Honda Expands Takata Airbag Recall… Again

Honda Expands Takata Airbag Recall… Again

While five major car manufactures have recalled millions of vehicles with Takata-produced airbags in the last year, Honda has by far been the most affected. And today, the car company continued to distance itself from other automakers by recalling more than 100,000 additional vehicles that may contain the airbags known to spew pieces of shrapnel at drivers and passengers upon deployment. [More]

NHTSA Chief Says Takata More “Forthcoming” With Investigation, Senators Send Letter Urging Cooperation

NHTSA Chief Says Takata More “Forthcoming” With Investigation, Senators Send Letter Urging Cooperation

A week after Japanese auto parts maker Takata said it would double its production of replacement airbags and three weeks after U.S. federal regulators began imposing a $14,000 per day fine against the company, the head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says the company is being more forthcoming with information related to an investigation into millions of defective airbags. [More]

(frankieleon)

Honda Starting New Campaign Urging Consumers To Repair Recalled Vehicles

After recalling 6.2 million vehicles for a Takata airbag defect that can spew pieces of shrapnel at passengers and drivers, Honda now plans to launch a multi-million dollar campaign urging consumers to take those recalled vehicles to a dealer for much-needed repairs. [More]

Takata To Double Airbag Replacement Production To 900,000 Kits By September

Takata To Double Airbag Replacement Production To 900,000 Kits By September

After facing increased scrutiny by federal regulators in recent weeks regarding an investigation into the massive airbag recall and lack of new safety devices, Japanese auto parts maker Takata announced it will double production of replacement airbags in the next six months. [More]

NHTSA Increases Intensity Of Takata Airbag Investigation, Orders Company To Preserve Safety Devices

NHTSA Increases Intensity Of Takata Airbag Investigation, Orders Company To Preserve Safety Devices

Federal regulators continue to put pressure on Takata Corporation to cooperate with a defective airbag investigation started last year. A week after the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration began fining the company $14,000 per day for failing to turn over documents and answer questions, the agency upgraded the investigation and ordered the company to preserve evidence. [More]

Takata To Be Fined $14K Per Day Until It Cooperates With Airbag Defect Investigation

Takata To Be Fined $14K Per Day Until It Cooperates With Airbag Defect Investigation

Officials with Japanese auto parts manufacturer Takata Corp. have continuously said they would assist U.S. regulators in their investigation regarding millions of potentially defective airbags that can spew pieces of shrapnel at passengers upon deployment. But the company doesn’t appear to be keeping its word and now faces a $14,000 per day fine until it hands over documents and other data pertinent to the investigation into airbags that have been linked to at least five deaths. [More]

(Eric Norris)

Advocates Push NHTSA For Answers Regarding Airbag Recall, Remedy Effectiveness

The first major automobile recall of 2015 centered on 2.1 million vehicles containing an electronic glitch that could cause the safety devices to deploy inadvertently. While that defect is obviously a safety hazard, little else about the recall seems out of the ordinary. That is until you learn that this is the fourth time these vehicles have been recalled for this particular issue. Now, a consumer group is pushing the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration for answers regarding the recall, its past remedy failures, and the agency’s ability to ensure owners of recalled vehicles are safe.  [More]

Feds Fine Honda $70 Million For Over A Decade’s Worth Of Inaccurate Death And Injury Reports

Feds Fine Honda $70 Million For Over A Decade’s Worth Of Inaccurate Death And Injury Reports

The new year is off to a rough start for automaker Honda, as federal regulators announced today that the car company will be paying a record-setting $70 million fine for failing to report over 1700 injuries and deaths over a period of 11 years. [More]

2014: By The Numbers

Xavier J. Peg

2014 was a record-setting year in an enormous variety of ways, both good and bad. As we wrap up and head into 2015, here’s a look at what happened, and what we learned, in the 2014 that was. [More]

Takata President, COO Steps Down To “Unify” Response To Massive Airbag Issues

Takata President, COO Steps Down To “Unify” Response To Massive Airbag Issues

Takata Corp., the auto parts supplier behind the airbags responsible for more than 20 million vehicle recalls, is apparently taking steps to “unify” its response to the massive safety issue by replacing its president and COO. [More]

(Kerry Lannert)

BMW Doesn’t Like Being The Last One Standing, Issues Nationwide Recall Of Cars With Defective Takata Airbags

Being the last one in line isn’t always the best feeling. That may have been the case for BMW after it was the last automaker to not issue a nationwide recall of vehicles equipped with Takata-produced airbags that may spew shrapnel at passengers upon deployment. Now, bowing to pressure from federal regulators, the manufacturer plans to recall some 140,000 cars from across the United States. [More]

(Ralph Krawczyk Jr)

Fiat Chrysler Expands Takata Airbag Recall To 3.3M Across The United States

After months of pushing back, Fiat Chrysler is finally following the lead of other major automakers. Bowing to pressure from federal regulators, the company is massively expanding their recall of vehicles with potentially defective Takata airbags that have been linked to at least five deaths so far.

[More]

Officials with Takata took out full-page ads in major U.S. newspapers to reassure customers. [Click to Enlarge]

Ford Takes Takata Airbag Recall Nationwide, Adds Additional 500,000 Vehicles

For the second time this month Ford has announced plans to expand its recall of vehicles equipped with Takata-produced airbags that may spew shrapnel at passengers upon deployment. Not only does the latest recall cover nearly 500,000 vehicles, it finally takes into consideration the National Highway Traffic Safety Administrations’ request to include vehicles currently registered nationwide.  [More]

(Ralph Krawczyk Jr)

Chrysler Expands Takata Airbag Recall By Nearly 209,000 Vehicles In Five Additional States, U.S. Territories

Hot off the heels of several automakers heeding regulators’ suggestion to initiate nationwide recalls of vehicles with Takata-produced airbags that may spew shrapnel at passengers upon deployment, Chrysler is following suit – kind of. [More]

(I Am Rob)

Honda, Mazda Move For National Recall Of Vehicles With Defective Takata Airbags

Nearly a month after the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration urged automakers and parts manufacturer Takata to expand recalls of vehicles with airbags that may spew shrapnel at passengers upon deployment, Honda and Mazda have agreed to national recalls – although many specifics regarding the new recalls remain undetermined. [More]

Ford And Chrysler Expand Recalls Of Vehicles With Takata Airbags

Ford And Chrysler Expand Recalls Of Vehicles With Takata Airbags

Yesterday, airbag-maker Takata made a terrifying admission: the company has no idea exactly why its products have been spraying metal shards into motorists’ bodies when they deploy. The good news is that two more automakers have, with the encouragement of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, expanded their recall of vehicles containing Takata parts to those registered in more states. [More]

Takata First Investigated Reports Of Exploding Air Bags In 2003

Takata First Investigated Reports Of Exploding Air Bags In 2003

Airbag-maker Takata still will not issue a nationwide recall of all of its exploding, shrapnel-hurling car airbags, but the company has admitted (ahead of a Congressional investigation) that it has known about the issue and investigated possible problems with the airbag inflator since 2003. [More]

Hiroshi Shimizu, enior Vice President, Global Quality Assurance Takata Corporation, answered questions during a Senate committee hearing regarding defective airbags.

Takata “Deeply Sorry” To Those Affected By Defective Airbags, Still Reluctant On Nationwide Recall

In September 2013, Stephanie Erdman’s life changed forever when her 2002 Honda Civic collided with another vehicle on the way to a local grocery store in Florida. While Erdman’s passenger suffered only scrapes and bruises, she’s undergone a number of surgeries – with more to come – after being struck by shrapnel from her vehicle’s ruptured Takata airbag. Erdman’s story, and the graphic photos of her accident and injuries, took center stage Thursday morning during a Senate Commerce, Science & Transportation hearing addressing the airbag defects that have now been linked to at least five deaths. [More]