(Michael G. Chan)

Hungry Shoppers Also Buy More Non-Food Stuff

It’s a long-held belief that shopping while hungry leads to a larger than normal grocery bill. A new study claims that you might want also want to avoid hitting the department store on an empty stomach. [More]

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York found that borrowers with the least amount of student loan debt were actually more likely to default.

Why Are Borrowers With Less Student Loan Debt More Likely To Default?

Just days after the Federal Reserve Bank of New York showed that student loan delinquency rates were once again on the rise, a new Fed report finds it’s student loan borrowers with the lowest levels of debt who typically are the most delinquent.
[More]

(Phil Jones)

Student Loan Debt Increased $77B In 2014, One In Nine Loans Now Past Due

Student loan debt reached an all-time high and delinquency rates continued to rise last year, according to a new report from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York found. [More]

(erocsid)

Researcher Says It Only Takes Minutes To Hack Most Smart Home Security Devices

With a security hack taking place just about everyday, consumers are more on-guard than ever when it comes to making sure their personal information are secure from ne’er-do-wells. But a new report points out that we might be inviting those hackers into our homes with open arms thanks to the less-than-optimal security of many smart home products. [More]

A majority of manufacturers reported storing driver data with third-parties.

Report: Automakers Fail To Protect Connected Cars From Security, Privacy Hacks

The newest models of connected cars come with everything from built-in navigation and entertainment systems to roadside assistance. While these features might make life behind the wheel a little easier, a new report found that not enough has been done to adequately protect those components from hackers. [More]

(Scurzuzu)

Report Spotlights Impact Of Payday Lenders On Most Vulnerable Communities

It’s no secret that payday loan storefronts often pop up in lower-income communities where consumers are more likely to need a quick infusion of cash to get to the next paycheck. A new report from the Howard University Center on Race and Wealth shines a light on the frequency with which the small-dollar, high-cost loans are opened in susceptible communities in the southern United States. [More]

(Chris Blakeley)

FTC: Credit Report Errors Continuing To Linger Years After Being Found

Two years ago, a Federal Trade Commission study found a surprisingly large percentage of consumers had discovered, and had corrected, errors on their credit reports. There were also several people who believed there were errors with their reports but had not yet reached a resolution. A new follow-up study from the FTC finds that nearly 70% of these disputes from 2012 are still unresolved. [More]

Older Americans report facing several issues when it comes to interactions with debt collectors.

CFPB Finds Older Consumers Face Illegal, Harassing Tactics From Debt Collectors

As if we hadn’t said it enough, but debt collectors are the worst, especially when they use illegal tactics to pry money from older American’s living on fixed incomes. A new report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau shines light on the issues older consumers face when it comes to their financial well-being. [More]

(Photos in the Sunset)

That “Wild Gulf Shrimp” You Bought Might Actually Be Farmed Whiteleg Shrimp

Just because you spent an hour searching the grocery store for the perfect bag of Wild Gulf Shrimp doesn’t mean you’re actually getting wild shrimp caught in the Gulf of Mexico.. In fact a new study released Thursday found that nearly a third of the shrimp products being sold in U.S. stores and restaurants aren’t what they seem to be. [More]

Consumers aged 35 to 44 were far more likely to have wages seized for debts than those in other age groups.

Report: Nearly Four Million Workers Had Wages Garnished For Consumer Debts In 2013

For most Americans every penny counts when it comes to their paycheck, but for some workers nearly a quarter of their wages are taken to pay for past debts in a process known as garnishment. The prevalence of this type of pay seizure grew significantly in the last few years leaving more consumers struggling financially. [More]

(kevinherzig007)

The Best Way For Students To Avoid High Fees With Campus Banking Products Is To Barely Use Them

All around the country, new and returning college students are being handed IDs they can use as debit cards or they’re being told they can have their aid disbursals deposited straight onto a school-branded card. It all seems incredibly convenient, especially for those who have limited experience handling their own finances, but these school-backed banking products are rarely the best available options for students, who could end up being nickel-and-dimed into debt.
[More]

FTC Asks Congress To Require Transparency From Data Brokers

FTC Asks Congress To Require Transparency From Data Brokers

Who would you say knows the most about you? Your family or friends, perhaps? Wrong. You likely have never met – and will never meet – the people who know the most about you: data brokers. These companies follow your every move on- and off-line to collect billions of data points about your life in an attempt to better target you for marketing campaigns and fraud prevention, among other things. [More]

FDA Finally Inspects Tainted Egg Farms, Discovers They're Unsanitary

FDA Finally Inspects Tainted Egg Farms, Discovers They're Unsanitary

Conditions at the two salmonella egg farms in Iowa are so bad that you’d think they were Tylenol factories, according to recent FDA inspections. Wait, I mean the first and only inspections. [More]

Brand Name Drug Prices Rise Significantly In Past Year

Brand Name Drug Prices Rise Significantly In Past Year

Here’s yet another reason to go for generic drugs when you can: drug makers keep raising prices on brand name products. If you group generics and brand names together, drug prices rose by 3.4% in 2009, according to an industry report. However, if you look at just brand name drugs as the AARP did in a new report, the average price hike was 8.3%. An earlier AARP report from May points out that if you look at specialty drugs “widely used by people in Medicare” then the hike jumps to 9.2%. [More]

Auto Dealers And Fake Foreclosure Relief Offers Top Consumer Complaints For Last Year

Auto Dealers And Fake Foreclosure Relief Offers Top Consumer Complaints For Last Year

The 2009 Consumer Complaint Survey Report is out, and it says that among the 18 states that participated in the survey, complaints about auto dealers topped the list for the second year in a row. However, the fastest-growing category of complaints were about fake foreclosure relief offers. [More]

Shoppers Love Costco And Dillard's, Say Target And Walmart Are Subpar

Shoppers Love Costco And Dillard's, Say Target And Walmart Are Subpar

Consumer Reports asked 30,000 readers to weigh in on the best and worst chain stores in the country, and it looks like people really love Costco and Dillard’s. Both stores received above average ratings in things like merchandise quality and value. On the other end of the spectrum, Target’s women’s fashion, jewelery and watches were rated below-average in quality. [More]

Supreme Court Makes It Easier To Sue Debt Collectors

Supreme Court Makes It Easier To Sue Debt Collectors

Last week, the Supreme Court ruled that debt collectors can’t use a “bona fide error” defense to avoid being sued for misinterpreting the Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (FDCPA). In other words, if a debt collection agency makes a demand that’s in violation of the Act, it can’t say it didn’t know any better. Well, it can, but you can go right ahead and sue. [More]

War Declared On Salt!

War Declared On Salt!

Are you tired of the high fructose corn syrup battles? Today the Institute of Medicine, part of the National Academy of Sciences, released a report that said Americans on average eat enough salt every second to kill a humpback whale kraken. I have not actually read the report, but it probably said something like that. It also said that public education campaigns have failed to reduce sodium intake, and voluntary self-regulation by the food industry hasn’t been effective. [More]