(Ken Fager)

Digital Privacy And Parental Rights Act Would Put Restrictions On The Use Of Student Data Online

Students are more dependent than ever on technology and the Internet for their education, but those same apps and online learning tools that help educate them could be putting their personal information at risk if shared improperly. Nearly a month after it was first expected, a pair of U.S. representatives have introduced a bill aiming to restrict third-party use of students’ sensitive personal data. [More]

(Taro the Shiba Inu)

What Information Is Available When Someone Scans My Driver’s License?

There’s a lot of information about you on the back of your state-issued driver’s license or non-driver ID card, but does scanning your license or making a copy of it give potential identity thieves key information about you? It’s not easy to find out what data is encoded in the barcodes on the back of your ID cards, and your state’s motor vehicles department may not want you to know. [More]

Supreme Court To Decide If You Can Sue When Data Aggregators Are Wrong

Supreme Court To Decide If You Can Sue When Data Aggregators Are Wrong

There’s a true 21st-century case a-brewing at the Supreme Court, one of those unsexy legal questions with enormous potential repercussions. At heart of the matter is personal data. There’s an insane amount of it out there, on each and every one of us, and it’s all for trade, barter, and sale. But that doesn’t mean it’s all correct or true. So if some website or service goes around saying you’re someone you’re not, do you have the right to sue?
[More]

RadioShack Bankruptcy Trustee Wants Customer Mailing Lists Removed From Auction

RadioShack Bankruptcy Trustee Wants Customer Mailing Lists Removed From Auction

Bankrupt RadioShack doesn’t have a lot of assets left that anyone might want, but one very marketable asset is its mailing lists. Specifically, 65 million names and addresses and 13 million e-mail addresses. In March, RadioShack said that it wouldn’t be selling that information…yet. Now that it’s time to sell off the former company’s intellectual property, all of that contact inforamtion is potentially for sale again. [More]

New “Hello” App Puts Facebook In Control Of Screening, Blocking Phone Calls

New “Hello” App Puts Facebook In Control Of Screening, Blocking Phone Calls

Because we’ve somehow gotten to a place where we can no longer answer the phone without knowing exactly who is calling and why, Facebook is rolling out a new app, dubbed “Hello,” that effectively uses all the info Facebook has about its users to help you decide whether to answer/ignore/block incoming calls. [More]

(Rachel)

FBI, TSA Issue Warning To Airlines Over Possible Flight Hackings

A week after a government report identified security weaknesses within the airline industry including the possibility that newer airplanes with interconnected WiFi systems could be hacked, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Transportation Security Administration issued an alert warning airlines to be vigilant about monitoring for such threats. [More]

(C x 2)

The Other Danger Of Online Payday Loans: Identity Theft

Many people who seek online payday loans are already in a very vulnerable position when they take on the added risk of the excessive interest rates and often exorbitant fees associated with these short-term loans. But there’s another danger possibly lurking in the payday shadows: Having all their personal and financial data end up in the hands of cyber criminals. [More]

FCC Looking Into Verizon “Supercookies” That Track Wireless Users’ Behavior

FCC Looking Into Verizon “Supercookies” That Track Wireless Users’ Behavior

For years, the Internet behavior of all Verizon Wireless smartphone customers was being tracked by “supercookies” on their devices that they could not opt out of. After the tracking became public knowledge, the company recently gave its customers a way to shake off the invasive snooping, but that isn’t stopping the FCC from looking into whether the program violated federal guidelines. [More]

(Renee Rendler-Kaplan)

DEA Sued Over Secret Mass Surveillance Of Phone Calls

The backlash against the federal government’s surveillance programs continues. This time, the folks at Human Rights Watch have filed suit against the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, alleging that the DEA’s bulk collection of data related to certain phone calls made by the organization runs afoul of basic protections afforded by the Constitution. [More]

John Oliver Gets Edward Snowden To Explain Government Snooping In Terms Of Penis Photos

John Oliver Gets Edward Snowden To Explain Government Snooping In Terms Of Penis Photos

By June 1, Congress must decide whether or not to reauthorize certain sections of the controversial USA Patriot Act (aka the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act), but even though it’s been nearly two years since former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden revealed the NSA’s massive and far-reaching data collection programs, many Americans either are only vaguely aware or don’t understand because it’s not easy to immediately see how things like PRISM and MYSTIC affect your daily existence. That’s why John Oliver not only went straight to Snowden for an explanation of these programs, but to have him put the snooping in terms many Internet-era perverts can understand: penis photos. [More]

(Pamela Greer)

Retailers Only Have Eyes For You With Latest Online Marketing Efforts

On the one hand, it can be very convenient to get a coupon emailed to you based on your obsession with tacos. On the other, having every website you visit blast your eyes with ads for the same darn pair of lime green shoes you already bought as part of a Halloween costume and never intend to buy again. But some retailers say they’re working on tailoring such marketing efforts down to each person individually, to maximize effectiveness and cut down on irritation. [More]

You Can Now Finally, Really Truly, Opt Out Of Verizon Wireless Tracking “Supercookies”

You Can Now Finally, Really Truly, Opt Out Of Verizon Wireless Tracking “Supercookies”

Back in January, Verizon Wireless said they would let users opt out of a problematic universal tracking “super cookie” they had been using for years. This week, Verizon’s finally got their act together and the opt-out option is live. [More]

(Phillip Pessar)

Good News: RadioShack Says Consumer Information Isn’t Part Of Bankruptcy Auction

Earlier this week, we reported that the one of the assets of the former RadioShack empire up for sale is the tens of millions of names, mailing addresses, phone numbers, and e-mail addresses that the retailer has collected from its customers. Many states’ attorneys general objected to this possible sale, noting that it may violate Texas law and the company’s own privacy policies. Fortunately, that consumer data is not yet for sale. [More]

Your Personal Data Could Be For Sale In RadioShack Bankruptcy Auction

Your Personal Data Could Be For Sale In RadioShack Bankruptcy Auction

Have you handed your name, address, e-mail address, or phone number over to RadioShack as part of a purchase or, inexplicably, when you returned an item that you bought with cash? As the bankruptcy auction of the smoldering remains of The Shack continues into its second day, we’ve learned that one of the assets for sale is RadioShack’s customer list, which includes more than 65 million mailing addresses and more than 13 million e-mail addresses. Update: The bankruptcy auction’s privacy ombudsman says that customer information isn’t for sale. Yet. [More]

(snow_000_angel)

Amazon’s Streaming Gaming Service Twitch Says It Might Be The Latest Victim Of A Data Breach

The long list of data breaches got a bit longer on Monday after Amazon-owned game streaming company Twitch determined hackers may have gained unauthorized access to some users’ account information. [More]