Photographer Still Trying To Claim Ownership Of Monkey Selfie

Photographer Still Trying To Claim Ownership Of Monkey Selfie

Even though the U.S. Copyright Office has explicitly stated that one can not register a copyright for “A photograph taken by a monkey,” the photographer whose camera was used by a monkey for a now-famous self-portrait is still trying to claim that he is the owner of the photograph and demanding that a website purchase a license to run the image. [More]

The monkey seen in this image is actually the one who pressed the button on the camera. Copyright law forbids a non-human animal from holding a copyright, so many believe the image is in the public domain. David Slater, the photographer whose camera was used for the photo, disagrees.

U.S. Copyright Office Agrees: Monkey Self-Portraits Are Public Domain

In news that will disappoint monkey photographers nationwide, a draft report from the U.S. Copyright Office seems to make the regulators’ opinion pretty clear on the question of who holds the copyright for a photo — or any work — created by an animal. [More]

Wikimedia: Camera-Owner Doesn’t Hold Copyright To Monkey Selfie

The image uploaded to Wikimedia Commons was taken by a macaque monkey who had briefly snatched away a professional photographer's camera.

If I take a photo with your camera, who holds the rights to the image? After all, I’m the photographer; you just happened to own the camera. What if I’m a non-human animal who can’t hold copyright — does that automatically mean the copyright defaults to the camera’s owner? Not according to Wikimedia, the organization behind Wikipedia. [More]

Aldus Huxley's Brave New World entered the public domain in Canada yesterday, but not in the U.S., where it will remain protected for another 20 years.

Celebrate Public Domain Day… By Realizing That Not A Single Published Work Will Become Public Domain Until 2019

As happens every January, various pieces of literature, scholarship, film, music, plays, and other copyrighted works of art enter into the public domain, meaning the public has the right to publish, perform, use, and display these works without seeking permission. That is, except in the U.S., where not a single published work will be joining the public domain until 2019. [More]

Magazine That Stole Writer's Story Likely Shutting Down; Blames Writer

Magazine That Stole Writer's Story Likely Shutting Down; Blames Writer

Some people don’t know when to leave bad enough alone. Earlier this month, we brought you the story of a freelance writer who not only found out that a small cooking magazine had lifted her entire story without permission or payment, but then insulted the author saying she should have paid them for the tiny bit of editing they did on her text before printing it. Now the editor at the magazine says it’s likely curtains for the publication — and you’ll never guess who she’s blaming. [More]

Magazine Copies Entire Story From Web, Tells Writer She
Should Pay Them For Publishing It

Magazine Copies Entire Story From Web, Tells Writer She Should Pay Them For Publishing It

A writer was recently surprised to find that a piece she’d written about apple pies for a website in 2005 had been picked up wholesale by a small cooking magazine without anyone telling her. She was even more surprised by the reaction she received from one of the mag’s editors. [More]

B&N Wraps Public Domain Books In DRM To Protect Authors' Copyrights. What?

B&N Wraps Public Domain Books In DRM To Protect Authors' Copyrights. What?

The ebook “war” is a race to the bottom, apparently, with Barnes & Noble trying to out-do Amazon on DRM stupidity. A reader emailed B&N customer service to point out that their “free books” offer consists of 5 public domain titles that are no longer protected under copyright, yet are still locked down with digital rights management (DRM). Their response? “For copyright protection purposes, these files are encrypted and cannot be converted or printed.”