The Ultimate "Rule 240" List

The Ultimate "Rule 240" List

Some airlines still call it “Rule 240″ and others a “contract of carriage” but no matter what the name, it still means the same thing: power to the traveler. But which airlines still use it and how much does it protect a traveler?

Will Someone Please Just Tell Us If Rule 240 @#$@*^% Exists?

Will Someone Please Just Tell Us If Rule 240 @#$@*^% Exists?

There’s been a heated debate going on amongst travel experts as to whether or not the famed “Rule 240″ still exists, and if so, in what form does the rule take?

4 Facts About Rule 240

4 Facts About Rule 240

Last week, travel consumer advocate Christopher Elliott listed four secrets about rule 240—that borderline mythic rule that describes how an airline will behave regarding a canceled or delayed flight—that he says are too often overlooked by travel experts and regular folk:”It’s hardly an all-powerful provision that can be invoked by every stranded passenger. Somewhere between myth and a magic bullet lies the truth about Rule 240.”

No More "Rule 240" For American Airlines

No More "Rule 240" For American Airlines

Reader Tom writes in to let us know that American Airlines will no longer rebook you on another airline in the event of a delay or cancellation. He attempted to lay the old “Rule 240″ on them and was told that Rule 240 had been changed to “Rule 18″… whatever that is.

Don't Fly Without A Copy Of Rule 240

Don't Fly Without A Copy Of Rule 240

If it’s the airline’s fault that your flight is delayed or canceled or you missed your connection, whip out a copy of their Rule 240.