San Francisco Wants High-Rise Verizon And Visa Ads To Come Down Before Super Bowl

San Francisco Wants High-Rise Verizon And Visa Ads To Come Down Before Super Bowl

With visitors coming to town for a high-profile sporting event next week, two high-rise buildings in San Francisco sold exterior ad space to Verizon and to Visa. There’s a problem, though: the ads, which are 15 and seven stories high respectively, are illegal, and the city wants them to come down before the Super Bowl. [More]

(C x 2)

Super Bowl Tickets Going For Record Prices In The Resale Market

If you’re planning on heading to California on Feb. 7 to catch the Super Bowl showdown between the Denver Broncos and the Carolina Panthers, be ready to have your bank account sacked. Tickets for the big game are currently selling for record-high prices.
[More]

San Francisco Votes Down Restrictions On AirBNB Rentals

San Francisco Votes Down Restrictions On AirBNB Rentals

If you don’t live or work in San Francisco and you aren’t an AirBNB host, you probably haven’t heard of Proposition F. The proposition asked the people of San Francisco to decide the future of short-term rentals through AirBNB and similar services, limiting the number of days per year a space could be rented to 75 and creating stricter penalties for hosts who disrupt their neighbors’ lives. The measure failed. [More]

Lyft Can Send You Free Zombies On Demand For Halloween

Lyft Can Send You Free Zombies On Demand For Halloween

Companies that send vehicles on demand also enjoy giving people the ability to summon other things with the power of their smartphones, like when Uber let people in select cities summon puppies and kittens or free fruit deliveries when the company was suspended from giving rides in Germany. Lyft’s Halloween publicity stunt is less cuddly and more spooky: they’ll send you zombies on demand if you order one. [More]

(Adam Fagen)

San Francisco & L.A. Block App That Helped Drivers Dispute Parking Tickets

Fixed is a smartphone app that tried to help drivers dispute parking tickets, but that aspect of the service is no longer usable in San Francisco, Los Angeles, or Oakland after those cities blocked the company’s access to their parking enforcement websites. [More]

The building in San Francisco's Mission district is now being renovated, "presumably for wealthier tenants," notes the judge. [image via Google Maps]

San Francisco Landlord Charged $4K/Month In Rent For Rodent-Infested “Death Trap” Apartments

A San Francisco man who fancied himself a landlord and building manager — but who apparently failed to do more than just collect rent that he didn’t always pay up the ladder — has been ordered to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to tenants who paid exorbitant sums to live in “squalid” conditions with phantom appliances, exposed wiring, and rodents run amok. [More]

Google Wants To Get Into Fresh Grocery Delivery Game

Google Wants To Get Into Fresh Grocery Delivery Game

After years of running its Google Express service — which offers same-day delivery on merchandise and packaged foods from a variety of retailers to customers in a handful of markets around the country — the Internet giant is now reportedly confident enough to try its hand at bringing fresh food and groceries to consumers’ doors. [More]

Comcast To Finally Start Including (Some) Elderly In Low-Cost Broadband Plans

Comcast To Finally Start Including (Some) Elderly In Low-Cost Broadband Plans

Comcast’s low-cost Internet Essentials program, cooked up during its acquisition of NBC as a way for the company to look good when trying to appease lawmakers and regulators, has been criticized for having eligibility standards that effectively lock out the elderly and childless. The company even recently fought back against California’s attempt to expand eligibility for the program. But today the company announced that it’s expanding Essentials coverage to include older low-income users, but only in the San Francisco area. [More]

Uber Updates App To Show The Difference Between Hailing A Ride And Ordering Lunch

Following a bit of consumer confusion related to rolling its ride-hailing and food ordering options into the same app back in June, Uber has finally pushed out an update aiming to ensure people looking for a ride don’t order a sandwich instead. Along with now prominently displaying separate buttons for requesting a ride and ordering via UberEATS, the update includes an expansion of the food delivery service to San Francisco. [More]

(Matt McGee)

Google Slaps Air Pollution Monitoring Systems On Street View Cars In San Francisco

The next time you see a Google Street View car cruising down your block, it might be doing more than just snapping photos — it could be tracking air pollution.
[More]

Bar Sues NFL & DirecTV, Alleging NFL Sunday Ticket Is Illegal Monopoly

Bar Sues NFL & DirecTV, Alleging NFL Sunday Ticket Is Illegal Monopoly

NFL Sunday Ticket — a pricey add-on sports package that offers live access to every out-of-market Sunday afternoon NFL game — is exclusively available through DirecTV, and will remain that way for years to come. But some bar owners allege that the satellite company’s deal with the NFL creates an illegal monopoly. [More]

(Chris Camargo)

San Francisco Creates New Office To Regulate Airbnb, Other Short-Term Rentals

The city of San Francisco and Airbnb have a somewhat contentious relationship, most recently involving tens of millions of dollars in back-taxes the short-term rental company agreed to pay the city earlier this year. Now, to ensure things continue to go smoothly for renters and rentees of services like Airbnb, the city has created a new office for the sole purpose of enforcing rules regarding vacation and short-term rentals. [More]

(donbuciak)

San Francisco Officials Considering A Health Warning On Ads For Sodas, Sugary Drinks

Although a proposed tax on sodas and sugary drinks didn’t fly in San Francisco, officials are now mulling the idea of slapping a health warning on advertisements appearing within the city limits for sugary beverages. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Class Action Suit Filed In California Over Wells Fargo’s Alleged Customer Account Abuses

A lawsuit filed earlier this month by the city of Los Angeles accuses Wells Fargo of pushing employees to engage in fraudulent conduct with regard to consumer accounts in order to meet the bank’s sales quotas. Now, one of those customers has filed his own lawsuit against the San Francisco-based bank alleging the same misconduct deceived and defrauded consumers across the country. [More]

(jayRaz)

Airbnb Pays “Tens Of Millions” To San Francisco To Settle Hotel Tax Bill

Airbnb finally gave in to San Francisco’s demands that it fork over a bunch of cash to pay back-taxes after failing to pay the city’s 14% hotel tax going back a few years. Airbnb wouldn’t say how much it had paid, but officials had said it ran into the millions of dollars. [More]

(Jason Cook)

It’s About To Get A Lot More Difficult To Run An Airbnb Empire In San Francisco

A common complaint against people who rent out their homes on Airbnb and similar sites is that some hosts aren’t just renting out a spare room or letting strangers use their house when it’s empty for a weekend or two, but that some hosts are effectively hoteliers and landlords who don’t have any connection to the places they let out. In an effort to crack down on this practice, the city of San Francisco is about to require that all Airbnb hosts register with the city, and that they do so in person. [More]

More Horrible People Caught On Camera Stealing Packages From Porch

More Horrible People Caught On Camera Stealing Packages From Porch

This is why I never have any packages left at my door without a signature. Yet another person’s holiday has been spoiled by sticky-fingered thieves swiping packages left on someone’s porch, and once again the crime is captured on security camera footage. [More]

San Francisco, L.A. Sue Uber For Allegedly Misleading Consumers On Drivers’ Safety, Other Issues

San Francisco, L.A. Sue Uber For Allegedly Misleading Consumers On Drivers’ Safety, Other Issues

After hearing several tales of consumers being mistreated or accosted by Uber drivers, one might begin to question the company’s “industry-leading” practices when it comes to screening drivers. It appears two California district attorneys are doing just that by filing a civil suit against the company for a number of issues including allegedly misleading consumers on its background checks for drivers. [More]