Phone Carriers In Korea Accused Of Illegally Subsidizing iPhones

Phone Carriers In Korea Accused Of Illegally Subsidizing iPhones

Here in the United States, our mobile phone carriers are trying to wean consumers off phone subsidies, so we will begin to understand how much our phones really cost. Meanwhile, over in Samsung country, stores have been charging artificially low prices for the new iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, something that is kind of illegal in South Korea. [More]

AT&T’s New 30-Month Plan Tries To Make It Worth Paying Full Price For Phones

AT&T’s New 30-Month Plan Tries To Make It Worth Paying Full Price For Phones

One of the knocks against unsubsidized wireless plans — those plans where you pay full price for your phone but get a discount on monthly service — is that the discount isn’t enough to justify paying upwards of $600-$750 for a top-of-the-line new phone, and that the monthly installment options are really just de facto contracts. But AT&T’s newest plan stretches out payments long enough so that you pay just about the same price — if not lower — than you would under contract. [More]

Does $100 Moto G Shake Notion That Unsubsidized Smartphones Must Be Expensive?

Does $100 Moto G Shake Notion That Unsubsidized Smartphones Must Be Expensive?

The general line of thought in the wireless market is that prepaid customers are offered older and cheaper smartphones because most prepaid customers don’t also want to splash out the $500-800 for an unlocked, top-of-the-line device. Meanwhile, contract phone customers are pitched those pricier phones but at discounted rates (or monthly installment plans) that make the phones more affordable (and lock the customer into months or years of service). But does a good smartphone need to cost so much? Do phones for the prepaid market need to be so bad? Maybe not. [More]

The Pros And Cons For Consumers Of Ending Wireless Phone Subsidies

The Pros And Cons For Consumers Of Ending Wireless Phone Subsidies

While many overseas wireless providers choose to not subsidize customers’ new phone purchases in exchange for locking the consumer into a contract, it’s still the prevailing model among three of the four major wireless companies here in the U.S., with T-Mobile the sole provider offering only non-contract plans (sort of). But with AT&T recently dipping its toes into the water to encourage customers to buy their own phones, the market may be in for a major change. [More]

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AT&T To Offer $15/Month Discounts To Customers With Out-Of-Contract Phones

Want some more evidence that the failure of the AT&T/T-Mobile has resulted in something resembling actual competition among wireless companies? Months after T-Mo’s shift to an “un-carrier” model, in which the price of a monthly subscription is listed separately from the cost of the phone (and where subscribers who own their phones only pay for service), AT&T is following suit by reshaping its plans to offer discounts to customers with out-of-contract phones and AT&T Next members. [More]

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Will Eliminating Phone Subsidies Save T-Mobile?

Remember the heady days before Google’s Nexus One launched, when we wondered whether a search engine company might be the one to save us from handset subsidies tied to onerous contracts. Two years later, we haven’t quite been saved yet, but one mobile carrier announced bold plans to get rid of handset subsidies. Simply put, the idea of a T-Mobile iPhone is tempting for many, but would you pay as much as $800 up front for one? [More]