Philly Newspapers Hope Cheap Tablets Will Help Sell Digital Subscriptions

Philly Newspapers Hope Cheap Tablets Will Help Sell Digital Subscriptions

The Philadelphia Daily News and Philadelphia Inquirer plan to start offering discounted tablet computers to customers, beginning in late August. The Android-based tablets will come with apps that let customers read the digital editions of the papers, and the price will include a one-to-two-year subscription to the paid digital offerings. [More]

Would You Pay $3 To Watch Rebecca Black's 'Friday' On YouTube?

Would You Pay $3 To Watch Rebecca Black's 'Friday' On YouTube?

Well, it’s Friday, so it’s time for my usual ritual: rocking out to Rebecca Black’s “Friday” video and hoping that no one catches me in the act. Except….wait a minute! Where did the video go? YouTube copyright claim?! It turns out that the video has been pulled from YouTube by Miss Black and her family since the vanity record label that produced the song and video has been trying to cash in on the inexplicable song’s inexplicable success. The last straw came when the label tried to charge users a $2.99 YouTube rental fee to view the clip. Which leads to the important consumer question: is there any music video that you would pay three bucks to watch? [More]

Get Ready To Pay For Your NYT Fix

Get Ready To Pay For Your NYT Fix

New York reports The New York Times is on the verge of charging for its online content once again, after abandoning its pay wall more than two years ago. [More]

Denver Start-Up E-Newspapers Failed Because They Ignored Consumers

Denver Start-Up E-Newspapers Failed Because They Ignored Consumers

There’s a lot of newspaper failure going around, well, everywhere these days, but particularly in Denver, where the Rocky Mountain News and its online offshoots the INDenver Times and the Rocky Mountain Independent have all either ceased publication entirely or drastically shifted their business models to become shadows of their former selves.

Newspapers Aren't Quite Sure Whether You'll Pay To Read Their Stuff Online

Newspapers Aren't Quite Sure Whether You'll Pay To Read Their Stuff Online

Alan Mutter, who pontificates about the print industry on his Reflections of a Newsosaur blog, cites a survey that says 51 percent of paper publishers think it’s a good idea to start charging readers for online content they’ve always given away for free