Judge Says USA FREEDOM Act May Scuttle Twitter’s Transparency Lawsuit

Judge Says USA FREEDOM Act May Scuttle Twitter’s Transparency Lawsuit

Last October, Twitter sued the Justice Department, the U.S. Attorney General, the FBI, and FBI Director James Comey, because the social media platform believed it has a First Amendment right to be fully transparent with its users about the number and nature of national security requests it receives from the government. But with the recent passing of the USA FREEDOM Act, the judge in the case says there may be no need for the lawsuit to move forward. [More]

Feds Try To Have Most Of Twitter’s Transparency Lawsuit Dismissed

Feds Try To Have Most Of Twitter’s Transparency Lawsuit Dismissed

Last October, in response to efforts by the federal government to limit what websites can reveal about national security requests regarding its users, Twitter sued the Justice Dept., U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, the FBI and its Director James Comey. The DOJ fired back with a recent filing asking the court to dismiss most of the complaint, saying that federal guidelines do not restrict Twitter’s First Amendment rights. [More]

Facebook: Govt. Requests For User Data Up 24% In First Half Of 2014

Facebook: Govt. Requests For User Data Up 24% In First Half Of 2014

The whole notion of companies being transparent — or at least as transparent as they are allowed to be — about governmental requests for personal data is still quite new, so it’s too soon to identify trends based on the little bit of information we’re given, but today Facebook said that governmental requests for user data during the first half of 2014 were 24% higher worldwide than they were during the six months previous. [More]

(Allan)

FCC Reminds Internet Providers & Wireless Companies To Follow Transparency Rules… Or Else

Earlier this year, a federal appeals court gutted the part of the 2010 Open Internet Rules dealing with so-called net neutrality. What this decision didn’t affect are the rules requiring that providers of broadband Internet access services disclose accurate information about their service offerings to the public. And so today, the FCC is sending out a reminder to ISPs (both fixed and mobile) that they need to follow the transparency guidelines or face the possibility of penalties. [More]

AT&T Received Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act Orders For 35,000 Accounts In 6 Months

AT&T Received Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act Orders For 35,000 Accounts In 6 Months

Weeks after the U.S. Attorney General issued guidance allowing tech and telecom companies to provide slightly more information about federal law enforcement requests, AT&T has issued its first accounting of these queries. And according to the data, the Death Star received national security letters dealing with up to 5,000 accounts in all of 2013, while court orders issued under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act during the first half of 2013 were tied to more than 35,000 accounts. [More]

Feds To Allow Tech Companies To Provide More Transparent Info On Data Requests

Feds To Allow Tech Companies To Provide More Transparent Info On Data Requests

While a number of the largest websites and telecom companies have recently published transparency data detailing the number of data requests made about consumers, these companies have been very limited with regard to what they could say about federal requests that fall under the header of national security. In response to a call for more transparency from several major Internet businesses, the government is changing its restrictions. [More]

Verizon Received More Than 320,000 Law Enforcement Requests In 2013

Verizon Received More Than 320,000 Law Enforcement Requests In 2013

Verizon has finally gotten around to publishing a transparency report detailing the various requests for customer information made by local, state, and federal authorities during the last year. Over the course of the year, the company says it received more then 320,000 such requests including more than 1,000 queries related to national security issues. [More]

Apple Slams Government ‘Gag Order’ On Customer Data Requests

Apple's report contains detailed numbers for law enforcement requests from dozens of countries, but companies are forbidden from providing precise numbers that include national security requests.

Last night, Apple provided some very vague details about the number of requests for customer information it received from U.S. law enforcement and national security officials. At the same time, the company made it very clear that it would provide more precise information about the number of these requests, if only the government would let it. [More]

(catastrophegirl)

Chick Fil-A To Offer Kitchen Tours To Customers Who Ask

UPDATE: Chick fil-A has confirmed the tours to Consumerist and provided a few additional details. [More]

Microsoft Provides Details On Law Enforcement Requests For User Data

Microsoft Provides Details On Law Enforcement Requests For User Data

Microsoft reveals in a new transparency report that between all of its online services — including Hotmail, Outlook.com, SkyDrive, Xbox LIVE, Microsoft Account, Messenger, Office 365, and Skype — it received more than 75,000 requests from law enforcement agencies around the world in 2012. [More]

93,000 PSN Accounts Suspended After Latest Attack

93,000 PSN Accounts Suspended After Latest Attack

PlayStation announced they’ve suspended 93,000 PSN accounts after the latest attack against their network. [More]

Who Made The Lead In My Kid's Bed?

Who Made The Lead In My Kid's Bed?

What happens when you want to trace down which manufacturer is responsible for the lead on your kid’s Thomas the Tank Engine, and make sure you dispose of and don’t buy any other products associated with that maker? Or the melamine in your dog’s food? Or the antifreeze in your toothpaste? It can be hard to find out. Global supply chains are vast and sometimes impenetrable. For instance, your IKEA Sultan Alsarp bed is made in China (not Sweden) and contains parts from Africa, Germany, and Russia. Enter Sourcemap, a open-source MIT project that aims to find out “Where does all the stuff inside your stuff come from?” [More]

Consumers Have More Trust In Companies That Tweet

Consumers Have More Trust In Companies That Tweet

A new survey shows that 75% of consumers think companies that tweet or post Facebook updates are more deserving of their trust than companies that don’t. The CEO of Fleishman-Hillard, which conducted the survey with Harris Interactive, says he thinks it shows that companies need to respond to crises much more openly and quickly than in years past: “Not in a 24-hours news cycle, but in minute-to-minute monitoring.” [More]

SEC Wants Disclosures For Asset Backed Securities Written In Python

SEC Wants Disclosures For Asset Backed Securities Written In Python

“Waterfall” provisions of asset backed securities are the rules that explain the flow of funds in the transaction, and they are are very hard to read. Blogger/professor Jayanth Varma calls them “horrendously complicated,” leading trustees to make mistakes or pull stunts that investors never expected. To remedy this, the SEC is proposing that the provisions be written in a programming language, filed on EDGAR, and made available as downloadable Python source code. [More]

UPS Successfully Delivers Your Package To "BSMT GARBAGECAN"

UPS Successfully Delivers Your Package To "BSMT GARBAGECAN"

Reader Martin would like us to know that UPS successfully delivered his package to “BSMT GARBAGECAN.” Hey, at least they are honest. [More]

Blame Manufacturers For Annoying Hidden Prices Online

Blame Manufacturers For Annoying Hidden Prices Online

Have you been noticing more and more lately that no matter which online retailer you visit, you have to add the item to your shopping cart to see the price? Blame it on manufacturers, who are taking advantage of a 2007 Supreme Court ruling to be more aggressive about controlling pricing online, writes the New York Times. [More]

Netflix CEO Explains Why They Made The 28-Day Delay Deal

Netflix CEO Explains Why They Made The 28-Day Delay Deal

Earlier this month, Netflix made a deal with Warner Bros. to delay new DVD releases for 28 days. Over at Hacking Netflix, the CEO of the company goes into some detail on why he approached Warner Bros. to begin with (it was his idea, not theirs), and why he thinks it will work out better for everyone except those customers who signed up expecting all new releases all the time. [More]

Harrah's Las Vegas Resorts Say No To Resort Fees

Harrah's Las Vegas Resorts Say No To Resort Fees

If you don’t like the idea of paying a resort fee the next time you visit Las Vegas, make sure you check out the various Harrah’s Entertainment resorts. Today they sent a press release to travel blogger and temporary TSA aggravator Chris Elliott in which they state that all of their Vegas resorts “exclude mandatory resort fees.” [More]