Microsoft Promises That New Kinect Is Not (Always) A Crazy Spying Machine

Microsoft Promises That New Kinect Is Not (Always) A Crazy Spying Machine

With the new Xbox One console only weeks away from launch, Microsoft is doing its best to quell concerns that the new Kinect motion and voice sensor will be spying on users and storing important, sensitive information. [More]

Aaron’s Agrees To Stop Snooping On Customers Via Rented Computers

Aaron’s Agrees To Stop Snooping On Customers Via Rented Computers

In Sept. 2012, Aaron’s was one of several rent-to-own retailers caught using software to illegally snoop on customers who rented computers. Yesterday, the Federal Trade Commission announced that Aaron’s has agreed to settle these charges and make sure franchisees cease the spying. [More]

Google Says No (For Now) To Facial Recognition Apps For Glass

Google Says No (For Now) To Facial Recognition Apps For Glass

As consumers test Google’s Glass device on the streets and subways of America, many people have raised privacy concerns about the possibility of developers creating facial recognition apps for the wearable computers. But Google is trying to calm those fears by saying it won’t allow such apps… for the time-being. [More]

Microsoft Eases Concerns (Slightly) About Being Spied On By Xbox One

Microsoft Eases Concerns (Slightly) About Being Spied On By Xbox One

Among the major concerns about the upcoming Xbox One gaming console is that the device’s new Kinect sensor is so thoroughly integrated into the the system that it will always be on and listening/watching what users are doing. In response to consumers who would rather not be monitored 24/7, Microsoft has issued a statement that quells some concerns while raising others. [More]

Web Analytics Firm, 20 Clients Sued For Web Tracking

Web Analytics Firm, 20 Clients Sued For Web Tracking

There’s big business in tracking web browsing, and temptation to grab more information than is legally acceptable. A lawsuit alleges a web analytics company and its clients stepped over the line in snooping on browsing habits, particularly of those who try to cover their tracks. [More]