This Dollar Store Taunts You With The Past

This Dollar Store Taunts You With The Past

Can there be any sadder indication of our toilet-water economy than a dollar store that references its own happier, cheaper past? This New York City dollar store has pulled down its old sign, “Everything 99¢ Or Less,” and rebranded.

http://consumerist.com/2008/01/17/the-astrologer-magazine-shuttered/

“The Astrologer” magazine shuttered in December 2007 due to “unforeseen circumstances.” Hmm. [Neatorama]

AT&T May Limit Unlimited Data Plans To 5GB Per Month, Remove Text Messaging

AT&T May Limit Unlimited Data Plans To 5GB Per Month, Remove Text Messaging

IntoMobile writes that an “agent/employee discussion forum at HowardForums has revealed the possibility of new data plans for AT&T.”

Director Of "National Treasure" Weighs In On Misleading Trailers

Director Of "National Treasure" Weighs In On Misleading Trailers

After David Pogue’s public complaint last week that some movie trailers go too far in misleading consumers about the movie, he was contacted by the director of both “National Treasure” flicks, Jon Turteltaub, who offered his opinion on the practice: “What’s funny is that the filmmakers do exactly what you do. I was watching the final trailer for my movie, saying what you said: ‘Ummm….that’s not in the movie, that’s not in the movie, THAT’S not in the movie.’”

Can A Movie Trailer Be Accused Of False Advertising?

Can A Movie Trailer Be Accused Of False Advertising?

David Pogue has an interesting rant in today’s Circuits column about the movie “National Treasure: Book of Secrets”—or more specifically about its trailer, which is chock-full of scenes, dialogue, locations, and plot references that are nowhere to be found in the actual movie. He asks, “Just how different can a trailer be without becoming false advertising?” We immediately thought about last year’s kids flick “Bridge to Terabithia,” which was advertised like a whimsical Narnia spin-off but in reality was about the death of a major character.

Chuck Norris: "I Can't Do All That Stuff"

Chuck Norris: "I Can't Do All That Stuff"

Chuck Norris is suing publisher Penguin and author Ian Spector over the book “The Truth About Chuck Norris: 400 facts about the World’s Greatest Human”. Among other claims, the suit states that the “book’s title would mislead readers into thinking the facts were true.” This means that apparently Chuck Norris cannot cure your cancer with his tears, he did not create a giraffe by uppercutting a horse, and he cannot speak braille. If only Kevin Trudeau could be so honest.

Amuse Yourself And Others With Merchandise Stickers

Amuse Yourself And Others With Merchandise Stickers

We don’t actually recommend you go into stores and put these stickers on merchandise you haven’t bought, or outdoors on poster ads that you didn’t place. But it’s still fun to look at them and imagine all the great places they would add value to a merch display. The “Actual Size!” stickers are more absurd, but their potential for hilarity is much higher: “80% of public advertisements would be greatly improved by an ‘actual size!’ claim, from 8.5×11 “Regina Spektor Live In Concert!” flyers to ten-foot PS3 banners to airline ads in the subway with pictures of 747s.”

Aquafina Changes Label, Admits It's Tap Water

Aquafina Changes Label, Admits It's Tap Water

Aquafina, PepsiCo’s best-selling bottled water, is changing its label to clarify its true source: city water supplies. The labels have never claimed to be spring water, but the price, packaging, and placement in stores apparently made enough of the world believe it was.

Truth in Advertising

of business mannerisms intact, but with refreshingly blunt dialogue coming from all the characters mouths. “You must keep the Teddy Bear logo.”