(Myszka)

Coca-Cola, Pepsi Once Again Fund Study Claiming Diet Soda Is Better For You Than Water

Back in 2014, the soft drink industry funded a study that, coincidentally, concluded that diet soda is better for weight loss than water. These same companies are at it again, not only providing the backing for another study extolling the virtues of diet drinks, but also — according to new reports — directly paying money to the researchers involved. [More]

(Coyoty)

Science Says: You’ll Order More Food & Booze If Your Waiter Isn’t Skinny

It’s a stereotype of the swanky metropolitan restaurant — only hiring wait staff that looks like they just slinked off the pages of Vogue or the runways of Milan — but the results of a recent study seem to indicate that restaurants could pad their bottom lines by hiring servers with a little more padding. [More]

(Karen Chappell)

University Ripped For Pushing Chocolate Milk As Concussion Treatment

A University of Maryland program that “promotes the development and commercialization of products and processes through industry/university research partnerships,” is being criticized for not just declaring that a particular brand of chocolate milk can improve cognitive skills of athletes who suffered a concussion, but for making that declaration without releasing any data to back it up. [More]

Pink Potato Slime May One Day Save Us All From Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

Pink Potato Slime May One Day Save Us All From Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

When root vegetables are stored in an area that’s too damp, they can grow a pink slime that breaks down cell walls and is generally gross. The rot comes from a bacteria, called Clostridium puniceum, that normally only grows only in areas with no oxygen. Why would it grow in an environment where there’s plenty of oxygen? The answer is in the slime. [More]

(Reactions on YouTube)

Science Tackles Very Important Question: What’s The Best Cheese For A Gooey Grilled Cheese Sandwich?

There are some things we don’t need scientists to tell us — like the fact that cheese is delicious and was created by the dairy gods to please us — but there are other questions we need answered by the professionals in order to live our best lives. Like what the ideal kind of cheese is for a perfectly gooey, melty grilled cheese. Here comes the science! [More]

Copyright Office Rules: Yes, Security Researchers May Hack Cars (And A Couple Other Things) For Science

Copyright Office Rules: Yes, Security Researchers May Hack Cars (And A Couple Other Things) For Science

Copyright law is surprisingly pervasive. It affects everything from computers to cars (and tractors). The law says you’re not allowed to circumvent DRM on anything for any reason… except for a big pile of things you actually legally can. Those exemptions get re-evaluated every three years, and today the new list is out. [More]

Toyota Plans To Have Self-Driving Car For The Masses By 2020

Toyota Plans To Have Self-Driving Car For The Masses By 2020

Toyota attempted to break away from the self-driving car fanfare last month by announcing it would instead invest $50 million into creating “life-saving intelligent” vehicles that weren’t necessarily autonomous. Today, the company made it clear that it’s also pursuing the fully driver-less route, revealing plans to release a commercially available self-driving car by 2020. [More]

Study Says Ancient North American Civilizations Shared Our Devotion To Caffeine

Study Says Ancient North American Civilizations Shared Our Devotion To Caffeine

If this were a celebrity weekly the above headline would read, “Ancient Civilizations — They’re Just Like Us!” But it’s not, so let’s just say that maybe getting out of bed wasn’t so easy without beverages that pack a caffeinated kick even thousands of years ago. [More]

Toyota Investing $50M Into “Life-Saving Intelligent” Vehicles

Toyota Investing $50M Into “Life-Saving Intelligent” Vehicles

There’s a lot of talk these days about the inevitable arrival of self-driving cars and the implications they will have on safety, insurance, traffic, and fuel costs, but Toyota has announced an investment in new research to develop “life-saving intelligent” vehicles that aren’t necessarily self-driving, but which could ideally combine the best of the autonomous car with one driven by a real human. [More]

(Barbara L. Hanson)

Scientists Working Hard To Save Us All From Rapidly Melting Ice Cream Cones

It’s a hot day, you’ve got a cool treat — it’s inevitable. That ice cream scoop, once so perfect in its rounded form, is going to melt, forcing you to fight the age-old battle against drips with your tongue as your only weapon. Take heart, dessert warriors: there are scientists out there who are trying to help us all, by developing an ice cream that takes a bit longer to melt. [More]

(Robert S. Donovan)

Butter Can Be Bad For Your Health, Concludes Study Paid For By Dairy Industry. Wait, What?

When an industry funds a scientific study of what they do or produce, you can roll your eyes and safely assume that the data will show that the phenomenon being studied is healthy or at least not actively harmful. Right? No, not necessarily. A study evaluating the health effects of eating butter regularly surprised cynics by showing that the substance raised study participants’ cholesterol. [More]

Genius Scientists Have Developed Bacon-Flavored Seaweed Because Clearly That Is Necessary

Genius Scientists Have Developed Bacon-Flavored Seaweed Because Clearly That Is Necessary

If I had a nickel for every time I was munching on a piece of seaweed and thought, “This would be better if it tasted like the bacon of the sea,” I would have zero nickels. But because people love all things that taste like that savory pork product, of course a group of scientists have figured out how to make seaweed-flavored bacon. [More]

(Neal Fowler)

Self-Driving Cars: Fewer Accidents, But More Motion Sickness

Cars increasingly drive themselves. If tech companies have their way, then entirely autonomous vehicles will be the future as soon as possible. But that future isn’t exactly primed to be glorious for everyone. For those of us at all prone to motion sickness, that future — despite being lower on accidents and higher on energy efficiency — is not going to be fun. [More]

Guy Pours Molten Aluminum Into Watermelon Because He Knew We Couldn’t Resist Watching The Video

(TheBackYardScientist)

There is no question we never fail to answer in this Internet age, and it’s, “What’s gonna happen next?” We have to know. We were born needing to know. And so of course, we must click a button and find out what could possibly occur when some guy pours molten aluminum into a watermelon and films it. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Science Says You Shop Differently If You’re Looking Up At Products

Just about everyone knows that the vital shelf space on a supermarket shelf is right below eye level, where your eyes are naturally drawn to products and you don’t have to crouch or crane your neck to see. A new study claims that vertical positioning on a shelf doesn’t just impact whether or not we see a product, but what kinds of purchasing decisions we make. [More]

(AngryJulieMonday)

Swiss Researchers Working On Telescopic Contact Lenses That Activate With A Wink

Though the idea of having anything other than a regular contact lens on one’s eye might provoke a few uncomfortable blinks just thinking about it for some, there could be a whole lot more going on to aid human vision in the future, with developments made recently by Swiss researchers working on contacts that have tiny telescopes in them. [More]

Algorithms are a vast improvement on this. (Great Beyond)

Future Travel Apps Will Plan Your Road Trip Bathroom Breaks

A three-hour drive is never a three-hour drive, thanks to traffic snarls, pit stops, and weather conditions. While current mapping apps are better able to predict how long it will take us to get somewhere, what if they could also recommend the best time and place for you to stop based on past traffic data? An algorithm from researchers at MIT might help real-life travelers do this. [More]

(Chris Rief aka Spodie Odie)

Why Does Popcorn Pop, Anyway?

There is perhaps no other sound in the culinary world that evokes immediate recognition quite like the noise popcorn makes when it’s popping, whether in a pan on the stove, a bag in the microwave or some kind of popping machine. But while we know the temperature at which popcorn pops*, why exactly corn makes that popping noise when turning itself into those fluffy kernels is a question science hadn’t quite answered yet… until now [cue suspenseful music]. [More]