California Students Protest, Riot Over Tuition Gouging

California Students Protest, Riot Over Tuition Gouging

Responding to UC regents’ efforts to slap students with a 32 percent tuition increase, groups at UC Berkeley, UC Santa Cruz, UCLA and other schools took to the streets, 1960s style, the San Francisco Chronicle reports.

Dave Carroll Launches Second "United Breaks Guitars" Song And Video

Dave Carroll Launches Second "United Breaks Guitars" Song And Video

Musician Dave Carroll hit the jackpot with his first song, “United Breaks Guitars,” last month. The song, the video, and the subsequent media coverage formed a perfect anti-ad for United’s poor handling of customer property. Now he’s released the second of his planned three-song cycle and this one has more of a “we could have had something together” feel to it. Like any sequel, it’s about 600 times more elaborate. We’ll always love “United Breaks Guitars” most of all, but it’s great to see Carroll continue his one-man shaming of an airline for not doing the right thing when it had the chance.

Did Dave Carroll's Broken Guitar Videos Cost United $180 Million?

Did Dave Carroll's Broken Guitar Videos Cost United $180 Million?

The Times of London claims that public relations fallout from Dave Carroll’s catchy videos panning United Airlines for breaking his beloved $3500 Taylor guitar and then denying his damage claim may have cost the airline’s shareholders up to $180 million.

United Breaks Guitars

United Breaks Guitars

When United Airlines broke Dave Carroll’s $3500 Taylor guitar in the the spring of 2008, he contacted them to ask for compensation. After all, he and other passengers watched from the plane as United baggage handlers actually threw his guitar around on the tarmac. United said they wouldn’t pay for the damages, so Carroll wrote this catchy song about how much United sucks. We think it should go in United’s next ad campaign.

Car Dealership Picketing: American West Coast Edition

Car Dealership Picketing: American West Coast Edition

Remember the disgruntled Range Rover owner in England who lettered his complaints on the vehicle and parked it in front of the dealership? Reader M.H. discovered his American counterpart standing in front of a Hyundai dealership in Vancouver, Washington.

Range Rover Protests Its Own Existence Outside Dealership

Range Rover Protests Its Own Existence Outside Dealership

Sure, if you’re dissatisfied with your vehicle, you could complain to the company. You could write to Consumerist, or even start your own Web site. Or you could park it in front of the dealership that it came from, with a list of the vehicle’s flaws and a warning to potential buyers plastered on in vinyl letters. A man in Colchester, England did just that.

National Federation Of The Blind Mounts Protest Over Kindle 2 Restrictions

National Federation Of The Blind Mounts Protest Over Kindle 2 Restrictions

When the Authors Guild successfully agitated for the right to selectively remove the text-to-speech feature from books read on Amazon’s Kindle 2, they alienated an entire group of potential consumers: people who have trouble reading normal printed works. Now a group called the Reading Rights Coalition is going to storm the Authors Guild’s NYC office tomorrow at noon to protest.

Dressless Brides Picket Bankrupt Millburn NJ Bridal Shop

Dressless Brides Picket Bankrupt Millburn NJ Bridal Shop

About 10 women who paid up to $4,000 for dresses they never received picketed the bankrupt Calvary Bridal House in Millburn, NJ this past weekend, screaming and holding hand-made signs that said things like “Fraud” “Scam” and “”Bride in stress, where’s my dress?”

Amazon Pulls Negative Reviews Of 'Spore,' Then Reinstates Them

Amazon Pulls Negative Reviews Of 'Spore,' Then Reinstates Them

Earlier today, about 2200 reviews of the game Spore disappeared from the product page on Amazon.com, almost all of them negative. Did Amazon censor the reviews because of their anti-DRM nature? Amazon says no, that it was a technical glitch, and they restored the reviews by the end of today. An Amazon spokesperson told Ars Technica, “Amazon doesn’t censor or edit customer reviews based [on their content] and we’d only remove a review if it fell outside our guidelines.” Spore’s rating is back to a single star, and it’s #5 on Amazon’s video games chart.

Protesters Taunt Goldman Sachs Employees By Singing "Frosty The Goldman" Outside Company Christmas Party

Last week a clutch of protesters sang parodic carols outside the Goldman Sachs Christmas party at the hoity-toity BLVD club to protest the companies involvement with subprime mortgages.

California Supreme Court: Feel Free To Protest Inside The Mall

California Supreme Court: Feel Free To Protest Inside The Mall

In a 4-to-3 decision, the court said a San Diego mall violated California law protecting free speech when its owners barred protesters from distributing leaflets in front of one of the mall’s stores, asking shoppers not to give the store their business.

Flyer's Rights Group To Stage Demonstration In D.C.

Flyer's Rights Group To Stage Demonstration In D.C.

The protest’s organizers are planning to build a mock commercial aircraft that has seen its passengers’ patience and infrastructure wear thin after hours of idling. The 28-foot aircraft, really a long grey tent made to look like a plane, will be adorned by sounds of crying babies, sneezing customers and overflowing toilets.

Former Marshall Field's Customers Take To The Chicago Streets To Protest Macy's

Former Marshall Field's Customers Take To The Chicago Streets To Protest Macy's

Chicagoans don’t like change. (Take Wrigley Field, for example, in all its jumbotron-less glory.) Yes, they are a strange, stubborn people who do not eat ketchup on hot dogs and who put the sauce on top of their pizza. And they don’t like Macy’s. Why? Because Macy’s did away with Marshall Field’s.

Burger King Offers To Send Employment Recruiters To Tomato Farms

To ask Burger King Corporation to pay a penny more a pound for tomatoes to increase workers’ wages is similar to asking shoppers to voluntarily pay a penny more per pound at the grocery store for tomatoes to increase workers’ wages. Both Burger King Corporation and grocery store shoppers have no business relationship with the workers and cannot get the extra penny to them.

Since they don’t want to seem, like, heartless or anything, Burger King has offered to work with the CIW to send human resources folks from BK down to the farm:

Breastfeeding Protesters Target Airlines

Breastfeeding Protesters Target Airlines

They’re at it again according to USA Today: “Carrying signs with slogans such as “Best in-flight meal ever,” scores of mothers breast-fed their babies at airports around the country Tuesday in a show of support for a woman who was ordered off a plane for nursing her daughter without covering up.”

Nurse-In Planned at Victoria’s Secret

Nurse-In Planned at Victoria’s Secret

In protest of Victoria’s Secret employees acting like boobs, a national protest plans to whip out theirs.

HazMat Protesters Drop Mad Science

Here’s another version of the DRM protest involving hazmat suits and the San Fran Apple store. It’s got less Talking Heads, more people speaking about (or, heads talking…) about why DRM is bad. If you don’t know why it is, watch. If you do and would like to have your beliefs affirmed, watch. If you like sweaty geeks, watch. All we know is DRM prevented us from easily transmogrifying our sister into the next Grandmaster Flash, so now we’re totally mad against it, even more than we were madly before.

Verizon Wants to Chat About -$1000 Bill

Verizon Wants to Chat About -$1000 Bill

Back in mid-may, we decided that the best way to protest the phone companies selling our records to the NSA was to send our cell phone company a bill for $1000. What we did is take our Verizon bill, deduct $1000 from it, and enclose a copy of 18 USC 2701 with relevant secitons highlighted. Specifically, those parts saying that if anyone gives up your phone records, they can get fined $1000. Obviously, this is in jest. But Verizon’s taking it seriously enough to want to schedule a conference call with us.