(WKYC)

Tanning Salon Tells Woman She’s Too Fat To Bronze, Won’t Give Refund

No one can escape the laws of physics, but businesses should at least try to follow the rule of “don’t sell people things that you have no intention of providing.” An Ohio woman claims that a local tanning salon sold her a monthly package for $70, then told her that she wouldn’t be allowed to use most of the beds because she’s too fat. [More]

Docs: Tanning Booths Should Be Outlawed For Teens

Docs: Tanning Booths Should Be Outlawed For Teens

Last year, we asked readers if minors should be required to get parental permission to use a tanning bed and almost 75% of voters said yes. But today, the American Academy of Pediatrics has declared its belief that minors should be legally barred from entering a tanning salon. [More]

Need Sunscreen? Here Are The Ones Consumer Reports Likes

Need Sunscreen? Here Are The Ones Consumer Reports Likes

It’s Memorial Day! There is sunshine out my window, and it’s calling me to come bathe in it! But before I go get arrested for public nudity in the park, I’m going to apply some decent sunscreen that blocks both UVB rays and UVA rays. Consumer Reports tested sunscreens recently and says these are the top 4 products in terms of effectiveness. All of them are sprays, and fortunately the top scorer is also the second cheapest in the entire test group. [More]

Indoor Tanning Quadruples Risk Of Skin Cancer

Indoor Tanning Quadruples Risk Of Skin Cancer

Think that tanning bed is safer than the evil ol’ sun? Not quite. A new study from the American Association for Cancer Research has determined that frequent use of tanning beds can quadruple your risk of skin cancer. But, hey, you’ll look great, and isn’t that the first step to good health? [More]

Can You Become Addicted To Tanning?

Can You Become Addicted To Tanning?

A few weeks back, Consumerist readers voted overwhelming in favor of requiring parental consent for children using tanning beds, and a new study linking regular tanning to addictive behavior may back up your sense of caution on the matter. [More]

POLL: Should Tanning Beds Require Parental Consent?

POLL: Should Tanning Beds Require Parental Consent?

Yesterday, a Food & Drug Administration advisory panel suggested that the FDA begin making it a requirement for children and teenagers who want to get a golden glow from a tanning bed that they must first obtain parental consent on a form documenting that the parents are aware of the potential hazards of tanning. Since I get my sun the natural way — from the backlit screen of my laptop — I’d like to know from y’all whether you think this is a sensible idea that will help prevent skin disease and cancer in the long run or if it’s just more mandated mollycoddling… [More]

It's Official: Sunbeds Cause Cancer (But Moles Are Far Worse)

It's Official: Sunbeds Cause Cancer (But Moles Are Far Worse)

The BBC reports that there is now conclusive evidence that tanning beds can cause cancer—and not just Tacky Cancer, which makes you look orange, but real live go-see-a-doctor cancer. However, sun exposure and tanning bed radiation both pale in comparison to your mole count, according to an earlier report.

Darque Tan Prevents You From Dying Of Vitamin-D Deficiency

Darque Tan Prevents You From Dying Of Vitamin-D Deficiency

According to an article in The Daily Texan, law student Emily Prewett, has filed a complaint with the Texas Attorney General against the company Darque Tan because of their misleading and irresponsible ads. One of their television commercial begins with a man in white lab coat saying, “Science has discovered that UVB from tanning converts cholesterol into Vitamin D.” Then the narrator says, “Mmm yeah. Vitamin D-licious. Come get yours with a free week of level 1 tanning.” The TV ad and more details, inside…

FDA Halts Sale Of Libido-Increasing Injectable Tanning Drug

FDA Halts Sale Of Libido-Increasing Injectable Tanning Drug

The FDA has warned Melanocorp, Inc., of Tennessee to stop its online sales of Melanotan II, an injectable tanning product that the company claims is “effective in protecting against skin cancer and rosacea.” According to the FDA, such claims cause it to be “classified as a drug under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, as well as a new drug because there is no evidence that it is generally recognized as safe and effective for its labeled uses.”