(Paxton Holley)

7-Up Will Stop Adding Vitamin E, Touting Antioxidant Benefits Of Sodas

Anyone banking on getting all those fresh vitamins and antioxidants from a daily dose of 7-Up will have to look elsewhere, like in actual fruits instead of the pictures of them on cans. Dr. Pepper Snapple Group has agreed to stop adding vitamin E and not make claims that the drinks have antioxidants. [More]

Should Snapple Sorbet Bars Disclose They Contain Absolutely No Fruit?

Should Snapple Sorbet Bars Disclose They Contain Absolutely No Fruit?

Fruit-flavored snacks are notorious for their lack of fruit content, but most items with “sorbet” in the name at least use some fruit juice or fruit base. And one might look at the box for Snapple Sorbet Bars and think that the phrase “naturally flavored” implies some fruit content. But a look at the ingredients panel says otherwise. [More]

Dr. Pepper Ten: Naming Soda After Number Of Calories Add Up At Larger Sizes

Dr. Pepper Ten: Naming Soda After Number Of Calories Add Up At Larger Sizes

So “Ten” is Dr. Pepper’s new diet soda and it’s just for guys. But the small print with the calories on the side of the can seems puts the lie to the old trope that men are better at math… [More]

Dr. Pepper Introduces Diet Soda "Just For Men"

Dr. Pepper Introduces Diet Soda "Just For Men"

In the jungle, a fist punches a snake. Lasers blast across the screen. A man in commando gear attempts and fails to pour a can of Dr. Pepper into a glass while hurtling through the bush in an ATV. Yes, it’s the new ad campaign rolling out for Dr. Pepper Ten diet soda being marketed at men, and women aren’t invited. [More]

Snapple Tells Me Why Snapple Apple Juice Drink Doesn't Have Apples In Ingredients List

Snapple Tells Me Why Snapple Apple Juice Drink Doesn't Have Apples In Ingredients List

A reader was curious as to why Snapple’s Apple Juice Drink, despite having pictures of cut apples on the front, did not have “apple” in the list of product ingredients. Instead, they have “filtered water, sugar, pear juice, concentrate, citric acid, natural flavors” and “vegetable and fruit extracts (for color).” So I emailed Snapple customer service asking them them why, and also if they mainly used pears instead of apples. Here is their reply, which contains the words “promulgated” and “proprietary.” [More]

Snapple To Switch To Real Sugar Instead Of HFCS

Snapple To Switch To Real Sugar Instead Of HFCS

The beverage makers are jumping off HFCS like rats off a sinking ship these days. Snapple has announced that it will will eliminate HFCS from its recipes. In at least once case this will actually result in fewer calories.

Snapple's Acai Drink Just Pear Juice And Corn Syrup

Snapple's Acai Drink Just Pear Juice And Corn Syrup

Of all the ridiculous Acai schemes we’ve seen involving overpriced miracle elixirs, Snapple wins hands down—their Acai Blackberry drink is high fructose corn syrup, pear juice, and “natural flavors,” which Consumerist reader LS points out could be “a spoonful of blackberry jam from Aunt Sally’s root cellar and a puff of acai-laced breath from the health food girl in accounting.” Or more likely, just some flavoring extracts from a company similar to this one.

Does Snapple Rot?

Usually Rachel swigs Nestea but if that’s out, she gets a Snapple, which frightens her. Rachel is shocked and dismayed by the lack of an expiration date on Snapple iced tea, as well as the “film” and “floaty bits” she finds on the bottom. She asks: