Procter & Gamble Washes Hands Of Soap Operas To Focus On Social Media

Procter & Gamble Washes Hands Of Soap Operas To Focus On Social Media

After pioneering soap operas as ad vehicles for its cleaning products, Procter & Gamble — which cranks out Gain detergent, Head & Shoulders shampoo and Old Spice deodorant, among other products — has stopped producing long-running daytime serials to focus on social media. P&G-produced Guiding Light went dim last year, and As the World Turns stopped turning in September. [More]

CEO Says He Will "Make Digg As Good As It Used To Be"

CEO Says He Will "Make Digg As Good As It Used To Be"

Here’s the latest dispatch from contrite-CEO-land. The social news site “Digg” has a new CEO and he started things off with an admission that the site isn’t as good as it used to be, but promises that fixing things is his top priority. [More]

General Electric Responds To Twitter Distress Call, Fixes Shattered Stove

General Electric Responds To Twitter Distress Call, Fixes Shattered Stove

Mike writes that his parents came home one day to discover that the pretty black decorative glass on their oven door had broken into thousands of tiny black decorative glass shards. The stove was out of warranty, but they tried to contact GE anyway. After Mike learned about the situation, he posted to Twitter about it, hoping that GE might have some kind of special social media team scouring the Internet for dissatisfied customers. They did. [More]

Coffee Shop Owner Uses Twitter To Ban Breastfeeding In His
Store, Seems Surprised By Reaction

Coffee Shop Owner Uses Twitter To Ban Breastfeeding In His Store, Seems Surprised By Reaction

Yesterday, a coffee shop called The DoubleShot in Tulsa, OK sent out a tweet announcing that breastfeeding was now banned on the premises: “Notice: No breastfeeding at the DoubleShot. Thank you.” (The tweet has since been removed, but a tipster saved it for us.) This set off a torrent of angry reactions on Twitter, partly because everyone loves to fight about breastfeeding and partly because it’s World Breastfeeding Week. [More]

Consumers Hate Facebook As Much As Airlines, Cable Companies

Consumers Hate Facebook As Much As Airlines, Cable Companies

Has Facebook’s ongoing foolishness with privacy settings, fine print, and advertising taken its toll on the brand? According to The American Customer Satisfaction Index’s E-Business Report, Facebook scored 64 points out of 100, which puts it in the bottom 5% of private companies, “in the same range as airlines and cable companies.” The one bit of good news for Facebook is that MySpace scored 63 points. [More]

Chili's Gives FourSquare Reason To Exist

Chili's Gives FourSquare Reason To Exist

FourSquare, that helpful location-based social networking service for those oblivious to the fact that nobody on Twitter or Facebook cares which hardware store they’re frequenting, may have some redeeming value after all. That’s because Chili’s is now offering up free chips and salsa to those who check in at participating stores. [More]

Old Spice's Brilliant Marketing Your Product Could Market Like

Old Spice's Brilliant Marketing Your Product Could Market Like

We at Consumerist mostly focus on when companies screw up, with some exceptions. We must give credit for brilliant marketing strategies when it is due, though, and yesterday’s personalized YouTube video blitz by Old Spice’s towel-wrapped spokesman, Isaiah “The Man Your Man Could Smell Like” Mustafa, qualifies as brilliant. [More]

Foursquare Was Leaking Your Data, Too Busy With Funding To Tell You

Foursquare Was Leaking Your Data, Too Busy With Funding To Tell You

Wired says that a few days ago, a white hat hacker found a way to capture the location data of all of Foursquare (which we can only describe, for those who remain unaware of it, as a location-based, social media experiment in solipsism that distinguishes itself by offering Starbucks coupons) — even if users had opted-out through privacy settings. [More]

What Would You Do With A Forklift Full Of Wheat Thins?

What Would You Do With A Forklift Full Of Wheat Thins?

Have you seen Nabisco’s new attempt to engage with customers through those social networking thingies that all the kids are into? They’re the latest brand to reach out through social media and find customers who are already talking about their brand, then engage with them. In completely ridiculous ways. Take, for example, the woman whose mournful Facebook post about running out of Wheat Thins led to the delivery of more Wheat Thins than one person could ever eat. [More]

Young People Actually More Likely To Be Savvy About Internet Privacy

Young People Actually More Likely To Be Savvy About Internet Privacy

The prevailing wisdom about young people is that they are not savvy when it comes to managing their on-line reputations — but a new study by the Pew Internet and American Life project says that the opposite is true. Young people are actually much more likely to actively restrict what information they share and with whom they share it. [More]

Visualizing The Devolution Of Privacy On Facebook

Visualizing The Devolution Of Privacy On Facebook

This chart shows how the default privacy settings on Facebook have gotten less, well, private, from 2005-2010. Created by Matt McKeon based off an EFF timeline, it helps visualize how Facebook has grown increasingly permissive with your data as it has grown in size, power, and revenue. What might tomorrow bring? Perhaps in the future Facebook will create placeholder profiles for people who haven’t signed up yet, using data gleaned from Zabasearch and LexisNexis. Check out Matt’s site for an interactive version.

The Evolution of Privacy on Facebook [mattmckeon via NPR]

New Book With Foreword By Ben Popken

New Book With Foreword By Ben Popken

Marketing blogger Joseph Jaffe’s new book. “Flip The Funnel” preaches some of the same new religion we do at Consumerist and uses as examples some of our favorite stories, like United Breaks Guitars and boogers in the Domino’s. Joe is all about how customer service should be the first thought, not an afterthought. He warns how if companies don’t stop being like Delta and start being like Zappos, if you don’t make retention the new acquisition, social media will kill you. I like Joe’s rap and I happily agreed to pen the forword, and I thought I’d share the results with you: [More]

FCC Chair Spams Facebook Friends

FCC Chair Spams Facebook Friends

His account apparently compromised by a spammer’s program, FCC chair Julius Genachowski sent out a message this morning to all his Facebook friends that said, “Adam got me started making money with this.” Adam Smith perhaps? We’ll never know, as the website Julius linked to is now unavailable. [More]

Kill Off Your Online Identities With The Web 2.0 Suicide Machine

Kill Off Your Online Identities With The Web 2.0 Suicide Machine

Supposedly the most depressing day of the year is just a few weeks away, and that sucks. But if you off yourself, you can’t drink, so it’s a conundrum. What you can do is use the website suicidemachine.org to remove yourself from unnecessary social media sites that either you’ve stopped using or don’t really enjoy anymore. [More]

Transforming Online Kvetchers Into Brand Boosters

Transforming Online Kvetchers Into Brand Boosters

Researchers announced that consumers who kvetch using social media are more likely than others to also spread positive word of mouth online. [More]

Edmunds.com Estimates Real Cash For Clunkers Cost, Gets White House Smackdown

Edmunds.com Estimates Real Cash For Clunkers Cost, Gets White House Smackdown

Edmunds.com crunched some numbers, and came to the conclusion that the federal Cash for Clunkers program was not a terribly effective use of taxpayer money. They argue that the bulk of rebates went to consumers who were going to buy cars anyway. The White House, however, begs to differ. So how did the Obama administration respond? With a snarky blog post.

How To Use Twitter To Get A Company To Solve Your Problem

How To Use Twitter To Get A Company To Solve Your Problem

Here’s a new trick for getting satisfaction from a reluctant company, using Twitter. We can call this one “tweet to power.”

http://consumerist.com/2009/04/15/your-mom-just-joined-facebook/

Your mom just joined Facebook, and she’s going to upload and tag photos of your awkward stage. [CNN]