Here's How Much Law Enforcement Has To Pay To Snoop On Your Calls

Here's How Much Law Enforcement Has To Pay To Snoop On Your Calls

Back in December, a U.S. Appeals court gave the thumbs-up to telecommunications companies working with the National Security Agency to monitor phones and email. Phone companies are also apparently totally cool with selling access to your phone activities to other law enforcement agencies willing to fork over pre-set prices. [More]

Port Your Mobile Number To Google Voice Now Live

Port Your Mobile Number To Google Voice Now Live

The option to port your existing cellphone number over to Google Voice is now live and direct, baby. [More]

Coming Soon: Port Your Number To Google Voice For $20

Coming Soon: Port Your Number To Google Voice For $20

Looks like soon Google Voice will let you port your own phone number over to their service for $20. [More]

Do We Need The White Pages Anymore?

Do We Need The White Pages Anymore?

It could be the end of the line for your favorite doorstop: Verizon, the dominant phone company in New York, is asking to stop automatic delivery of the residential White Pages to doorsteps across the state later this year. [More]

FCC Asked To Address Misleading And Confusing Billing

FCC Asked To Address Misleading And Confusing Billing

In August, we wrote about upcoming investigations and possible actions by the FCC on several different areas of the consumer telecommunications experience. Several consumer groups filed comments on the first issue, truth in billing, this week, and we wanted to share some of their concerns and suggestions.

The Federal Government Has Had Enough With Cell Phone Exclusivity

The Federal Government Has Had Enough With Cell Phone Exclusivity

Annoyed by cell phone exclusivity deals? The federal government may agree with you. The FCC and Department of Justice are both looking into the issue, concerned about limitations on consumer choice and good old-fashioned competition.

Cox Sees Your Double Payment, Raises You A Double Bill

Cox Sees Your Double Payment, Raises You A Double Bill

Tamera accidentally paid her $134.61 Cox Cable bill twice, but instead of refunding or acknowledging the overpayment, Cox thought it would be fun to send Tamera an extra bill for $269. If she’s lucky, Cox says they’ll consider waiving their late fee.

Why Is Vonage Billing Domestic Calls At International Rates

Why Is Vonage Billing Domestic Calls At International Rates

Vonage charged J.R. $38.94 for a three-hour call transferred from Texas to Los Angeles because Vonage apparently thinks L.A. is somewhere in Algeria. After some digging, J.R. learned that if you transfer a call without adding +1 to the number, Vonage will mistake area codes for country codes and bill at the international rate, even though the calls are domestic.

Comcast Threatens To Cancel Your Service Over "Leaky Signal" That They Can't Understand Or Fix

Comcast Threatens To Cancel Your Service Over "Leaky Signal" That They Can't Understand Or Fix

Comcast keeps sending Andrew’s parents letters insisting that “there is a leak of our electronic signal into the air,” and that if it can’t be immediately fixed, their service will be disconnected. Andrew’s parents always immediately call Comcast to schedule a service visit, because nobody wants a signal leaking into the air, especially not one that “could interfere with aircraft and ship communications,” but each time they call, Comcast has no clue why they sent a letter, or how to plug the leaky plane-gobbling signal.

Everyone Wave Goodbye To Outgoing FCC Chief Kevin Martin

FCC Chairman Kevin Martin is calling it quits as of inauguration day. The Chairman, who could have served for three more years, is heading to the Aspen Institute, a preserve for endangered spectacles masquerading as a “nonprofit leadership group.” Martin’s tenure was a mixed bag for consumers…

http://consumerist.com/2008/07/10/the-senate-passed-the-fisa/

The Senate passed the FISA bill today, which effectively puts an end to any chance of legal repercussions for telcos who helped the government spy on citizens. Senator Obama voted for it, Senator McCain didn’t vote, and Senator Clinton, for what it’s worth, voted against it. Find out how your senator voted here. [TechCrunch]

Tired Of Your Entrenched Service Provider? Consider A Local Alternative

Tired Of Your Entrenched Service Provider? Consider A Local Alternative

Few consumers realize they can ditch their monopolistic service providers in favor of local, independent telecoms that often offer similar services at competitive rates. These smaller outfits depend on service, not size, as reader Sharpstick recently discovered:

In the Charleston SC area we are fortunate to have local a internet / phone / cable provider called Knology that has made customer service an art form.

http://consumerist.com/2008/02/03/wondering-how-undersea-cables-in/

Wondering how undersea cables in Asia recently interfered with AT&T’s network? Wired ran an excruciatingly detailed piece in 1996 by the hacker tourist that explains how the worldwide network of undersea cables—tubes, if you will—connects us to our friends halfway around the world. [Wired]

Biz Columnist Changes His Mind, Now Says "Carriers Need Regulation"

Biz Columnist Changes His Mind, Now Says "Carriers Need Regulation"

You know telecoms are behaving badly when a business columnist who just a year ago argued for a hands-off government approach has reversed his opinion. “I’ve changed my mind,” he writes. “The behavior of the top telecommunications companies, especially Verizon Communications and AT&T, has convinced me that more government involvement is needed to keep communications free of corporate interference.”

http://consumerist.com/2007/10/24/microsoft-has-said-it-will/

Microsoft has said it will not participate in the upcoming wireless spectrum auction, because it wouldn’t help their business model, which is to create and sell software to handset makers. [Reuters]

Apple Will Most Likely Sell Unlocked iPhones In France

Apple Will Most Likely Sell Unlocked iPhones In France

Various sources are saying Apple has agreed to sell unlocked phones in France—because, well, French law says they have to—but our own Gizmodo says it’s only rumor at this point: “Apple told us that the piece was based solely off of reading French Law, not from statements by Orange or Apple.”

Congress Asks FCC To Accurately Count U.S. Broadband Homes

Congress Asks FCC To Accurately Count U.S. Broadband Homes

Congress has added its voice to the growing number of critics who have noted that the FCC is misreporting broadband penetration in the U.S. According to eWeek, last Wednesday a House subcommittee “approved legislation to change the Federal Communications Commission’s methodology for determining deployment.” The FCC currently counts a single home in a zip code as representative of the full zip code—so one home having broadband access is considered the same as every home in that area having broadband access. By doing this, they inflate the number of homes with broadband access and present a picture of increased “natural” competition in the market, which is then used by telecoms and lobbyists to argue against policy decisions that don’t favor existing corporations.

Court Allows Lawsuit Against T-Mobile To Proceed

Court Allows Lawsuit Against T-Mobile To Proceed

On Wednesday, the California Supreme Court refused to review two earlier findings, which killed T-Mobile’s final chance at blocking a lawsuit against its early-termination fees and practice of locking phones. This is the third time T-Mobile has tried to stop the case from proceeding, and both a state trial judge and a state appeals court have already rejected T-Mobile’s claims that its customers were required by the terms of their contracts to submit to binding arbitration.