Longest-Serving Macy's Employee Retires After 73-Year Career

Longest-Serving Macy's Employee Retires After 73-Year Career

Rose Syracuse went to work at Macy’s flagship store in Herald Square when she was nineteen years old, and she stayed there until she retired. That’s unusual enough to us today, but that’s before you learn how long she worked there. She began work at the department store in 1939. She retired earlier this week at age 92 after a 73-year career behind the scenes. [More]

Septuagenarian Couple Scammed Inns And Hotels For Four Years

Septuagenarian Couple Scammed Inns And Hotels For Four Years

The next time you stay at a bed and breakfast and you see a kindly old couple lingering in the common room after breakfast, be suspicious! The Wolffs have been scamming inns, hotels, rented homes, and bed & breakfasts since 2005, reports the Boston Globe. They offer to pay via check, and until recently–when they stayed in one place so long that they were still around when the check bounced–nobody ever thought they might be pulling a fast one. They’re due in court this month for defrauding several inns over the past summer. [More]

AARP Really Really Needs Members

AARP Really Really Needs Members

Adam’s mom recently received an AARP invitation, which is not surprising since she’s nearing fifty. But we think AARP may want to pass a better filter over the address lists they’re buying, because a few days later Adam received the same invitation. Maybe AARP is trying to expand to seniors and their admirers—sort of like a backwards NAMBLA.

Internal Docs Prove Wachovia Knew About Telemarketer Rip-Offs All Along

Internal Docs Prove Wachovia Knew About Telemarketer Rip-Offs All Along

A woman sued Wachovia last year because it allowed a telemarketing scam company to process stolen payments through its banks, despite complaints from customers and warnings from other banks and federal authorities. Wachovia said it had no idea what was going on, but now documents have been revealed that prove people high up in the company not only knew, but that “the bank, in fact, solicited business from companies it knew had been accused of telemarketing crimes.” Why? How about millions of dollars of extra revenue from steep fees whenever a fraud-related chargeback went through? The lawyers for the woman are now seeking class-action status for the lawsuit.