(frankieleon)

Let’s face it. Summer? It’s almost over. But if you want to wear those beach clothes next year instead of splashing out more cash on shorts, tanks and sundresses, it’s best to remove signs of this season’s beach fun from your clothing now instead of bemoaning the sunscreen stains next year. The fix? A little bit of glycerin and liquid dish soap. Who knew? [via RealSimple.com]

(frankieleon)

Sunscreen Might Not Be The Fountain Of Youth But Study Says It Does Slows Aging

For those of you out there on the neverending search for the next miracle product that will keep your skin smooth and taut through the years, we’ve got bad news: There is no fountain of youth. If there was, GPS probably would’ve found it by now. But research out of hot hot Australia says that using sunscreen regularly could slow the aging of your skin. [More]

(frankieleon.)

If European Sunscreens Are So Great, Why Can’t We Buy Them In The U.S.?

As someone with skin that basically ignites upon contact with the sun’s rays, I’m always looking for a better sunscreen to aid me in my battle against the inevitable sunburn. Recently I heard about a product that was anecdotally called “miraculous,” but couldn’t find it in U.S. stores. I bought it from a British retailer online, and subsequently want to marry it. So if there are such great sunscreens in Europe and elsewhere, how come we can’t get them in the U.S.? [More]

(frankieleon.)

Store-Brand Sunscreens From Target, Walmart, Walgreens Outperform Higher-Priced Options In Test

If you think you get what you pay for when you buy sunscreen, you might be in for a surprise. Our less-sunburned cousins at Consumer Reports recently put a dozen sun-protection products to the test and the ones that came out on top were also among the least expensive. [More]

(bluwmongoose)

FDA’s New Sunscreen Labeling Rules Go Into Effect, But Without A Cap On SPF Ratings

We’ve heard the Food and Drug Administration say it once, and we’ll reiterate it again: buying a sunscreen with an SPF of over 50 doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll get extra protection from the sun’s rays. The FDA’s new rules regarding sunscreen labels have been in the works for a while and are going into effect this summer, but despite concerns, many products will still showcase an SPF rating over over 50. [More]

WBZ-TV

Here’s What Happens When Banana Boat Ignites On Your Skin

On Friday, the makers of Banana Boat sunscreen recalled a slew of products over concerns that they could possibly ignite on a users’ skin. And while the idea of flaming sunscreen scored its share of giggles, the image here shows it’s no laughing matter. [More]

See below for complete list of recalled items

Banana Boat Sunscreen Recalled Because Your Skin Isn’t Supposed To Be Set On Fire

Considering that Banana Boat sunscreen products are supposed to keep you from getting sunburn, it’s a bit surprising that the stuff is being recalled because it could ignite while still on your skin. [More]

Why Is Sunscreen Forbidden For Kids At Some Schools And Camps?

Why Is Sunscreen Forbidden For Kids At Some Schools And Camps?

Sunscreen is a friend to fair and dark complexions alike, protecting its wearers from sunburn and other forms of skin damage. So why would schools and camps ban kids from carrying the stuff without a doctor’s note? After a recent story of a mom horrified that her two daughters were severely sunburned after a school field day, claiming no adults gave them sunscreen or provided shade, these policies are getting closer scrutiny. [More]

FDA Announces New Labeling Standards For Sunscreen

FDA Announces New Labeling Standards For Sunscreen

Earlier today, the Food and Drug Administration announced new labeling guidlines for sunscreen in an effort to make it clear to consumers which products offer the best chance of keeping your skin from turning into shoe leather. [More]

You Still Can't Trust Trust Sunscreen SPF, Waterproof Claims

You Still Can't Trust Trust Sunscreen SPF, Waterproof Claims

Sunscreen makers can say almost anything they want about their product’s sun protection factor or water fighting ability because the FDA’s sunscreen regulations are a just a teensy bit late. Well, they’re actually thirty-two years late, but the FDA swears that they’re going to publish final regulations by October. Except maybe not. So what can consumers do in the meantime? [More]

Study Finds Sunscreen May Help Cancer Develop Rather Than Prevent It

Study Finds Sunscreen May Help Cancer Develop Rather Than Prevent It

The advice for the Class of 99 was to wear sunscreen, but the Environmental Working Group doesn’t think that’s such great advice, concluding that sunscreen does little to prevent skin cancer and in fact may speed up the rate at which cancer develops and spreads. [More]

Will Ferrell Introduces Sunscreen For Men

Will Ferrell Introduces Sunscreen For Men

Okay, maybe it’s not just for men, but you can’t help but feel studly when you look at the labels for these bottles of 30 SPF sunscreen. And yes, it’s real; apparently Ferrell is pulling a Paul Newman and selling Completely Random Products for charity. In this case, the proceeds go to a scholarship fund for cancer survivors.

Buy The Right Sunscreen And Avoid Sunburn

Buy The Right Sunscreen And Avoid Sunburn

Buying the right sunscreen could mean the difference between a pleasant day at the beach and a nightmare of splotchy pain. Consumer Reports conducted a poll to see how you people use sunscreen, and even dunked a bunch of volunteers in a tub for forty minutes to see how different sunscreens held up. Inside, the sunscreens that earned Consumer Reports’ praise, and a few tips for avoiding the dreaded summer sunburn.

http://consumerist.com/2009/05/26/sunscreen-might-get-in-your/

Sunscreen might get in your eyes. Deal with it. With those evil summer rays starting to beat down, Consumer Reports Health ran a survey to see who was using sunscreen. The good news: About 69% of respondents slather it on at least sometimes. The bad: Even the most avid sun worshippers tend to skip sunscreen when they’re doing outdoor activities other than sunbathing, like running. Top reasons for avoiding sunscreen include the possibility of it getting in your eyes, and having sand stick to your skin. Yeah, we’d risk skin cancer for that, too. [Consumer Reports Health]

If This SPF Goes Any Higher, My Sunscreen Will Turn Into Aluminum Foil

If This SPF Goes Any Higher, My Sunscreen Will Turn Into Aluminum Foil

The difference in UVB protection between an SPF 100 and SPF 50 is marginal. Far from offering double the blockage, SPF 100 blocks 99 percent of UVB rays, while SPF 50 blocks 98 percent. (SPF 30, that old-timer, holds its own, deflecting 96.7 percent).

Consumer Reports: Why Are Companies Lying About Putting Nanoparticles In Your Sunscreen?

Consumer Reports: Why Are Companies Lying About Putting Nanoparticles In Your Sunscreen?

Little is known about how nanoparticles — ultra-small particles that are so teeny that they can have different physical properties than “macro” sized particles. For example, says Consumer Reports, carbon becomes 100 times stronger than steel, aluminum turns highly explosive, and gold melts at room temperature. What do titanium dioxide or zinc oxide do? Well, whatever it is — it may be in your sunscreen without your knowledge.

FDA Overhauls Sunscreen Ratings As Part Of Continuing War Against The Sun

FDA Overhauls Sunscreen Ratings As Part Of Continuing War Against The Sun

A recently issued rule from the FDA would overhaul and expand the agency’s fight against the sun’s radiation. The proposed regulation would require sunscreen makers to test for effectiveness against UVA rays, which unlike UVB rays, do not burn the skin; UVA instead gives us an attractive bronze that can cause cancer.