Um, Arno... who are those two guys who just walked in during the middle of this scene at started babbling in French?

If Video Game Publishers Want To Release Broken Games, They Should Discount Pre-Orders

You wouldn’t go to Spring Training and expect to pay regular season prices to see a sluggish baseball team play a half-assed game. If you go to a preview of a new musical — where they might not be in full costume or have to stop and start a song halfway through — you don’t pay the same as someone going to the theater after opening night. And there’s a reason why the “dinged and discounted” section of the furniture store isn’t asking for the full sticker price. But when it comes to video games, consumers are increasingly paying a premium to be de facto beta testers for unfinished and broken games that aren’t ready for the market. [More]

While Ubisoft has spent millions marketing Assassin's Creed: Unity, it forced reviewers to hold their write-ups until hours after the game was released today.

3 Reasons Why Video Game Review Embargoes Are Particularly Anti-Consumer

One of the perks of my former life in the entertainment news business was getting early access to everything from books to movies to music to video games. On the down side, that early access often comes with the stipulation that you can’t say anything about what you’ve seen, read, played, or heard until the publisher says so. It’s an annoyance for all reviewers, especially when they want to tell the public that something is so bad they should stay away, but it’s particularly harmful in the video game business. [More]

Snooping Sites, Aimless Ads, Sexist Stereotypes: A Look Back At The Week In Tech News

Snooping Sites, Aimless Ads, Sexist Stereotypes: A Look Back At The Week In Tech News

It’s a big, busy world, and even with a smartphone in your pocket at all times it’s hard to read everything written about it in a week. Sometimes, useful info slips through the cracks. So, here are five interesting stories from the world of internet and technology news. [More]

Alan Rappa

It’s Time To Start Treating Video Game Industry Like The $21 Billion Business It Is

The majority of video games in the U.S. are purchased and played by adults. The largest titles make money that Hollywood films could only dream of raking in, and the biggest players in the industry run multibillion-dollar multinational operations that employ thousands of people. Yet many consumers still think of gaming as a kid’s thing that doesn’t merit serious consideration or scrutiny. In an age where our culture recognizes previously sniffed-about industries like professional sports as much more than child’s play, it’s time to get over that same hump about video games. [More]

The young men in Comcast's ad are all very impressed that their offline game does not have buffering issues.

Comcast Commercial Claims Their Fast In-Home WiFi Can Make Your Offline Game Work Better

Comcast’s been irking a large segment of the internet again this week. This time, though, it doesn’t have anything to do with their pro-merger mania, their stance on net neutrality, or the problems with their actual service. The latest kerfuffle is all about a thirty-second commercial — one that doesn’t even seem to get the basics of its own technology right. [More]

“Watch Dogs” Video Game PR Stunt Leads To Newsroom Evacuation

“Watch Dogs” Video Game PR Stunt Leads To Newsroom Evacuation

Back in the day when I worked at places where writers were allowed to receive free promotional crap (mostly DVDs and vodka… so much bad vodka) from PR companies, I got all manner of bizarre stuff, the strangest probably being a box that allegedly contained a few of Troy Polamalu’s signature curly locks. But if I received a tiny unmarked safe with a note to “check your voicemail,” and which beeped when I tried to open it, I might have gotten freaked out enough to call the police. [More]

Change your passwords, people.

Ubisoft Warns Account Holders Of Security Breach Affecting Personal Information

If you’ve got an account with Ubisoft, you should probably change your password lickety-split to something super secure. The video game company announced today that an intruder gained illegal access to some of its online systems. While Ubisoft says it’s closed off the breach, data like email addresses, encrypted passwords and user names was accessed. [More]

Target.com doesn't actually want to sell you this game.

Target, Where Assassin’s Creed III Is Discounted Online But Not Available To Buy Online

Consumerist reader Ethan wants to buy the new video game Assassin’s Creed III but, like any good shopper, doesn’t want to pay full price if he doesn’t have to. So he was thrilled to see that Target.com is selling AC3 for 17% off the sticker price — oh wait, no it isn’t. [More]

Popular Ubisoft Video Games Could Put Your Computer At Risk

Popular Ubisoft Video Games Could Put Your Computer At Risk

UPDATE: Ubisoft has released a statement saying it has pushed out a patch that should fix the issue. [More]

Pointing A Gun At People In Public Is Not Good Viral Marketing

Pointing A Gun At People In Public Is Not Good Viral Marketing

In one of the more inane attempts at viral marketing, a man in New Zealand was almost shot by police as he roamed the streets of Auckland scaring the bejeezus out of bystanders with his toy gun. [More]

Ubisoft Apologizes For Hosing PC Gamers By Offering Free Downloads

Ubisoft Apologizes For Hosing PC Gamers By Offering Free Downloads

Ubisoft had the fantastic idea of forcing gamers of Assassin’s Creed 2 to stay online while they played, to ensure via DRM that players weren’t pirating their wares. Then hackers brought down the servers, rendering the game unplayable. [More]

Stay Online While You Play Assassin's Creed 2 On PC, Or Ubisoft Will End You

Stay Online While You Play Assassin's Creed 2 On PC, Or Ubisoft Will End You

Ubisoft is so bent on stopping piracy that it has turned itself into a virtual nanny, peeking over your shoulder at all times to verify that your PC copy of Assassin’s Creed 2 isn’t a torrented file. Shacknews reports that if gamers go offline while playing the game, they’ll have to stop immediately and no recent progress will be saved. [More]

Ubisoft Dumps Starforce Like Hermaphrodite Girlfriend

Looks like that five million dollar class-action lawsuit against Ubisoft for using Starforce DRM in its products has paid off: Ubisoft have announced that in response to the lawsuit, they are dropping Starforce from all future products.

Fans Ask Ubisoft Not To Release Terrible Game

Fans Ask Ubisoft Not To Release Terrible Game