(Pixteca | Len & Pix【ツ】)

Great, Now Hackers Are Apparently Hiding Malware In Job Applications Submitted Online

Though we often think of all the stress in a hiring process as being on the side of the job seeker, businesses have a new potential part of the process to worry about: Researchers say hackers are infecting companies by slipping malware in along with resumes submitted through job posting website CareerBuilder.com. [More]

(Rachel)

FBI, TSA Issue Warning To Airlines Over Possible Flight Hackings

A week after a government report identified security weaknesses within the airline industry including the possibility that newer airplanes with interconnected WiFi systems could be hacked, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Transportation Security Administration issued an alert warning airlines to be vigilant about monitoring for such threats. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Walmart Executive: Chip-And-Signature Credit Cards Not Enough To Protect Consumers

The long-awaited move from traditional magnetic stripe credit cards to cards equipped with computer chips has been touted as a safer, more secure method of payment for consumers. But a top executives at the country’s largest retailers says all the hype surrounding the new cards will likely be a security letdown without the use of PIN requirements. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Target Poised To Settle Class-Action Suit Related To Massive 2013 Hack For $10M

More than a year after Target announced that it had been victim to a massive data breach during the 2013 holiday season, the company is poised to pay $10 million to settle a class-action suit stemming from the incident. [More]

Health Insurer Premera Blue Cross Latest Hack Victim, 11M Consumers Affected

Health Insurer Premera Blue Cross Latest Hack Victim, 11M Consumers Affected

Just a month after tens of millions of consumers’ personal information was breached in the hack of health insurance firm Anthem, another U.S.-based insurance provider says it was the victim of a cyber attack affecting as many as 11 million customers. [More]

What Is The FREAK Flaw And How Much Should I, Well, Freak Out About It?

What Is The FREAK Flaw And How Much Should I, Well, Freak Out About It?

There are certain websites that you expect to be secure. The NSA’s and FBI’s sites, for example, or any shopping site you enter your credit card information on. They say HTTPS, and they show a lock, so they’re fine, right? Wrong. A team of researchers this week has announced the finding of a flaw they’re calling FREAK. It interferes with that encryption and makes some sites vulnerable — and it’s everywhere. Not just on laptop and desktop computers, but also on mobile phones and tables. Here’s what you need to know. [More]

(Adam Fagen)

Report: Stolen Credit Card Information Used By Fraudsters To Make Purchases With Apple Pay

A rash in data breaches at national retailers may have led fraudsters to use Apple Pay to make big-ticket purchases with credit card information stolen during national data breaches. [More]

(Jason Mrachina)

High-End Mandarin Oriental Hotels Confirm Data Breach

Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group – operators of more than two dozen upscale hotels from Atlanta to Jakarta – confirmed late Wednesday that its properties are the latest victims of a credit card breach. [More]

Here’s How To Get Rid Of That Nasty Superfish Vulnerability On Your New Lenovo Laptop

Here’s How To Get Rid Of That Nasty Superfish Vulnerability On Your New Lenovo Laptop

Computer manufacturer Lenovo rightly caught heat far and wide from every corner of the internet this week after security researchers discovered a massive security flaw that shipped pre-installed as advertising software. Lenovo should never have put the intrusive software on their computers in the first place, but there is some good news today, as the company is now sharing a list of what computers were affected, and how owners of their machines can remove this junk crap from their systems. [More]

(Byron Chin)

Lenovo Laptops Come Pre-Installed With Giant Security Hole

It’s not uncommon for a new PC to come with some pre-installed crap on it you don’t want. From proprietary hard drive management tools to antivirus trials, software bundling is sadly common. But the junk shipping on new Lenovo laptops goes one troublesome step further: the bloatware present on several models is not only annoying, but dangerous, with a vulnerability that could let someone easily access users’ private, nominally secure data. [More]

(frankieleon)

Universal Orlando Temporarily Banning Visitors From Bringing In Bottled Water, Won’t Say Why

If you’re planning a trip to Universal Orlando in the near future, leave your bottled water and other beverages at home: In a U-turn from its usual policy allowing visitors to bring their own drinks into Universal CityWalk and other theme areas, the park is putting a temporary ban on carry-in liquids. [More]

IBM Report: Workers Using Dating Apps On Company Phones May Pose Security Risks

(laffy4k)

Whether you have a company-issued phone or you use your won for both work and play, finding love through dating apps on your device may increase the risk of a security breach for your employer, a new report from IBM says. [More]

Park-N-Fly And OneStopParking Confirm Suspected Breaches

Park-N-Fly And OneStopParking Confirm Suspected Breaches

After looking at the transactions on compromised credit cards, security experts at banks suspected that breaches may have occurred at two airport parking companies: the suspected breaches at Park-N-Fly and OneStopParking. Both companies have since confirmed that they were breached, but that doesn’t mean that the same person or group targeted both companies. [More]

(Dev.Arka)

If Your iCloud Password Is ‘Password1,’ Choose Something Else Right Now

If you use Apple’s iCloud service, you know that Apple has some limits on what your password can be, which are meant to make your account harder to break into. The password must have at least one letter, at least one number, at least one capital letter, and have at least 8 characters. However, it’s still possible to come up with a terrible password within these parameters. [More]

If You Own Any Of These Types Of Products, Change The Default Password Now

If You Own Any Of These Types Of Products, Change The Default Password Now

We told you the other day how several electronics manufacturers were shipping products with default username and password combinations that many people never think to change, leaving them open to being compromised by hackers and pranksters. To help those consumers who may not want to get into the gritty details of that story, here’s a quick guide to a number of popular types of products that people may not know they need to change the password to. [More]

(Jullo Marquez)

If You Didn’t Change The Default Password On Your Security Camera, Someone’s Probably Watching It Stream

Remote access has been a boon to many industries. Home security cameras, for example: not only can you keep an eye on your property in case anything bad happens, but you can do it in real-time, instead of reviewing footage after the fact. But cameras protecting the security of your home may in fact need a serious security helper of your own. And running tens of thousands of searchable livestreams from unwitting camera owners who didn’t change default the access passwords on their devices is certainly one (unethical, intrusive) way to make the point. [More]

(Paula S)

Soccer Team Requires Fans To Scan Hands Before Entering Games

If you think it’s a hassle getting a pat-down and walking through a metal detector at an NFL or baseball game, that’s nothing compared to what fans of one professional soccer team have to go through. In an effort to identify hooligans and cut down on hooliganism, the team now requires hand scans from all of its hometown fans before entering the stadium. [More]

FCC Filing: “At Least One” ISP Violating Net Neutrality By Blocking Encrypted Traffic

FCC Filing: “At Least One” ISP Violating Net Neutrality By Blocking Encrypted Traffic

Broadband and mobile companies are happy to claim that we don’t need new rules to protect net neutrality, because even without rules in place, they’ve never blocked traffic in any harmful way and don’t particularly want to in the future either. However, one internet business says they have proof it happens — and the way the ISPs are doing it can have a huge effect not only on the quality of internet traffic, but on the safety of it, too. [More]