The FTC received a court order to put an end to allegedly deceptive weight-loss products.

FTC Stops Company From Charging $210 For Pills That “Burn Fat Without Diet Or Exercise”

Consumers who buy into a product that promises to let you lose weight while continuing to sit on the couch eating bonbons will likely lose more money than they will pounds. Such was the case for the customers of a dietary supplement company being shut down at the request of the Federal Trade Commission for making unsubstantiated health claims and signing consumers up for monthly charges without their knowledge. [More]

FTC: Marketers Deceived Consumers About BrainStrong Supplement’s Memory Improvement Claims

FTC: Marketers Deceived Consumers About BrainStrong Supplement’s Memory Improvement Claims

When a supplement sounds too good to be true, it mostly likely is. And deceiving consumers about a product’s wondrous powers isn’t looked upon lightly by federal regulators. The marketers of BrainStrong Adult dietary supplement found that out the hard way. [More]

Another Study Shows That Glucosamine Supplements Aren’t Very Helpful

Another Study Shows That Glucosamine Supplements Aren’t Very Helpful

If we can prevent or decrease the pain of arthritis with a relatively inexpensive supplement, why shouldn’t we? Americans spent an estimated $813 million on glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate supplements for ourselves and for our pets in 2012, despite the lack of evidence that it is at all helpful to prevent or alleviate arthritis. Now another study shows that the supplements don’t really help, and may actually do the opposite of what they’re supposed to. [More]

(afagen)

Doctors Plead: Quit Wasting Your Money On Vitamin Supplements Already

Every year, Americans spend $28 billion on potions that we imbue with magical powers. We mean, of course, vitamin pills and supplements. We take them by the handful even though study after study has showed us that for people who have a deficiency, vitamin pills don’t do very much good, and may harm our health in the long run. Yes, harm. [More]

(HealthGauge)

Should You Take Glucosamine And Chondroitin? Meh

Americans are buying a lot of glucosamine and chondroitin supplements, which are intended to help ease the pain of or prevent symptoms from arthritis. The problem is that there’s no proof that the pills do any good…and tests from our lab-coated cousins down the hall at Consumer Reports showed that many brands don’t even contain the whole dose claimed on the label. [More]

(Carbon Arc)

No, A Dietary Supplement Probably Doesn’t Prevent Gray Hair

One of the fun things about working in the media is definitely reading the odd press releases and story pitches that cross my inbox every day. Our colleagues over at Consumer Reports received a pitch in their mailbox about a dietary supplement that’s supposed to “prevent and reverse” gray hair. Wait, that’s a thing? Not only is it a thing, but someone was pushing it as a great Mother’s Day gift. [More]

(nathanmac87)

Feds: 20% Of Weight Loss, Immune System Supplements Making False Claims

It’s not just that the federal government doesn’t want the marketers of dietary supplements to just make up what their products can do for consumers, according to a new study on the prevalence of weight loss and immune system supplement, the Department of Health and Human Services warns that it could actually be harmful to our health to buy in to the hype. The agency just released a new report saying that around 20% of 127 different supplements it investigated made false and illegal claims to cure or treat diseases. [More]

Where Has My Slow Fe Iron Supplement Gone?

Where Has My Slow Fe Iron Supplement Gone?

Cheryl takes iron supplements. She has iron deficiency anemia, and the vast majority of iron supplements on the market make her ill. She’s come to rely on Slow-Fe, made by Novartis, to keep her iron levels up and her digestive system functioning. Then Slow-Fe disappeared. Her regular pharmacist can’t find any to order, and the only sources online are re-sellers with expired products. Remembering our past coverage of catastrophic OB tampon, Eggo waffle, and Morningstar veggie dog shortages, Cheryl wrote to us, asking for help. Could we help her figure out where her precious iron had gone? [More]

Experts: You Don't Need Extra Calcium, Vitamin D

Experts: You Don't Need Extra Calcium, Vitamin D

Those daily vitamin supplements may not be doing as much good as you think, and may in fact harm you. A committee of medical experts from the Institute of Medicine released a report that says excessive amounts of calcium and vitamin D aren’t helpful. [More]

The Dirty Dozen: 12 Dangerous Supplements Easily Found In
Stores And Online

The Dirty Dozen: 12 Dangerous Supplements Easily Found In Stores And Online

We Americans do love our dietary supplements. More than half of the adult population have taken them to stay healthy, lose weight, gain an edge in sports or in the bedroom, and avoid using prescription drugs. In 2009, we spent $26.7 billion on them, according to the Nutrition Business Journal, a trade publication. What consumers might not realize, though, is that supplement manufacturers routinely, and legally, sell their products without first having to demonstrate that they are safe and effective. Inside, Consumer Reports Health lists 12 supplements linked by clinical research or case reports to serious side effects

Want More Lead Or Pesticide In Your Body? Try Dietary Supplements

Want More Lead Or Pesticide In Your Body? Try Dietary Supplements

Lead has a deservedly bad reputation when it comes to human health and development, but because it’s classified as a heavy metal it will always be kind of awesome. Well, to me. Pesticide, not so much. If you dislike ingesting either type of toxin, you might be interested in a new study being released today by the Government Accountability Office that found trace amounts of “lead and other contaminants” in every sample of 40 health supplements tested. [More]

Health Supplement Guru Nearly Dies After Ingesting Own Product

Health Supplement Guru Nearly Dies After Ingesting Own Product

Gary Null sells something called Ultimate Power Meal, which he says you’re supposed to eat twice a day every day. He did that for a month and nearly died, so now he’s suing the company that manufactured the product. [More]

Interactive Chart Helps You Vet Health Supplements

Interactive Chart Helps You Vet Health Supplements

Are you tired of forgetting whether you should add creatine or cinnamon to your kale smoothie? Do you worry that the milk thistle you’ve rubbed on your genitals isn’t helping? The “Snake Oil?” graphic at informationisbeautiful.net can help you out–it provides a graphical overview of 166 different health supplements and arranges them according to how much evidence there is that they actually work. [More]

Reminder: Ingesting Silver Does Not Cure Anthrax Or Swine Flu

Reminder: Ingesting Silver Does Not Cure Anthrax Or Swine Flu

Sure, there are plenty of websites out there touting colloidal silver as a miracle cure for every disease in existence. This would be great if it actually worked. Now that flu season looms and H1N1/swine flu panic has returned to the nation, Consumer Reports Health would like to remind you that no, you can’t cure chronic or communicable diseases with colloidal silver. Plus, it might turn your skin blue.

What's In Your Herbal Remedies and Supplements?

What's In Your Herbal Remedies and Supplements?

In the wake of FDA warnings about steroids in nutritional supplements, federal officials are studying ways to improve safety in dietary supplements. Mean time, we’ve got a few consumer tips for those of you who take supplements, courtesy of the Wall Street Journal:

Good News For Attorneys With Bulging Muscles, Pretty Dresses, And HDTVs

Good News For Attorneys With Bulging Muscles, Pretty Dresses, And HDTVs

Have you taken a bar exam prep course since 2001? Have you shopped at Cache, bought an HDTV, or used creatine supplements? You just might be eligible for one of several recently settled lawsuits.

FDA Warns Consumers About Proto-Steroids Marketed As Nutritional Supplements

FDA Warns Consumers About Proto-Steroids Marketed As Nutritional Supplements

You should avoid nutritional supplements that claim to have steroid-like effects, no matter how many flames are pictured on the label. Earlier this week, the FDA sent a warning letter to Americell-Labs, the manufacturer of many popular lines of such supplements, and also warned consumers to stay away from the products. The “supplements” claim to act a little too much like steroids, and should be tested and sold as drugs if they are, y’know, drugs. If they’re anabolic steroids, they shouldn’t be sold at all.

$500,000 In Consumer Refunds From Rite Aid After False Cold Remedy Advertising Suit

$500,000 In Consumer Refunds From Rite Aid After False Cold Remedy Advertising Suit

Remember the class-action lawsuit against the makers of cold-and-flu-preventing magic potion Airborne? Airborne claimed that it could prevent or shorten colds and flus, without any actual scientific evidence to back those claims up.