(ralph)

Home Depot Declined My Return, But I’ve Only Returned One Thing There

Having returned stuff to Home Depot before, Stephen knew that he could expect to have his driver’s license scanned and the transaction logged by The Retail Equation, a company that logs information about people who return merchandise at a variety of retailers. What he didn’t expect was to be told that his return of some cabinet parts would be denied after he had only ever returned one $10 item to Home Depot before. [More]

Zulily Will Test Accepting Merchandise Returns

Zulily Will Test Accepting Merchandise Returns

The great flash-site boom of the past decade has one great success story that has survived the recession: Zulily, which started out selling children’s clothing and toys and has slowly expanded into clothes and accessories for women. That expansion means that the company is trying something that it previously found unthinkable: they’re testing merchandise returns. [More]

Which Items Get Returned To Sephora Most Often?

Which Items Get Returned To Sephora Most Often?

Sephora is a magical playground filled with very expensive substances that grown-ups can slather on themselves. Yet what if that $29 mascara or $45 foundation just doesn’t look right on you? The cosmetics retailer has a famously generous return policy, even for items that have been opened and used, and there are certain items that end up returned more often than others. Which are they? [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Bed Bath & Beyond Will Change Return Policy For Items Without Receipt

If you’ve been bringing used items back to Bed Bath & Beyond long after purchase and without a receipt, the home goods superstore is on to you. The news slipped out a little early that the chain plans to tighten up its relatively lax return policy on April 20th of this year, ending a long run with a policy that most customers enjoyed and a few abused. [More]

Forgot To Return A Purchase? Maybe Your Credit Card Issuer Can Help

Forgot To Return A Purchase? Maybe Your Credit Card Issuer Can Help

While racking up unsecured debt is generally a bad thing, there can be hidden advantages to using your credit card for everyday purchases. Two benefits that we often recommend as weapons for consumer justice are chargebacks and warranty extensions, but here’s another one that you may not be aware of: return period extensions. Yes, buying with some credit cards can give you longer to return an unwanted item to the retailer. [More]

After You Return Something To A Store, Where Does It Go?

After You Return Something To A Store, Where Does It Go?

When you bring a piece of clothing back to the store because it’s defefctive or used or you just didn’t like it, where does it go? “Away” isn’t the answer: billions of dollars’ worth of items get returned to stores every year, and not all of them are fit to go back on the shelf. At retailers like Nordstrom, Costco, or L.L. Bean that have famously generous return policies, where does all of that returned stuff end up? [More]

(Geoff Fox)

Can Retailers Make Us Stop Returning So Much Stuff?

After the holiday shopping frenzy is over, frenzy season isn’t yet complete: in malls and in post offices alike, shoppers then go into an item-returning and gift-card-spending frenzy. Unfortunately, this costs retailers a lot of money. Instead of accepting the cost of returns as a recurring annual thing, can they find a way to reduce them? [More]

Best Buy Doesn’t Want You To Know They Take Returns Without A Receipt

Best Buy Doesn’t Want You To Know They Take Returns Without A Receipt

Every store has two sets of policies: the official ones distributed to customers, and the policies from the other end that employees learn in training. A source inside Best Buy contacted us recently to explain how it’s possible to return items to Best Buy without a receipt. Yes, it is possible. No, customers aren’t supposed to know that. [More]

Google’s Defective Phone Policy Is Tough If You’re On A Fixed Income

Google’s Defective Phone Policy Is Tough If You’re On A Fixed Income

We hear that the newest version of Google’s Nexus smartphone, the Nexus 5, is a fine device. Reader Michael has heard that, too. He wouldn’t know: The phone that he ordered a few weeks ago didn’t work right out of the box. He was stuck. He had ordered the $350 Nexus because his previous phone broke, but couldn’t afford put the total on hold on a credit or debit card so Google could ship him a new phone right away. [More]

(othree)

Amazon Now Using Lockers For Return Shipping

Do you know what’s an even worse problem for online retailers than customers who never get their packages? Shipping back the items that customers did receive, but don’t want. Fortunately, Amazon has found a way around this problem: since late last year, they’ve using their lockers designed for deliveries to send products in the other direction. [More]

The Defective Xbox, The Defective Kmart, And The Defective Exchange Process

The Defective Xbox, The Defective Kmart, And The Defective Exchange Process

Evan had a problem. Well, first, he had an Xbox One, which was a pretty great thing. He had picked it up at a Kmart in a different city while visiting friends, because they had it in stock. When it began to make can opener noises a few weeks later, it would have been simplest to exchange it for a new Xbox at Kmart. Naturally, that was impossible. [More]

If Walmart Won’t Take Your Printer Back, Don’t Throw It At The Customer Service Rep

If Walmart Won’t Take Your Printer Back, Don’t Throw It At The Customer Service Rep

When we advise unhappy consumers to escalate their customer service complaints, we mean to take your issue to a store manager or someone at corporate HQ. We don’t suggest that you ramp up your anger by smashing things and tossing printers at store employees. [More]

How Does An Unlimited Return Policy Help L.L. Bean?

How Does An Unlimited Return Policy Help L.L. Bean?

This summer, outdoors equipment co-op REI made a change: they cut back on their return policy. They no longer accept any item back for any reason indefinitely. Other companies continue the practice, most notably L.L. Bean and Costco. It must be expensive and there must be customers who abuse it. So why do they do it? [More]

Simple Human Replaces Self-Destructing Trash Can In Simple, Easy Transaction

Simple Human Replaces Self-Destructing Trash Can In Simple, Easy Transaction

Sure, a foot pedal lid trash can is a pretty mundane household item, but try going without it after you get used to having one. Annemarie’s Simple Human trash can jettisoned a part when she stepped on its pedal one day. It had a year left on the five-year warranty, so she called up the company. Maybe they could replace the lid? [More]

(Scurzuzu)

Where Is The Item I Sent Back To Sears? Don’t Ask Sears Or UPS, They Don’t Know

What ring? Victoria ordered a ring from Sears, but wasn’t happy with it and sent it back. That’s the whole point of the return process, right? Only the point isn’t supposed to be that the item disappears into the ether and the retailer shrugs. At least we’d like to think so. [More]

(rutlo)

Sam’s Club Takes Back Ancient Desk Chair, Delights Customer

People come in different shapes and sizes, and companies make products to fit us. Well, the products are supposed to. Reader Chris got a wonderful desk chair designed for people who are, as he puts it, “big and tall” for Christmas. Christmas 2011. When it broke, he was stuck: surely the warranty was up and the retailer wouldn’t take it back. Right? [More]

(Chris Rief aka Spodie Odie)

REI Revises Return Policy: Must Be Within 1 Year Of Purchase

REI is a retailer of outdoor equipment and claims to be the world’s largest consumer co-op. They’re also famous for their generous return policy, similar to that of Consumerist favorites like L.L. Bean and Costco: they’ll take anything back for just about any reason, indefinitely. At least, they used to. That policy changes, as of today. [More]

(The Joy Of The Mundane)

Between Microsoft And PayPal, Somewhere I Have A Refund

Steve bought a digital download of Windows 8, but decided that it wasn’t for him. He downgraded to Windows 7, got rid of all traces of the upgrade, and got a refund of the purchase price. At least that’s what Microsoft says. The refund is trapped in some kind of terrifying digital underworld between Microsoft and PayPal, serving as a warning. [More]