There Should Not Be Two Examples Of Target Math In The Same Aisle

There Should Not Be Two Examples Of Target Math In The Same Aisle

Pricing errors happen. That’s a fact of retail. What we’ve never been able to understand, though, is why they happen so often at Target, and why that store tends to make the same errors over and over: specifically, pricing items so you pay more when you buy in bulk, and posting “sale” signs with higher prices than the original price. [More]

Toilet Paper Clearance At Target Means You Pay 86¢ More

Toilet Paper Clearance At Target Means You Pay 86¢ More

Justin was shopping at his local Target store when he spotted a big pack of toilet paper marked “Clearance.” Hey, great! It’s always really useful when you can find a markdown, even one of 15% like an initial Target clearance markdown, on an important household staple. Then he looked closer. [More]

More Examples Of Target Math: They Never Said It Was “On Sale”

More Examples Of Target Math: They Never Said It Was “On Sale”

There are two different types of Target math, our name for the unusual ways that stores calculate bulk and sale prices. One type is when a “sale” price is higher than a product’s regular price, which is not the normal definition of the word “sale.” The other is when a bulk package of an item costs more per item than just buying it individually. Now we’ve discovered a new form: random numbers pulled in from nowhere. [More]

At Target And Walmart, Save More Money By Not Buying In Bulk

At Target And Walmart, Save More Money By Not Buying In Bulk

Target has its own special variety of math, where putting an item on sale means raising the price, and buying in bulk means that you pay more per unit. This strange method of calculating prices isn’t exclusive to Target, though: you can find it at other retailers, too. [More]

When Life Makes Too Much Sense, Just Apply Target Math

When Life Makes Too Much Sense, Just Apply Target Math

Here is how buying in bulk is supposed to work: you go to the store. You buy a multi-pack of an item, so the retailer makes more money from your shopping trip. In turn, the retailer charges you less for the multi-pack than you normally would have paid. That’s how this works…except when stores apply Target Math. [More]

Reader Notices Target Math, Gets $4.99 Off Price Of Lamp

Reader Notices Target Math, Gets $4.99 Off Price Of Lamp

Target is a discount store, but also a strange and mystical place where Doritos are refrigerated, sale items are simultaneously 50% off and free, and customers are notified when something isn’t on sale. As a Consumerist reader, Erin knew to look out for Target’s strange version of reality, and was able to get an item for the lower shelf tag price rather than the higher “sale” price. [More]

The photo shows a single food pouch priced at $1.39, and then a four-pack of the same size costs $5.99. That's a $2.60 surcharge.

Target Math Means You Pay Extra For Cardboard Box, Less Choice

Bulk buying is good. When you buy multiple food pouches that come in a single box, for example, it makes life easier for cashiers and maybe for you when you unload your groceries. That’s what Jared thought when he went to buy some baby food pouches at Target. [More]

Let’s Review Again What ‘Target Math’ Is And Why It’s Bad

Let’s Review Again What ‘Target Math’ Is And Why It’s Bad

When shopping, you compare prices for different sizes and quantities of the same item and weigh that against your needs to determine which is the best deal. Except at Target. At Target, customers have to deal with a special kind of math, where putting an item on sale means that the price goes up, and where buying things in larger quantities means that you pay a higher unit price. It’s a special place where the bargains are plentiful, but make no sense. [More]

With Target Math, The Price Increases When The Sign Gets Bigger

With Target Math, The Price Increases When The Sign Gets Bigger

Target is a popular and successful retail chain, which has somehow managed to spread nationwide and woo customers in spite of its poor grasp of math. Here’s yet another example of Target Math, a special way of calculating sale prices and promotions that isn’t unique to Target, but for some reason turns up on their shelves very, very often. [More]

(Mr.TinDC)

Target Agrees To Pay $3.9M To Settle False-Advertising Lawsuit

It seems some of that infamously fuzzy Target math finally caught up with the retailer, as the company has agreed to pay $3.9 million to settle a false-advertising lawsuit brought by prosecutors in California. [More]

Target, Where Holiday Menu Specials Actually Cost You More Money

Target, Where Holiday Menu Specials Actually Cost You More Money

The jingle bells are jingling, the Santas are ho-hoing and it’s officially okay for everyone to be in the holiday spirit. But while it’s always nice of businesses to try to offer special deals for holiday shoppers, Target might need to rethink how it approaches the idea of a “deal.” [More]

Wegmans And Walmart Deploy Target Math To Sell OJ, Mouthwash

Wegmans And Walmart Deploy Target Math To Sell OJ, Mouthwash

Buying in bulk to save money seems like a good idea, but in practice it doesn’t work so well. Want proof? Check out these examples of unit prices that go up the more you buy. We call it Target Math, since the phenomenon happens often in Target stores. Not exclusively in Target stores, though, as you will see. [More]

At Toys 'R' Us, the sales have you.

Like The Sign Says: This “Sale” At Toys ‘R’ Us Will Save You Exactly No Money

While we’ve become savvy enough shoppers to notice when a bit of Target math is about to render any advertised sale useless in the face of actual math, most of the time it’s up to shoppers to realize they’re not actually about to get a deal. But at Toys ‘R’ Us, at least the signs are up front about the fact that you’re about to save exactly nothing in a so-called sale. [More]

The Fun Thing About Target Math? You Can Find It At Home Depot & Walmart, Too

The Fun Thing About Target Math? You Can Find It At Home Depot & Walmart, Too

Don’t ever let anyone tell you what you can and can’t be, friends. The world is your oyster, the sky is the limit, the cliche is yours to abuse and the rules are made to be broken. So when you’re a retailer, don’t think the only store that can have Target math. [More]

Spend $5 Extra To Get $5 Gift Card At Target

Spend $5 Extra To Get $5 Gift Card At Target

Target is a successful retailer, which is impressive considering the company’s collective poor grasp of math. Reader Mireille was shopping for diapers there and spotted an interesting deal on diapers. If customers bought two boxes and paid $2.50 above the listed price on the shelf tag for each, they would get a $5 gift card. Wait, what? [More]

Obviously, Walmart Doesn’t Want You To Drink 12 Budweiser Margaritas

Obviously, Walmart Doesn’t Want You To Drink 12 Budweiser Margaritas

If one can of Budweiser’s malt beverage margarita-like substance costs one dollar, how much should twelve cans cost? That’s right…$12.97. Wait, what? If this math sounds a little off to you, apparently you don’t work at Matthew’s local Walmart. [More]

Adding Decimal Places Does Not Mean These Tastykakes Are On Sale

Adding Decimal Places Does Not Mean These Tastykakes Are On Sale

When you add decimal points to a price, does that make it a different number? That is to say, is $1 different than $1.00? It’s more accurate, sure, but it’s not a discount. Unless you’re shopping at Dollar General with reader John. [More]

Personal Grooming Is Easy, But Math Is Difficult

Personal Grooming Is Easy, But Math Is Difficult

Usually, buying in bulk saves you money. Buying a larger container or multi-pack boosts sales numbers and lowers prices for consumers. This makes perfect sense…until it doesn’t. Just ask these readers, who had to give a few seconds of serious thought to the pricing of their personal care items while shopping recently. [More]