John Oliver Gets Edward Snowden To Explain Government Snooping In Terms Of Penis Photos

John Oliver Gets Edward Snowden To Explain Government Snooping In Terms Of Penis Photos

By June 1, Congress must decide whether or not to reauthorize certain sections of the controversial USA Patriot Act (aka the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act), but even though it’s been nearly two years since former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden revealed the NSA’s massive and far-reaching data collection programs, many Americans either are only vaguely aware or don’t understand because it’s not easy to immediately see how things like PRISM and MYSTIC affect your daily existence. That’s why John Oliver not only went straight to Snowden for an explanation of these programs, but to have him put the snooping in terms many Internet-era perverts can understand: penis photos. [More]

(Pamela Greer)

Retailers Only Have Eyes For You With Latest Online Marketing Efforts

On the one hand, it can be very convenient to get a coupon emailed to you based on your obsession with tacos. On the other, having every website you visit blast your eyes with ads for the same darn pair of lime green shoes you already bought as part of a Halloween costume and never intend to buy again. But some retailers say they’re working on tailoring such marketing efforts down to each person individually, to maximize effectiveness and cut down on irritation. [More]

You Can Now Finally, Really Truly, Opt Out Of Verizon Wireless Tracking “Supercookies”

You Can Now Finally, Really Truly, Opt Out Of Verizon Wireless Tracking “Supercookies”

Back in January, Verizon Wireless said they would let users opt out of a problematic universal tracking “super cookie” they had been using for years. This week, Verizon’s finally got their act together and the opt-out option is live. [More]

(Phillip Pessar)

Good News: RadioShack Says Consumer Information Isn’t Part Of Bankruptcy Auction

Earlier this week, we reported that the one of the assets of the former RadioShack empire up for sale is the tens of millions of names, mailing addresses, phone numbers, and e-mail addresses that the retailer has collected from its customers. Many states’ attorneys general objected to this possible sale, noting that it may violate Texas law and the company’s own privacy policies. Fortunately, that consumer data is not yet for sale. [More]

Your Personal Data Could Be For Sale In RadioShack Bankruptcy Auction

Your Personal Data Could Be For Sale In RadioShack Bankruptcy Auction

Have you handed your name, address, e-mail address, or phone number over to RadioShack as part of a purchase or, inexplicably, when you returned an item that you bought with cash? As the bankruptcy auction of the smoldering remains of The Shack continues into its second day, we’ve learned that one of the assets for sale is RadioShack’s customer list, which includes more than 65 million mailing addresses and more than 13 million e-mail addresses. Update: The bankruptcy auction’s privacy ombudsman says that customer information isn’t for sale. Yet. [More]

(snow_000_angel)

Amazon’s Streaming Gaming Service Twitch Says It Might Be The Latest Victim Of A Data Breach

The long list of data breaches got a bit longer on Monday after Amazon-owned game streaming company Twitch determined hackers may have gained unauthorized access to some users’ account information. [More]

AT&T Asked RadioShack To Destroy Customer And Proprietary Information

AT&T Asked RadioShack To Destroy Customer And Proprietary Information

The auction for the smoldering remains of RadioShack is happening right now at the offices of the company’s attorneys in New York City, and something caught our attention while we wait for news about the winning bidders and future of the Shack and its stores and employees. AT&T has filed an objection to the proceedings in court, asking RadioShack to destroy any sensitive information about customers and AT&T itself. [More]

(Adam Fagen)

Hilton HHonors Site Flaw Exposed All Accounts To Potential Hijacking

Following a report of a spike in hijacked accounts, Hilton recently asked its HHonors Awards members to change their passwords — offering them 1,000 bonus points if they did so before April 1. But cybersecurity experts say that hackers didn’t actually need passwords to take control of other folks’ HHonors accounts. [More]

(Enokson)

Legislation Would Limit How Education Companies Use Students’ Online Data

With the use of technology now tightly tied to education, consumer advocates and parent groups have increasingly voiced concern about how student data is used. New legislation aims to alleviate worries over the exploitation of students’ personal information by placing restrictions on how that data can be used by third-party technology companies. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Target Poised To Settle Class-Action Suit Related To Massive 2013 Hack For $10M

More than a year after Target announced that it had been victim to a massive data breach during the 2013 holiday season, the company is poised to pay $10 million to settle a class-action suit stemming from the incident. [More]

Health Insurer Premera Blue Cross Latest Hack Victim, 11M Consumers Affected

Health Insurer Premera Blue Cross Latest Hack Victim, 11M Consumers Affected

Just a month after tens of millions of consumers’ personal information was breached in the hack of health insurance firm Anthem, another U.S.-based insurance provider says it was the victim of a cyber attack affecting as many as 11 million customers. [More]

This Talking Barbie Doll Can Listen To You… And Share What You Say With Third Parties

This Talking Barbie Doll Can Listen To You… And Share What You Say With Third Parties

Since some imaginative cave child made the first doll out of a dead marmot, kids have been talking to their make-believe pals. And for more than a century, some of these dolls have been talking back. But the newest generation of Mattel Barbie dolls may take things to the next level by not only listening to what you have to say, but by sharing your conversations with complete strangers. [More]

(Bill Binns)

Report: Google Error Leaks Hidden Data For 280,000 Domains

Usually when we hear that a company has had a bunch of data leaked to the world, hackers are responsible. But in the case of a Google leak involving hidden data for 280,000 domain names, a bug in Google’s system is apparently to blame. [More]

Apple Clarifies Requirements For Medical Research Apps

Apple Clarifies Requirements For Medical Research Apps

Earlier this week, Apple announced HeathKit, an open-source software framework to help medical researchers use iPhones to gather data for medical research. This raised some concerns about researchers’ plans to share data collected from the apps, as well as consent and privacy. Now Apple has revised their App Store guidelines before the kit launches, but is that enough to keep study participants informed and safe? [More]

FTC Chair Edith Ramirez Talks Privacy, Data Security

FTC Chair Edith Ramirez Talks Privacy, Data Security

You may now be able to change your thermostat from another continent, your fridge might know when you need to buy more eggs, and your connected TV recommends shows and movies. But is your data being used for things other than keeping your house warm, your eggs in stock, and your kids entertained — and, just as importantly — is it secure? [More]

The Privacy And Consent Issues With Apple’s New ResearchKit

The Privacy And Consent Issues With Apple’s New ResearchKit

Earlier this week, Apple gave us wrist computers and took away almost all of the ports in its notebook computers, and also announced something that gadget fans may not have expected: a set of apps called ResearchKit designed to help medical researchers collect data from ordinary citizens for their research. Tens of thousands of people have already signed up for studies, which is potentially great for science. Is it good for us, the potential research subjects, though? [More]