(Rosalyn Davis)

Advisory Panel Tells President To Stop Letting NSA Collect Everyone’s Phone Data

An advisory panel to President Obama is calling for an end to the NSA’s highly controversial phone data collection program. [More]

(afagen)

FTC: 12 Companies, Including 3 NFL Teams, Misrepresent Compliance Of Privacy Frameworks

Abiding by privacy standards is a big deal, even if those standards are voluntary. Twelve businesses, some that handle sensitive personal data about health and employment, were found to falsely claim they abided by international privacy frameworks. [More]

United Nations Names Online Privacy That You Probably Don’t Have As A Universal Human Right

United Nations Names Online Privacy That You Probably Don’t Have As A Universal Human Right

Online privacy: it’s a contentious ground between corporations and consumers, a troubled 21st century frontier of expectations, and, apparently, a universal human right. [More]

Snapchat Says It’ll Release More Secure Version Of App In Wake Of Hack

Snapchat Says It’ll Release More Secure Version Of App In Wake Of Hack

This week many Snapchat users were likely shocked to found out that 4.6 million usernames and the phone numbers connected to them were leaked online by a group of hackers. In response to the hack, Snapchat says now that it will release an updated version of its app that will allow users to opt out of the “Find Friends” feature that was exploited. [More]

Report: 4.6 Million Snapchat Phone Numbers And Usernames Leaked Online

Report: 4.6 Million Snapchat Phone Numbers And Usernames Leaked Online

While many Snapchat users are used to nudity, many of them only thought they were exposed for the 10 or so seconds that late-night selfie was on their recipient’s screen. But a new report says the phone numbers and usernames associated with more than 4.6 million Snapchatters in North America were leaked and posted online. [More]

Maker Of Wildly Popular Flashlight App Failed To Tell Users It Was Sharing Their Location Info

Maker Of Wildly Popular Flashlight App Failed To Tell Users It Was Sharing Their Location Info

Most of us have had the bright idea to use our smartphones as flashlights when searching underneath the couch or in the backseat of a dark car. And many millions of people have downloaded flashlight apps that maximize the light coming out of their devices. Most of those people probably never even considered that a flashlight app would be doing anything other than turning on the phone’s lights, and certainly not transmitting location data to third parties. [More]

Microsoft Promises That New Kinect Is Not (Always) A Crazy Spying Machine

Microsoft Promises That New Kinect Is Not (Always) A Crazy Spying Machine

With the new Xbox One console only weeks away from launch, Microsoft is doing its best to quell concerns that the new Kinect motion and voice sensor will be spying on users and storing important, sensitive information. [More]

College Board & ACT Sued For Selling Personal Info Of Test-Takers

College Board & ACT Sued For Selling Personal Info Of Test-Takers

As anyone who took the ACT or SAT tests remembers, shortly after you get your scores, your mailbox is flooded with brochures, pamphlets, and catalogs from schools that want your tuition money. This isn’t a coincidence, as The College Board and ACT, Inc. — the companies behind these tests — sells test-takers’ information to colleges. But a new lawsuit alleges that this practice is a breach of contract as it’s done without the test-takers’ consent. [More]

Your E-ZPass Might Be Tracking You Everywhere, Not Just Tollbooths

Your E-ZPass Might Be Tracking You Everywhere, Not Just Tollbooths

When you get a toll-paying transponder like the E-ZPass, you assume that it just sort of sits there until you drive through a toll booth. That’s not true. Maybe, according to a recent presentation at DEFCON, you should put your E-ZPass away unless you’re actually paying a toll right now. [More]

FTC Looking Into Recent Change To Facebook Privacy Policy

FTC Looking Into Recent Change To Facebook Privacy Policy

Back in 2011, Facebook settled charges with the Federal Trade Commission that the website deceived consumers by telling them they could keep their information private, only to repeatedly allow that information to be shared and made public. The settlement requires that Facebook get explicit permission from users before sharing such information, but the FTC wants to know if the website’s latest privacy update violates that agreement. [More]

(gothamiste)

Google Defends Scanning Users’ Emails Because Humans Aren’t Actually Reading Anything

Google’s attorneys are having their say in court documents as part of the months-long battle over whether or not it’s okay for Google to read users’ private emails. The company is defending itself against a class action lawsuit filed in May that alleged the company “unlawfully opens up reads, and acquires the content of people’s private email messages.” [More]

(Atwater Village Newbie)

Google: Of Course We’re Going To See What’s In Emails Sent To Gmail Addresses, Don’t Be Silly

Raise your hand if you use Gmail. Now look around at your pals, who are ostensibly reading this with you and are perhaps one of 425 million Gmail users. Anyone sending email to those people apparently have no “reasonable expectation” that those communications are confidential, according to a court filing submitted by Google. [More]

Sylvan Tries To Distance Itself From Learning Center That Left Sensitive Files In Trash

Sylvan Tries To Distance Itself From Learning Center That Left Sensitive Files In Trash

Yesterday we told you about the Sylvan Learning Center in Beaverton, OR, that chose to leave hundreds of file folders containing sensitive customer information in a dumpster instead of shredding them. Now, the folks at Sylvan HQ are doing damage control. [More]

I heart privacy?

Mobile Dating App Tinder Says Security Breach Lasted Hours, But Two Weeks Is A Lot Of Hours

For those not in the know, Tinder is a sort of hookup app that works a bit differently than your traditional dating site: Users share their location with the app so Tinder can say hey, there’s someone nearby if you want to meet them. But birth dates and more specific location data of where you are aren’t supposed to show up to other users, and neither is your Facebook profile, as users are  identified on the app by just first name. All of that was exposed during a recent security breach, which yesterday Tinder said lasted only a few hours, but a new report says that was the case for weeks. [More]

(C x 2)

Tell AT&T You Don’t Want It Selling Info About Your Wireless And U-Verse Usage

Last year, Verizon Wireless ticked off a lot of people when it announced its Precision Market Insights program, which sells supposedly anonymous data about customers’ wireless behavior to marketers. Now AT&T has decided it wants to make money selling this sort of info to third parties, but for both wireless and U-Verse customers. [More]

Here's a letter sent to a Consumerist reader in 2013, reminding him to re-opt-out of BofA junk mail.

Bank Of America Makes You Opt Out Of Junk Mail Every 5 Years, Even If You Don’t Have An Account

When you opt out of receiving junk mail from a company, you might think that this is the last time your mailbox will be filled with that particular business’s unsolicited offers. But no, as some companies put time limits on how long you can stop them from wasting time, paper, and money to send you things that go straight into the shredder. [More]

You Can Make Your LinkedIn Profile Stalker-Proof, But Then You Might As Well Not Have A Profile

You Can Make Your LinkedIn Profile Stalker-Proof, But Then You Might As Well Not Have A Profile

On Facebook, you can make your profile very private so that no one outside of your network can see anything other than your name. You can also block individuals from contacting you. Twitter allows you to make your feed private so that you pick and choose who can follow your Tweets. Meanwhile, LinkedIn allows you to limit who can see your profile, but does not give you the ability to block individuals, so it’s kind of an all or nothing. [More]

(Earth2Kim)

Apple Says It Received 5,000 Data Requests From Law Enforcement, Doesn’t Say How Many It Fulfilled

With many people still wondering about the extent to which the National Security Agency and other authorities were peeping in to consumers’ phone and Internet activities, some of the larger firms caught up in the scandal are making attempts at being transparent about what they did and didn’t hand over to the government. However, some are being more transparent than others. [More]