T-Mobile CEO John Legere shares his feelings on a recent news story regarding statements made by the CEO of parent company Deutsche Telekom.

T-Mobile CEO Not Exactly Thrilled With “Bullsh**” Stories About Future Of Un-Carrier

Yesterday we told you that Tim Hoettges, CEO of T-Mobile US parent company Deutsche Telekom, had expressed some concern over the carrier’s long-term ability to continue its aggressive “Un-Carrier” promotions and competitive pricing without a merger partner. Judging by reactions of T-Mobile US CEO John Legere, he’s not exactly thrilled with the way this story is playing out in the media. [More]

T-Mobile’s Parent Company Still Wants To See It Married Off To Someone Else

T-Mobile’s Parent Company Still Wants To See It Married Off To Someone Else

It’s been a little more than three years since AT&T dumped T-Mobile at the altar when it became clear that the FCC and Justice Dept. wouldn’t sign off on the marriage. And while the little magenta wireless company has done okay for itself since — building out a decent LTE network, shaking up the subsidized device/contract model, and helping to preserve what little competition remains in the market — its parent company still wants to see T-Mobile USA married off to a wealthy American suitor. [More]

T-Mobile Announces New Unlimited (2G) Prepaid Plans Starting At $40

T-Mobile Announces New Unlimited (2G) Prepaid Plans Starting At $40

If you’re someone who wants a prepaid mobile plan that includes unlimited talk, text and data access for things like checking e-mail or occasionally browsing the Internet, T-Mobile’s new Simply Prepaid plans may be worth looking into. [More]

T-Mobile, AT&T Customers Can Now Request Their $170M In Refunds From Cramming Settlements

T-Mobile, AT&T Customers Can Now Request Their $170M In Refunds From Cramming Settlements

Earlier this year, AT&T and T-Mobile both reached major settlements with federal regulators over the illegal practice of cramming: third-party charges snuck onto wireless customers’ bills without their authorization. Combined, the two settlements will put about $170 million back in consumers’ pockets. But in order to get money back, consumers first have to ask for it. [More]

(Ron Dauphin)

T-Mobile Agrees To Pay $112.5M To Settle FTC Mobile-Cramming Lawsuit

Rounding out a week punctuated by new accusations of mobile carriers overcharging consumers using a practice known as “bill-cramming,” one past lawsuit is being put to rest. T-Mobile agreed today to shell-out at least $112.5 million to settle a Federal Trade Commission lawsuit that the “Un-carrier” tacked-on unwanted third-party charges to customer’s bills. [More]

(Spidra Webster)

CFPB Lawsuit: Sprint Made Millions Off Consumers Acting As A “Breeding Ground” For Bill-Cramming

Just a day after rumors surfaced that Sprint could be facing a $105 million from the Federal Communications Commission for allegedly overcharging customers using a practice known as “bill-cramming,” the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has filed a lawsuit against the carrier for the bogus charges placed on customer’s phone bills. [More]

(Misfit Photographer)

FCC Reportedly Planning To Fine Sprint $105M For Wireless Bill-Cramming

Just two months after the Federal Communications Commission imposed its largest fine on AT&T for overcharging consumers using a practice known as “bill-cramming,” the regulator is reportedly poised to saddle Sprint with the same $105 million fine for similar practices. [More]

This guy is maybe a little too excited about Data Stash.

T-Mobile “Data Stash” Will Let Some Customers Roll Over Unused 4G LTE Data

Here’s the latest piece of evidence showing that data is dirt cheap and we’re paying too much for it. T-Mobile announced today that it will start letting subscribers with plans of at least 3GB/month (1GB/month for tablet plans) begin rolling over any of their unused 4G LTE allotments into what it’s dubbed the “Data Stash.” [More]

(Simon Yeo)

Ting Expands Flexible Phone Plan Pricing Model To GSM Phones

Ting is a mobile virtual network operator (MVNO), or a cell phone company that doesn’t own its own network of towers, but instead leases voice and data capacity from other carriers. We’ve been hearing about Ting for a while, mostly from contented customers. Until now, though, customers were limited to phones that were purchased from the carrier, or off-contract devices from the Sprint network. Starting next year, that will change. [More]

While T-Mobile's unlimited family plan might save you compared to competitors' similar plans with large amounts of data, many families would probably save more on  a limited data plan (like T-Mo's resurrected 4-for-$100 offer) that costs less per month.

T-Mobile Introduces Unlimited Family Plans, But You May Be Better Off With Resurrected 4-For-$100 Plan

We are all officially overpaying for data. Sprint and AT&T have already demonstrated they are willing to dangle huge amounts of wireless data (that will likely never be used) in front of potential customers, and now T-Mobile is hoping that the lure of vast amounts of data (which, again, will probably go unused) is enough to bring in new family plan customers. At the same time, the company has brought back its previously popular 4-for-$100 plan that may be the better deal for most people. [More]

AT&T Not Worried That Competition Is Causing More Customers To Go Elsewhere

(jetsetpress)

This morning, AT&T’s Chief Financial Officer admitted that competition from smaller providers like Sprint and T-Mobile has resulted in a slight uptick in customer defections, but also said the company is not concerned because AT&T continues to pick up new users. [More]

FCC Releases Massive Study On Mobile Phone Theft, Asks Wireless Companies To Start Making Changes

FCC Releases Massive Study On Mobile Phone Theft, Asks Wireless Companies To Start Making Changes

Smartphones are amazingly convenient: tiny little hand-sized computers that make it easy to organize our lives on the go. They’re also amazingly good targets for theft: tiny, portable, expensive, and full of personal information. Mobile device theft is on the rise, just as mobile devices are, and the FCC has been trying to find ways to protect consumers when their devices get yanked from their hands. [More]

(bryan bope)

Mobile Companies Leaping To Sell You A New Phone — With A New Contract — On Black Friday

Is your phone getting old? Has it met with the unfortunate confluence of liquids, young children, and boisterous pets lately? If you’re in the market for a replacement or upgrade, it looks like Black Friday might be your day… as long as you’re willing to sign a contract. [More]

Widow Brings Husband’s Cremains To T-Mobile Store, Still Can’t Get Account Canceled

Widow Brings Husband’s Cremains To T-Mobile Store, Still Can’t Get Account Canceled

T-Mobile just doesn’t want to let its customers go. We’ve shared stories of customers whose survivors couldn’t get a line shut down after they died, and survivors asked to keep a phone line open so they could hear a loved one’s voice. This isn’t a problem unique to T-Mobile USA, apparently: a widow in Cardiff, Wales brought her late husband’s ashes to the store after they refused to close out her husband’s line. [More]

(Kominyetska)

T-Mobile CEO: Apple SIM That Should Let Users Switch Mobile Carriers Is Crippled By Mobile Carriers

Apple included a very consumer-friendly item in their new iPad Air 2: the Apple SIM. As designed, the Apple SIM lets iPad owners switch cellular carriers without going into phone stores or having to get any new parts. But in reality, mobile carriers are doing their best to prevent any actual real-world consumers from doing so. [More]

T-Mobile's John Legere is sick of everyone lusting after his wireless business.

T-Mobile CEO “Sick And Tired” Of Takeover Talk

T-Mobile has long been considered a juicy, low-hanging magenta fruit that some bigger company could pick off and devour. But after years of being wooed by suitors from the Death Star, Japan, and France, T-Mobile CEO John Legere says it’s time to stop talking about his company being acquired by someone else. [More]

T-Mobile, Where Being #1 Means Being Newest Item On A List

Boom, indeed.

Once again, T-Mobile is tooting its own horn, declaring a victory when there wasn’t even a fight to begin with. [More]

Study: Most Corporate “Best-Of” Awards Pretty Much As Meaningless As You Thought

Study: Most Corporate “Best-Of” Awards Pretty Much As Meaningless As You Thought

We’ve all been there: some company you really hate runs an ad singing praises about all the awards they’ve gotten claiming they’re “number one!” in something. You frown at the TV, thinking, “Who the heck named them best of anything?” Now, a new study has found that the instinct to call shenanigans on those corporate awards is exactly right. Far from being meaningful recognitions of performance, those “awards” show exactly one thing: how much a company is willing to spend on marketing. [More]