(Geoff Fox)

Can Retailers Make Us Stop Returning So Much Stuff?

After the holiday shopping frenzy is over, frenzy season isn’t yet complete: in malls and in post offices alike, shoppers then go into an item-returning and gift-card-spending frenzy. Unfortunately, this costs retailers a lot of money. Instead of accepting the cost of returns as a recurring annual thing, can they find a way to reduce them? [More]

The Good, Bad & Ugly Of Stores’ Holiday Return Policies

The Good, Bad & Ugly Of Stores’ Holiday Return Policies

As much as we’d all love to believe that everything we give to our loved ones — and everything we receive from them — this holiday season will be exactly what we want and need, and that it will fit our bodies and/or be compatible with everything we already own. But odds are that a lot of us will be returning at least one thing to a store in the days and weeks after Christmas, so it helps to know retailers’ return policies. [More]

Walmart Workers Don’t Understand Store’s Return Policy, But Think They Do

Walmart Workers Don’t Understand Store’s Return Policy, But Think They Do

In the retail shopping realm, there are few things worse than running up against an employee who is not only mistaken about his or her store’s policies, but insists that you are the one who does not understand the finer points of that retailer’s rules. [More]

(meg)

Sears Settles With New York Over Deceptive Refunds

For more than two years, Sears offered “Come Back Cash” promotions that rewarded customers with Sears gift cards for purchases over certain qualifying thresholds. But if a customer returned an item, they would have the proportionate value of that gift card deducted from the refund, even if the total value of the purchase was still above the threshold for meriting a gift card. [More]

Don’t Notice Appliance Delivery Damage Within 48 Hours? Too Bad

Don’t Notice Appliance Delivery Damage Within 48 Hours? Too Bad

Sometimes you buy a new appliance, but don’t use it right away. Maybe you just don’t have any dirty clothes or dishes for a while, or the room where the appliance goes just isn’t ready yet. That’s what happened to Russell when he bought a new washer from Home Depot: it was damaged during delivery, but he didn’t know it at the time. Since he didn’t report it within 48 hours, he’s stuck with the broken appliance, in a sad and desolate land between where Home Depot’s return policy ends and LG’s warranty begins. [More]

Victoria’s Secret Sends $50 Apology Gift Card, Still Doesn’t Make Any Sense

(Mary T.)

Last week, we shared the story of Debra, who returned $114 worth of merchandise to Victoria’s Secret, but only received $97 back. When she complained, Vicky’s response was that sending items back meant that her purchase was under the $100 threshold to get a $15 off discount. Except, um, her purchase was well over the limit, and she sent everything back. She complained again, and the refunded her $15. After our post ran, the chain tracked her down and sent an apology and a $50 gift certificate, along with a second explanation that doesn’t make any sense either. [More]

(Mary T.)

Victoria’s Secret Charges Me $15 For The Privilege Of Returning Stuff

When Debra placed an online order from Victoria’s Secret and then returned everything unworn, she didn’t know that she would have to pay an underpants rental fee. She returned merchandise that she had paid $114.16 for, and received $96.69 back. Was that a shipping charge? No, Debra paid to ship the items back herself. Did the items go on sale and she didn’t have a receipt? No, that wasn’t it either. She bought them during a “$15 off a $100 purchase” promotion, and Vicky’s kept the $15 discount that they had given her. Huh? [More]

(Mike Rollerson)

Zombie Amazon Returns More Common Than You Might Think

Earlier this week, we asked whether our readers had any experience with zombie refunds: items that you sent back to a retailer, only to have your refund later reversed for no clear reason. We heard from a surprising number of people whose transactions have risen from the archives and devoured their bank accounts. [More]

Is Best Buy's return policy about to be trimmed in half?

Best Buy Changing Its Return Policy From 30 Days To 15 Days

UPDATE: Documents provided to Consumerist by Best Buy insiders confirms this policy change. Click for details. [More]

(CBS Sacramento)

Some Walmarts Still Short-Changing Customers On Gift Receipt Returns

Nearly two years after Walmart stores were first caught short-changing customers who returned items using gift receipts, and following numerous later reports that the practice was continuing, it looks like some Walmarts have just not gotten the message. [More]

(StevenW.)

Skullcandy Won’t Honor Earbud Warranty Because I Used Logic When Mailing Them Back

Stephen goes through a lot of headphones, apparently. He had three defective pair of Skullcandy earbuds to return, so he complained about them and got return authorizations for all three. He sent them back using the mailing labels Skullcandy had given him. Unfortunately, he didn’t stick all three mailing labels on the outside of the box, and now Skullcandy says that means they’ll only replace one of them. [More]

(me and the sysop)

Target Employee Lies To Me About Refund Policy, Short-Changes Me 25% Of Purchase Price

If you buy something for $10 and have to return it a couple weeks later because it’s defective, you should get the full $10 back, even if it’s since gone on sale, right? This is a lesson that never made it to the employees of one Target in Tennessee. [More]

Someday.

Philips Takes Headphones Back For A Refund, Check Has Been ‘In The Mail’ Since August

Adam bought a set of really nice Philips headphones, but they wouldn’t play nice with his Nintendo DS. He ended up sending them back to Philips for a refund. While it was good that they offered him a refund in the first place, what they had trouble doing was actually getting that refund to him in a timely fashion. Or ever. [More]

(CBS Sacramento)

What Information Can Retailers Store When They Scan Your ID For Returns?

For years, we’ve been writing about the now-rapidly growing practice of retailers scanning IDs when customers make returns. It’s never been clear exactly what information is taken when your card is swiped, but we now know that the data could basically include everything on your driver’s license. [More]

(Third Eye Imagination)

Ashley Furniture Wants To Charge Restocking Fee For Out-Of-Stock Item

If you order a backordered item that was never in stock in the first place, should you have to pay a restocking fee when you cancel the order? That’s the quandary that Emmanuel finds himself in. Store employees failed to tell him that the couch he wanted was on backorder until after he had already paid, so he came back to the store a day later to cancel the order. Ashley couldn’t do that…without a 30% restocking fee. What did they restock, precisely? [More]

(Karen_Chappell)

7 Roadblocks To Returning Gifts

Sure, right now is the season of gift-giving. But soon enough, we’ll change gears and consumers will be lined up to return some of the things they’ve been given. So there are some things you should be aware of before Dec. 26. [More]

The game he never wanted.

Newegg Deducts $70 From Return For Cost Of “Free” Video Game

After years of buying electronics from Newegg, Consumerist reader Willie says he won’t be doing business with the e-tailer in the future because of the way his friend was treated by the company. [More]

(C_K_L)

Find Out What Info Retailers Have Been Tracking On Your Returned Purchases

A growing number of retailers have been requiring customers not only show a photo ID when returning a purchase, they have also been scanning those IDs into a database that other retailers will use to determine whether or not you’re a problem returner. [More]