(NW Sunshine)

Some Of Those Threats Weren’t Empty: 25% Of Instagram Users May Have Quit Over TOS

UPDATE 4:15 p.m.: It seems those numbers from AppData indicating that Instagram is leaking users aren’t quite all they’re cracked up to be. To that end, a spokeswoman for Instagram denies the app is losing users, saying in a statement: “We continue to see strong and steady growth in both registered and active users of Instagram.” [More]

Merry Christmas, Instagram.

It Was Only A Matter Of Time: Instagram Hit With Civil Lawsuit Over Terms Of Service

While many of us were hanging our stockings with care on Monday evening, Facebook and Instagram were facing a far less cheery Christmas present in the form of a proposed class action lawsuit filed in a federal court in California. Nothing says “Happy Holidays” like a little legal action against a ginormous social network, right? [More]

(@kimkardashian)

Instagram’s Most Followed User Kim Kardashian Might Totally Break Up With It

Despite the backpedaling Instagram performed on Tuesday night in the wake of a widespread backlash against its controversial new terms of service and privacy policy, the social media service is still facing the prospect of losing a lot of users. And if it loses its most followed user, things could be even worse. Do you really want Kim Kardashian to leave and possibly take a chunk of her 5.7 million followers with her, Instagram? Well, do ya? [More]

(MBQ)

Don’t Like Instagram’s New Terms Of Service & Privacy Policy? Quitting Is The Only Way Out

It seems like every week users of social network Instagram have been seeing more and more changes, all leading the service down the merry path toward becoming more and more like its parent company, Facebook. There was the Twitter card break-up, followed by the revelation that yes, Instagram would get ads. And now the service has updated its terms of service and privacy policy in ways that might see a whole lot of users fleeing for good. [More]

Microsoft Updates Service Agreement To Make It Easier To Read The New Mandatory Binding Arbitration Clause

Microsoft Updates Service Agreement To Make It Easier To Read The New Mandatory Binding Arbitration Clause

While we appreciate that Microsoft has made its online services agreement much easier to read, the update comes with a questionable addition: a shiny new mandatory binding arbitration clause with class action waiver. The clause states that you agree to settle any legal disputes (except intellectual property rights disputes) in either the small claims court in your county of residence or Microsoft’s, or through the arbitration procedure outlined in the agreement. Microsoft announced that this change was coming awhile back, and has already added similar language to its XBOX Live service. [More]

Terms Of Service Too Long? This Site Reads Them For You

Terms Of Service Too Long? This Site Reads Them For You

You don’t always read the Terms of Service before accepting them. Not for hardware, not for software, not for websites. We’re fairly certain that no one ever does. (Someone out there, please prove us wrong.) What we really needed all along is a service that reads over all of that legal language and gives you the highlights of the ToS, then explains which features are good or are bad for you as a consumer. Now that service exists. It even has little pictures that tell you which parts of the ToS are good or bad. Meet ToS;DR. [More]

Nobody Actually Reads Terms Of Service

Nobody Actually Reads Terms Of Service

Let’s be honest. [More]

Netflix: We Can Murder Your Account With No Notice At Our Whim

Netflix: We Can Murder Your Account With No Notice At Our Whim

It’s amazing what we agree to every day when we scroll through infinite screens of dense legalese to click the box that said we’ve read and agree to abide by the terms of service on various sites. Brandon discovered that Neftlix users have all consented for the company to stop its endless supply of movie and TV shows for any reason whatsoever. [More]

Groupon Shows How To Properly Explain TOS Changes

Groupon Shows How To Properly Explain TOS Changes

Groupon is a daily deal sort of website, but the reason it’s on Consumerist today is because of how well it communicated some recent changes to its Terms of Service agreement. Consumerist reader Pureboy sent in a copy of the email he recently received where the website explained the changes in plain English, with examples. [More]

Senator Asks FTC To Provide Privacy Guidelines For Facebook, Other Social Networks

Senator Asks FTC To Provide Privacy Guidelines For Facebook, Other Social Networks

Senator Charles Schumer is upset on your behalf over Facebook’s latest loosening of its privacy policies, and yesterday he called for the FTC to step in and provide some guidance, offering to introduce legislation if the agency feels it needs that extra authority. Specifically, Schumer wants three things: opt-out defaults should be switched to opt-in, sites should always disclose where the information is going, and there should be some general “guidelines for user privacy” that sites follow. [More]

Sony Says It Can Take Away Data, Content With Updates At Will

Sony Says It Can Take Away Data, Content With Updates At Will

Sloopydrew says Sony sent him a new terms of service email with some harrowing declarations about the company’s rights to screw with your gadgets as it sees fit — sort of a retroactive justification for taking away the ability to install another operating system on the PS3 hard drive. [More]

Citibank To Customer: Charge $750 And We Won't Gouge You So Badly

Citibank To Customer: Charge $750 And We Won't Gouge You So Badly

Mike says Citibank boosted his interest rate to 20 percent, then said they’d knock off half of it as long as he paid on time and charged at least $750 a month.

AmEx Sends Legal Notice Warning Of Random Denials

AmEx Sends Legal Notice Warning Of Random Denials

Steve says American Express sent him an off-putting letter letting him know it could refuse to authorize his charge at any time. He writes:

Congress Seeks To Move Up Credit Card Act Implementation To December 1st

Congress Seeks To Move Up Credit Card Act Implementation To December 1st

Today, Reps. Barney Frank and Carolyn Maloney are going to request that the implementation date for the rest of the Credit Card Act‘s rules be moved to December 1st of this year instead of February 2010, after seeing companies “jacking up their rates and doing other things to their customers in advance of the effective date” all summer, reports Mary Pilon at The Wall Street Journal.

10 Extinct Twitter-Types Thanks To New Terms Of Service

10 Extinct Twitter-Types Thanks To New Terms Of Service

Instead of cranking out cumbersome terms of service Magna Cartas that only lawyers will actually read, Twitter should follow the lead of Mashable and just come out and say what types of users it’s attempting to get rid of.

New Terms Of Service For Twitter

New Terms Of Service For Twitter

Twitter has just posted new terms of service clarifying a few points that have come up now that the service is popular and stuff. They’ve changed the terms to clarify a few points, such as advertising (they retain the right to advertise) ownership (you own your tweets) and rebroadcast (they can retweet you far and wide.) [Twitter Blog]

Facebook Says No To Advertiser Sponsored Accounts

Facebook Says No To Advertiser Sponsored Accounts

Thanks to an update to Facebook’s Statement of Rights and Responsibilities, there will be one less place for advertisers to encroach onto your private life: your friends’ news feeds.

Pseudonymbook? Facebook Will Let You Use An Alias June 13

Pseudonymbook? Facebook Will Let You Use An Alias June 13

Facebook has prided itself on forcing users to stick hard and true to their real names, eliminating the zany, anonymous nonsense on other social networking sites. The real-name policy isn’t changing, but Facebook is finally letting wacky nicknames into the mix, announcing that it will let you choose an alternate name for your profile page, letting friends who know you only as “Spanky” find you without having to recall your given moniker. The new name can also replace the nine-digit number assigned to you on your Facebook URL.