(jayRaz)

RIAA Offers To Reduce $222K Verdict Against File-Sharer If She’ll Say Something Nice About RIAA

Have you ever been compelled to make an insincere apology just because you knew it would get you out of trouble? The much-loathed Recording Industry Association of America made that sort of offer to file-sharer Jammie Thomas-Rasset, offering to reduce her $222,000 penalty if she just went on the record to say some kind words about the RIAA’s anti-piracy platform. [More]

(emilybean)

Court Upholds $675,000 Fee College Student Must Pay For Illegally Sharing 30 Songs

It’s been almost two years since a former student from Boston was re-ordered to pay $675,000 for illegally sharing 30 songs. That judgment had been downgraded to $67,500 by one court and deemed unconstitutional, and then ticked right back up again. Another federal appeals court has just ruled he’s still on the hook. [More]

Google Switches Up Its Search Engine To Shun Sites Suspected Of Peddling Pirated Content

Google Switches Up Its Search Engine To Shun Sites Suspected Of Peddling Pirated Content

Google is making some tweaks in how its search engine runs in order to crack down on any sites that could possibly be promoting or hosting pirated entertainment content. As for why, well, there are a few prevailing thoughts. Perhaps it’s because the entertainment industry wouldn’t get off Google’s back for letting users find free movies and music on the Internet or maybe Google just wants to impress the cool kids of Hollywood so it doesn’t get sued. [More]

Record Companies Reportedly Hiring Students To Snitch On Their Peers

Record Companies Reportedly Hiring Students To Snitch On Their Peers

It seems recording companies would rather not do the dirty work of seeking out students pirating music, instead hiring other students to snitch on their peers over in Europe. The four big labels — EMI, Sony, Universal and Warner –Â are reportedly working on anti-piracy strategies with companies who will go to great lengths to take down students. [More]

People Are Actually Buying Music Again

People Are Actually Buying Music Again

Reports of the music industry’s death may be premature. According to the results of a new study, not only are more people buying music, but some are doing so after hearing the tunes for free on the Internet. [More]

RIAA On Illegal Dexter Downloads: "It Wasn't Us"

RIAA On Illegal Dexter Downloads: "It Wasn't Us"

Earlier this week, we told you about how the torrent freaks at TorrentFreak claimed to have discovered that some people at anti-piracy stalwart the Recording Industry Association of America had been illegally using BitTorrent to download copyrighted material, including five full seasons of Showtime hit Dexter. RIAA has since come out with an explanation, one that sounds exactly like the defense used by the very people it has pushed to have prosecuted — “it wasn’t us.” [More]

Report: Someone At The RIAA Downloaded $9 Million Worth Of Pirated Dexter Episodes

Report: Someone At The RIAA Downloaded $9 Million Worth Of Pirated Dexter Episodes

The hallowed halls of the Recording Industry Association of America, where all music is bought at full price and never shared, lest people face violations of up to $150,000 per pirated item, has reportedly been infiltrated by ne’er-do-wells who think they can BitTorrent copyrighted material at work and not be caught. [More]

Appeals Court Rules $675,000 File-Sharing Judgment Is Constitutional After All

Appeals Court Rules $675,000 File-Sharing Judgment Is Constitutional After All

Last year, a Boston college student caught a break when a judge reduced an earlier file-sharing judgment against him from $675,000 to $67,500, calling the earlier figure unconstitutional. Now a federal appeals court has wiped that relief away by deciding the Constitution is cool after all with the $675,000 fee and has reinstated the earlier judgment. [More]

Tennessee Lawmakers Pass Bill Making It A Crime To Share Your Netflix Password

Tennessee Lawmakers Pass Bill Making It A Crime To Share Your Netflix Password

If you’ve ever let a friend or family member know your password for subscription services like Netflix or Rhapsody so they can watch a movie or listen to a song, we hope you don’t live in Tennessee, where state legislators have passed a bill making it a crime. [More]

California Law Would Allow Raids Of Suspected Piracy Facilities Without Warrants

California Law Would Allow Raids Of Suspected Piracy Facilities Without Warrants

If anti-piracy California legislation becomes law, authorities will be able to enter facilities suspected of pirating movie and music discs and seize equipment without first receiving warrants. [More]

LimeWire To Pay $105 Million To Record Labels

LimeWire To Pay $105 Million To Record Labels

Last October, a federal court shut down peer-to-peer file-sharing service LimeWire. Yesterday, the defunct company agreed to fork over $105 million to to settle a copyright infringement suit brought by 13 record labels. [More]

Jury Slaps File Sharer With $1.5 Million Penalty Over 24 Songs

Jury Slaps File Sharer With $1.5 Million Penalty Over 24 Songs

The third time was not the charm for Jamie Thomas-Rasset, who has spent the last several years wrapped up legal wranglings with the Recording Industry Association of America over 24 songs she downloaded through Kazaa back when people still used Kazaa. The latest development — a jury in her third trial has found her liable for $1.5 million ($62,500/song) in damages to Capitol Records. [More]

Federal Court Shuts Down LimeWire With Permanent Injunction

Federal Court Shuts Down LimeWire With Permanent Injunction

LimeWire, the Gnutella-based peer-to-peer file-sharing service, is no more. Major record labels, also known as file-sharers’ archnemesis the RIAA, obtained an injunction from a U.S. District Court judge in New York City that stops Limewire from distributing their software or facilitating any file-sharing. [More]

Judge Slashes RIAA's $675,000 File Sharing Award To $67,500

Judge Slashes RIAA's $675,000 File Sharing Award To $67,500

A federal judge yesterday bench slapped the Recording Industry of America, calling a jury’s $675,000 verdict against file sharer Joel Tenenbaum both eye-popping and unconstitutional. The judge struck a strikingly populist tone in reducing the verdict to $67,500, arguing that the same legal reasoning that protects large corporations from excessive punitive damages also protects “ordinary people” like Tenenbaum. [More]

4 Years And 2 Trials Later, The $1.92 Million RIAA Case Continues

4 Years And 2 Trials Later, The $1.92 Million RIAA Case Continues

Remember Jammie Thomas-Rasset? She was accused of sharing 24 songs on Kazaa in 2006. Two trials and four years later, the case still isn’t over. They’re now trying to avoid a third trial. [More]

Like Everything Else Copyright Problems Are Simpler On TV

Like Everything Else Copyright Problems Are Simpler On TV

In TV Land, where murders are solved and prosecuted in an hour and family issues are wrapped up in a cool 30 minutes there is a new problem being simplified — copyright infringement. Despite being brought to us by Rupert Murdoch, Fox’s Glee is full of depictions of behavior that News Corp supposedly objects too. [More]

Pirate Bay Spreads Word About '$675K Mix Tape Tribute To Nabbed Downloader

Pirate Bay Spreads Word About '$675K Mix Tape Tribute To Nabbed Downloader

Remember Joel Tenenbaum, the guy who was busted for downloading 30 songs and ordered to pay $675,000 to the Recording Industry of America?