Tide: Good For Removing Feces Stains

Tide: Good For Removing Feces Stains

One of the many uses for Tide is feces stains, so the company decided to open up the discussion by starting a whole thread devoted to their removal. Sprinkled in and amongst the legitimate feces stain removal company area a few suspect comments, like “im david michler. i had feces all over myslef the other day and this tide works great! i dont know how i got it on me but when i woke up 3 guys ran out my room. and it was all over my shirt and pants. i used tide about 3 days after the incident and it got it out with very little stains left over. thank you tide. i love you.” Then there’s “Josie” who says that until Tide came along, she used to take his soiled underwear back to Walmart for a refund, and “tammy ampersand” who warns against using Mountain Fresh for douching, “as it attracts birds.” No doubt sociologists will some day come up with a technical term for this juvenile online behavior, which has been seen in the past in the Amazon product reviews for the “Oozinator” toy gun, and milk. My only disappointment is that the related thread, “Big Game Stains and Solutions” had nothing in there about getting elk blood out. The sure-to-be-soon deleted message board posts, inside…

These Tide Bottles Are Not At All Confusing

These Tide Bottles Are Not At All Confusing

Reader Garret wants to know how two bottles of Tide containing the exact same amount of liquid, with identical measuring caps, can contain two different numbers of “loads.”

Use Every Last Drop Of Laundry Detergent

Reader Mark came up with a way to get at that last bit of laundry detergent, the stuff that intransigently clings to container walls, refusing to drip into your measuring cup. By punching a hole in the bottom corner of the container, Mark is able to extract enough detergent to clean a small or medium load of clothes. Do you have other ways of freeing residual detergent? Tell us in the comments.

Tide Downsizes, Charges Same Price

Tide Downsizes, Charges Same Price

New boxes of Tide have 17 oz less than before, yet consumers are asked to pay the same amount. But is it really an outrage?