IKEA To Record Collectors: Don’t Freak Out About The Death Of Expedit Shelves

IKEA To Record Collectors: Don’t Freak Out About The Death Of Expedit Shelves

The LP has survived the 8-track, the cassette tape, the CDs, the MP3, and streaming audio. But will all that vinyl have a place to live now that IKEA is killing off collectors’ beloved Expedit shelving units? [More]

Psalm Book Believed To Be The First Book Ever Published In The U.S. Sells For Record $14.2M

Psalm Book Believed To Be The First Book Ever Published In The U.S. Sells For Record $14.2M

Maybe you’ve got some old books on your shelf, passed down from Gran’s days hiding in the hayloft dreaming about the land of Oz, or a family Bible that’s been in the family for over 100 years. But then there’s the book believed to be the first ever published in the United States — and as such, it’s quite a bit older and a lot more expensive than anything kicking around in Great Aunt Gertie’s attic. [More]

Warner Music Group Sold For $3.3 Billion

Warner Music Group Sold For $3.3 Billion

Billionaire investor Len Blavatnik will pay $3.3 billion to acquire Warner Music Group, which is currently owned by a private investment group controlled by Warner chief Edgar Bronfman. While $3 billion may seem like a high price to pay for a money-losing company with $2 billion in debt, Blavatnik faced competition from over a dozen other bidders, including Sony, Live Nation and Bertelsmann. [More]

Would Electronic Medical Records Make You Hide Things From Your Doctor?

Would Electronic Medical Records Make You Hide Things From Your Doctor?

The California HealthCare Foundation recently released the results of a survey on electronic medical records and consumer behavior. The survey found that 15% of people would hide things from their doctor if the medical record system shared anonymous data with other organizations. Another 33% weren’t sure, but would consider hiding something. [More]

Your Medical Records: Ask For Them!

Your Medical Records: Ask For Them!

Hospitals can be slow to respond for health records, writes CNN, which can cause serious problems if you’re moving a patient from one facility to another. Here are steps from that article on how to make sure you get your data as quickly as possible. [More]

Your Credit Report Isn't The Only Report You Should Monitor

Your Credit Report Isn't The Only Report You Should Monitor

When an insurer decides whether to offer you a new policy, or whether to raise rates on a current one, he most likely pulls a CLUE report that lists any homeowner or automobile insurance loss claims (or sometimes even just inquiries) that you’ve made over the past 3-7 years. Hopefully you monitor your consumer credit report for errors, but as you can see, that’s not the only one you should keep an eye on.

Get Your Data Out Of Google

Get Your Data Out Of Google

If you’re like the average Google user, you’ve now got a lot of personal data—emails, addresses, calendars, documents, photos and videos, maybe even health records—in their system. This is fine with them, because the Google Hive Mind needs all of this data to eventually become self aware and enslave us. However, if you ever want to get that information out of Google, the company has created something they call the Data Liberation Front to make it easier for you.

Medical Records Sold As Scrap Paper

Medical Records Sold As Scrap Paper

A fourth grade teacher in Salt Lake City, Utah, bought a box of scrap paper for $20 and discovered it was actually a box of medical records of 28 patients from Central Florida Regional Hospital. The hospital shipped the box via UPS to an audit company in Las Vegas last December. The hospital claims it had been tracking the box since February, but hadn’t told the patients. As for the teacher’s class, her next assignment for the students will be, “Apply for credit card offers using SSNs from the scrap paper box.”

Employees Play With Your Private Data And There Is Nothing You Can Do About It

Employees Play With Your Private Data And There Is Nothing You Can Do About It

Why play solitaire when you work for the utility company and can look up the mayor’s phone number? An Associated Press investigation reveals that casual snooping is widespread among employees who have access to large customer databases. According to one utility executive, it would be “difficult, if not impossible” to ferret out employees who use sensitive data for identity theft.

http://consumerist.com/2008/01/03/last-year-was-the/

Last year was the safest year to fly in more than four decades, says the private Aircraft Crashes Record Office (ACRO). Hmm—maybe United has just been trying to take the record for safest flights by cancellng them all. [Reuters]

Health Record Privacy Law Is Messing Up Research

Health Record Privacy Law Is Messing Up Research

Just days after a deputy director of national intelligence told Americans that we need to rethink our concepts of privacy, comes news that it may, in fact, be harming us in the long run. In a recent national survey, nearly 70% of research scientists said the 2003 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is “impeding scientific research, stalling clinical studies and halting others altogether.”

Google Announces Plans For Online Personal Health Records Service

Google Announces Plans For Online Personal Health Records Service

Microsoft beat them to the punch, but Google has announced that they, too, are planning to roll out a service that lets consumers store their medical records online and transfer them between health care providers as needed. Marissa Mayer at Google said the idea was spawned after reports of lost or damaged records in the wake of Hurricane Katrina: “It doesn’t make sense to generate this volume of information on paper. It should be something that is digital. People should have control over their own records.” Mayer says they hope to include things like x-rays, and that it “will take a lot of breakthroughs in digitization.”

EMI To Go DRM-Free

EMI To Go DRM-Free

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that EMI, a Big Four music label and RIAA member, will release “significant amounts of its catalogue” unencumbered by DRM. The announcement from EMI is expected at an 8 a.m. EST press conference in London, featuring Apple CEO Steve Jobs.

Privately most labels rejected the idea out of hand, but EMI, the world’s third-largest music company by sales, was already quietly exploring the idea of dropping DRM. EMI has struggled to overcome poor results and a laggard digital strategy, potentially contributing to its willingness to take a bold stance on DRM.

EMI will make the DRM-free portions of its catalogue available for download via iTunes. We wonder how the RIAA will react. — CAREY GREENBERG-BERGER

Financial Records: Keep or Toss?

• Sales receipts for minor purchases, after you’ve satisfactorily used the item and if it has no warranty.

You mean we don’t need this Ruby Tuesday’s receipt from 1997? —MEGHANN MARCO

EMI May Unshackle Catalogue, Usher In Second Dawn Of DRM-Free Music

The New York Times reports that EMI, one of the Big Four labels, may soon release its music without DRM. The third largest label behind Universal and Sony, murmurs of EMI intentions come on the heels of Steve Jobs’ appeal for DRM-free music.

DRM-Free Music in “One to Two Years”?

The New York Times has an article today detailing the MIDEM music industry conference, and are reporting that at least 4 major record companies “could move toward the sale of unrestricted digital files in the MP3 format within months.”

Cingular Customer Denied Access To Billing Records

Cingular Customer Denied Access To Billing Records

If you’re looking to join the newly minted class action against Cingular, you might want to turn that shredder off. A customer was seeking to replace the billing records he had shredded, in order to prepare to join the suit, and called up the cellphone company.

Mass Trolling of Banks Records Unavoidable

Mass Trolling of Banks Records Unavoidable

Vice President Dick Cheney fired a stern rebuke on Friday to journalists after the disclosure of a secret program that combed a massive array of international banking transactions searching for terrorist ties, reports NYT.