Supreme Court To Hear Walmart Gender Discrimination Suit

Supreme Court To Hear Walmart Gender Discrimination Suit

Given that Walmart is the country’s largest private employer it’s not terribly surprising that the U.S. Supreme Court has decided to have a look at the sex discrimination lawsuit filed against the retailer — the largest class-action suit of its kind in U.S. history. [More]

Chicago's 28-Year-Old Handgun Ban Struck Down By Supreme Court

Chicago's 28-Year-Old Handgun Ban Struck Down By Supreme Court

The Supreme Court has decided 5-4 in favor of firearm owners, ruling that Chicago’s 28-year-old gun ban is unconstitutional. [More]

Court Says Arbitrators Can Decide If Arbitration Is Fair

Court Says Arbitrators Can Decide If Arbitration Is Fair

Think the arbitration clause in a contract is unfair? Go ahead and contest it! Of course, you shouldn’t expect to win, since the Supreme Court has just ruled that it’s just fine for the arbitrator to decide whether the clause is fair. [More]

Supreme Court Stuffs NFL's Antitrust Protection With Goal Line Stand

Supreme Court Stuffs NFL's Antitrust Protection With Goal Line Stand

The NFL is an association of 32 separate businesses rather than one giant corporation with 32 branches, the Supreme Court ruled Monday, preventing the league from getting antitrust law protections it wanted. The suit originated from hatmaker American Needle, which the NFL dissed in favor of an exclusive deal with Reebok. American Needle said it was shut out thanks to a collaboration between the teams. [More]

Supreme Court Makes It Easier To Sue Debt Collectors

Supreme Court Makes It Easier To Sue Debt Collectors

Last week, the Supreme Court ruled that debt collectors can’t use a “bona fide error” defense to avoid being sued for misinterpreting the Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (FDCPA). In other words, if a debt collection agency makes a demand that’s in violation of the Act, it can’t say it didn’t know any better. Well, it can, but you can go right ahead and sue. [More]

Supreme Court Doesn't Know Difference Between Email And A Pager

Supreme Court Doesn't Know Difference Between Email And A Pager

Better hope your technorights-based lawsuit doesn’t make it all the way to the US Court of Last Resort, because these august judges might not have a freakin’ clue of what’s going on. Turns out they don’t know the difference between email and a pager, among other things. [More]

Supreme Court Guts Corporate Campaign Spending Limits

Corporations can now spend as much as they like on ads supporting or attacking political candidates, the Supreme Court ruled today. [AP] [More]

Maine's Supreme Court To Decide If Consumers Should Be Compensated For Hannaford Security Breach

Maine's Supreme Court To Decide If Consumers Should Be Compensated For Hannaford Security Breach

If a retailer doesn’t protect your credit card data and it gets stolen, should you be compensated? Not for any unauthorized charges, which are already covered under banks’ zero-liability protection, but for the time lost dealing with the problem, for the anxiety it causes, and for any future credit history/score issues it might cause?

End Pre-Emption, Support The Medical Device Safety Act

End Pre-Emption, Support The Medical Device Safety Act

Two recent Supreme Court cases on federal pre-emption have made a mess of tort law, confusing and endangering consumers by holding that a patient who is injured by a dangerous drug can sue the manufacturer, but a patient injured by a dangerous medical device cannot. How this happened, and what to do about it, inside.

Supreme Court Rules For Injured Consumer In Big Pharma Case

Supreme Court Rules For Injured Consumer In Big Pharma Case

The Supreme Court ruled 6-3 in favor of Diana Levine in Wyeth v. Levine. Levine, a musician, had her arm amputated when an anti-nausea drug was improperly administered in her artery, and sued the manufacturer for failing to warn of the risks on the drug’s label. Wyeth claimed that her case was pre-empted by federal law.

Big Pharma Goes Before Supreme Court To Get State Lawsuits Banned

Big Pharma Goes Before Supreme Court To Get State Lawsuits Banned

“Pre-emption” is a legal doctrine that says the federal government can claim all regulatory power over an area or subject, barring states from acting on their own. The drug maker Wyeth has brought a case before the Supreme Court arguing that a woman in Vermont, who lost her arm due to a drug complication that Wyeth knew about but did not publicize, cannot sue them in state court because of pre-emption. Wyeth says that only the FDA has the power to regulate it—and since the FDA approved Wyeth’s drug label, it’s the FDA’s responsibility. We think Wyeth is pretending to care about federal-versus-state power in an attempt to weasel out of any responsibility.

Court Changes Mind, Strikes Down Anti-Spam Law

Court Changes Mind, Strikes Down Anti-Spam Law

The court noted that “were the ‘Federalist Papers’ just being published today via e-mail, that transmission by Publius would violate the [current Virginia] statute.”

Spherion Corp. Steals $426,000 From Widow

Spherion Corp. Steals $426,000 From Widow

Thomas Amschwand knew he was dying and did everything in his power to make sure his wife would be able to collect his $426,000 life insurance policy. Yet when the 30-year-old succumbed to heart cancer, his employer, Spherion, a temporary staffing company, told his widow Melissa that she would receive nothing.

Energy Companies Win Permission To Steal $3 Billion From Customers

Energy Companies Win Permission To Steal $3 Billion From Customers

Westerners are stuck paying $3 billion to energy companies that colluded to gang-rape the free market. California, Washington, and Nevada were planning to return the money to customers, but the Supreme Court recently ruled that the industry manipulated the market, fair and square.

http://consumerist.com/2008/05/28/the-supreme-court-rejected/

The Supreme Court rejected T-Mobile’s appeal in 3 cases yesterday, which means an earlier federal ruling that says states “can refuse to enforce arbitration clauses if they include bans on class actions” will stand. Now T-Mobile has to go back to state courts to deal with the class action lawsuits against it. [Associated Press]

http://consumerist.com/2008/03/20/a-9-page-look-at-how/

A 9-page look at how big business has been scoring big wins in the Supreme Court over the past 30 years [NYT].

Exxon May Have Its Punitive Damages For Valdez Spill Cut In Half By Supreme Court

Exxon May Have Its Punitive Damages For Valdez Spill Cut In Half By Supreme Court

The Supreme Court is currently considering whether to halve the punitive damages levied against Exxon for its massive 1989 oil spill from the Exxon Valdez tanker, from the current $2.5 billion to something more like $1 billion. Exxon claims the higher number amounts to excessive punishment. According to the New York Times, the decision may come down to a tie with four justices on either side; Justice Alito is not participating because he owns Exxon Mobile stock. The Exxon Valdez disaster “caused a 3,000-square-mile oil slick and still affects Alaska’s fisheries after nearly 19 years.”

Supreme Court Sends "Judge Alex" Back To Arbitration

Supreme Court Sends "Judge Alex" Back To Arbitration

The 8-1 decision came in a lawsuit by Alex E. Ferrer, a former Florida Circuit Court judge who decides minor civil disputes as a form of TV entertainment.