way thing. There will be Comment periods, a council that will help on future revisions.

What Facebook's Users Want In The Next Terms Of Service

What Facebook's Users Want In The Next Terms Of Service

Now that Facebook has said they’re drafting a new Terms of Service based on community input, that community has eagerly put forth their proposals in the Facebook Bill of Rights and Responsibilities Facebook group. Forum admin Julius Harper went through the 27 pages of feedback and pulled out the three major areas the community seemed most concerned about. Here’s what the people are demanding:

Facebook Reverts Back To Old Terms Of Service

Facebook Reverts Back To Old Terms Of Service

It appears in the wake of global attention and outcry, Facebook has, as of at least 12:27 am, reverted back to the previous Terms of Service. Phew, now we can all go back to sending each other digital cupcakes without Big Brother watching us. This is a temporary move until Facebook can draft a new Terms of Service that addresses the users’ concerns. CEO Zuckerberg wrote a new blog post, and Facebook spokesperson Barry Schnitt released this statement:

Facebook Privacy Fallout Goes Nuclear

Facebook Privacy Fallout Goes Nuclear

Online, in print and on TV, Consumerist’s Facebook terms of service change story, and the ensuing global uproar, has spread like Ebola in a monkey house…

Facebook's New Terms Of Service: "We Can Do Anything We Want With Your Content. Forever."

Facebook's New Terms Of Service: "We Can Do Anything We Want With Your Content. Forever."

This post has generated a lot of responses, including from Facebook. Check them out here.

Comcast's Class Action Waiver Ruled "Unconscionable"

Comcast's Class Action Waiver Ruled "Unconscionable"

Comcast can’t use their mandatory arbitration clause to keep its Georgia customers from obtaining class-action status in a lawsuit that alleges Comcast inappropriately collected too many franchise fees. The amount that was improperly collected (about $11 a subscriber) isn’t enough to warrant a bunch of individual lawsuits, so Comcast thought it could get away with it by citing its mandatory arbitration clause forbidding class-action lawsuits. It worked at first, but now the 11th Circuit Court is having none of it.