(Anthem)

“Tens Of Millions” Of Personal Records Stolen In Hack On Health Insurance Company Anthem

Any data breach is bad, but the more personal they are — and the more widespread — the worse. And by both metrics, the hack just announced by major health insurer Anthem is particularly terrible. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

RadioShack Employee Accused Of Stealing Racy Photos From Woman’s Phone

Recently when we’ve talked about stolen photos it’s been related to a massive data hack. But for a San Francisco woman, the invasion of privacy came at a much smaller, more personal level when several of her intimate photos were allegedly stolen by a local RadioShack employee, who now faces felony charges and a civil lawsuit. [More]

(a lonewolf)

Study: “Anonymous” Credit Card Data Is Actually Completely Identifiable

We all kind of know that credit card data isn’t terribly secure, and that the payment information is likely to get swiped eventually. But that information is all theoretically anonymous. Without a name, address, or ZIP code attached, our credit card information doesn’t say much about us personally, right? Wrong. [More]

Verizon Wireless Will Finally Allow Users To Opt Out Of Being Tracked By “Supercookies”

Verizon Wireless Will Finally Allow Users To Opt Out Of Being Tracked By “Supercookies”

Verizon has been watching you. If you use their mobile service, Verizon has been tracking your every move on the internet for the better part of the last two years, with no way for you to opt out. That’s the bad news. Here’s the good: the company is finally letting consumers turn off the trackers. [More]

Police Ask Waze To Remove Speed Trap Alerts To Protect Cops

Police Ask Waze To Remove Speed Trap Alerts To Protect Cops

The navigation and traffic app Waze is sometimes very helpful to help motorists avoid snarled traffic, construction, and road hazards. One of its features has some police officers worried, though. They worry that the feature that allows Waze users to alert each other to speed traps could endanger the lives of police officers. [More]

(frankieleon)

4 Ways Copyright Law Actually Controls Your Whole Digital Life

We all know that copyright law means you shouldn’t download copies of movies from shady torrent sites, and that you should pay for the music you listen to. We know it means people and companies have rights to stuff they make, like photos and music and books, and that there are legal and illegal ways of sharing those things. [More]

Verizon E-Mail Vulnerability Left All Users’ Messages At Risk

Verizon E-Mail Vulnerability Left All Users’ Messages At Risk

While many people no longer use the free e-mail accounts made available by their Internet service providers, there are still millions of Americans who do. And up until last week, a reported vulnerability in Verizon’s My FiOS app that left all Verizon e-mail users’ messages at risk of being read by complete strangers. [More]

Consumer Advocates Ask Congress To Please Consider Actually Helping Consumers This Term

Consumer Advocates Ask Congress To Please Consider Actually Helping Consumers This Term

The new month and new year brought with them a new Congress, and with that comes an all-new legislative agenda. Lawmakers get to start over with the process of introducing bills and hopefully passing some laws, and consumer advocates are calling on the President and all the legislators on Capitol Hill to get moving on an agenda to help American consumers. [More]

(redsox223)

Uber Promises To Share Trip Data With Cities While Guarding Customer Privacy

On the one hand, the more information about how its traffic works a city can get, the more material it has to improve parking, or transit in that area. But on the other, customers who use ride-sharing services like Uber might balk at the idea of information about their trips being shared outside the company. Uber is pledging now to both share data about rides with U.S. cities as well as safeguard customers’ privacy. [More]

(frankieleon)

Thieves Used United, American Airlines Customer Accounts To Book Free Trips, Upgrades

If you had boat-loads of miles saved on your American Airlines or United Airlines account you might want to make sure they’re still around, now that botmoh airlines have confirmed thieves used stolen usernames and passwords to book free trips or upgrades. [More]

President Obama speaking to an audience at the FTC on January 12, 2015.

President Proposes New Legislation To Protect Consumers’ And Students’ Data

From hacks and data breaches to identity theft and good old-fashioned money theft, crime and privacy in the digital world are shaping up to be the big buzzwords of 2015. Protecting consumers from harms like retail and website hacks is one of the bigger, newer challenges facing the feds going forward. Today, President Obama outlined his proposals for some laws that could help protect American consumers online. [More]

Until a recent update, images posted to Instagram when your account was private could still be accessed even after your account was set to private.

Instagram Fixes A Loophole That Allowed Public To See Private Pics

Some 300 million people have accounts on Facebook-owned photo-sharing service Instagram, and while many of those users are fine with letting the world see every image they post, some Instagrammers prefer to keep their pics private. However, until this weekend there was a loophole that could give people unauthorized access to private images on Instagram. [More]

(Jenn and Tony Bot)

Banks Want To Robocall You When It’s Important, But Not Important Enough To Speak To A Human

Under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, companies can’t robocall you on your cellphone unless you’ve given them prior consent to contact you at that number. Now the banking industry is trying to gain exemptions for this rule, claiming there are times when they just need to call your cellphone even though the need isn’t urgent enough to have an actual human make that call. They also don’t want to be penalized for robocalling the wrong number. [More]

Third Time’s The Charm? House To Take Another Stab At Terrible CISPA Internet Bill

Third Time’s The Charm? House To Take Another Stab At Terrible CISPA Internet Bill

Not unlike a mummy, the reanimated corpse of a bad bill that just doesn’t know when to stay dead is once again coming to the floor of a Congress near you this week. Tomorrow, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act — better known as CISPA — is once again going to be introduced before the House of Representatives. [More]

(Dev.Arka)

If Your iCloud Password Is ‘Password1,’ Choose Something Else Right Now

If you use Apple’s iCloud service, you know that Apple has some limits on what your password can be, which are meant to make your account harder to break into. The password must have at least one letter, at least one number, at least one capital letter, and have at least 8 characters. However, it’s still possible to come up with a terrible password within these parameters. [More]

Marriott: It’s Okay, We Only Want To Jam Your Hotspot In The Rooms You Actually Need It In

Marriott: It’s Okay, We Only Want To Jam Your Hotspot In The Rooms You Actually Need It In

Last fall, Marriott got in trouble for jamming the signals from users’ portable hotspots in one of their conference centers. That’s illegal, and the FCC fined them big bucks for it. Now the hotel chain is trying to make it legal, which has gone over very poorly in the public eye. But wait, Marriott says — we don’t want to stop you from using personal hotspots in your room! We only want to block you from using them in shared spaces where you could actually benefit from having them. [More]

Ex-Employees Sue Sony Pictures, Claiming Company Failed To Protect Workers’ Personal Info From Hack

Ex-Employees Sue Sony Pictures, Claiming Company Failed To Protect Workers’ Personal Info From Hack

In the wake of the major hack over at Sony Pictures Entertainment earlier this month, two former employees are suing the company, claiming that Sony Pictures didn’t do enough to protect their personal information from hackers. [More]

In Wake Of Target Ruling, Will Retailers Scale Back Security So They Can Plead Ignorance?

In Wake Of Target Ruling, Will Retailers Scale Back Security So They Can Plead Ignorance?

Last week, a federal court in Minnesota gave the go-ahead to a lawsuit filed against Target by several banks trying to claim damages from the massive 2013 payment systems breach. Now, some worry that the court’s decision could lead retailers to go with simpler, perhaps less secure, systems rather than risk missing a red flag on a more complicated one. [More]